Obtaining the Value of a Newspaper or Collection…

May 12, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 
Email This Post Email This Post | Print This Post Print This Post

If you have a newspaper or a collection for which you are seeking an appraisal, please contact us directly at info@rarenewspapers.com. If you post the request via a comment to a post, we are likely to miss it. Thanks.

If you liked this post, you may also enjoy...

Anyone know anything about this newspaper?

August 22, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 
Email This Post Email This Post | Print This Post Print This Post

If any of our collectors are looking for an interesting puzzle to solve, here is one. We’ve come across a single sheet newspaper from Dublin, Ireland,  “THE FLYING NEWS-LETTER“, with “Monday October 11” in the dateline. This would seems to be an exceedingly rare title as an internet search resulted in nothing with this title from Dublin.

Blog-8-22-2016-Flying-News-LetterThere is no issue number noted in the masthead as would be typical. There is also no year printed in the dateline, but a search notes that the only Mondays which fell on October 11 from the mid-18th century (my estimate based on paper, format, layout) in which the printer, Edward Exshaw, was working as a printer were 1736 and 1742 as he died in 1748. The years 1725, 1731 also had a Monday, October 11, but a website notes he was “active in Dublin from 1733-1748”. And 1756 and 1762 also had a Monday, October 11, but being after his death his name would not had been in the imprint at the bottom of the back page.
I would be curious to know which of these two years it was printed (no year is noted in any of the articles), and a bit more about how long the newspaper published. Is this issue unique?

Thanks for any help!

If you liked this post, you may also enjoy...

Movie prop newspaper #2… Help needed…

August 18, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 
Email This Post Email This Post | Print This Post Print This Post

Blog-8-18-2016-Movie-Prop-ProhibitionMovie prop newspapers are exactly that – newspapers which have been created for the purpose of being used within a specific movie. e wrote on this in detail at: http://blog.rarenewspapers.com/?p=8860. Over the next few weeks we’ll roll out a series of such issues for which we cannot determine the movie from which it came. Can anyone help? If so, please let us know.

Today’s issue is The New York Chronicle, undated, with the featured headline: “PROHIBITION REPEALED” (see image).

All issues we’ve listed to-date can be found at: Unidentified Movie Prop Newspapers

If you liked this post, you may also enjoy...

The Traveler… the first “learned society” of Washington, D.C.

August 15, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 
Email This Post Email This Post | Print This Post Print This Post

I traveled today to Washington, D.C. by the way of the National Intelligencer dated August 15, 1816. I found there the announcement of the creation of the first “learned society” in Washington D.C.: “A number of the citizens of the District of Columbia, impressed with the importance of forming an association for the purpose of promoting useful knowledge, met on the 28th day of June, 1816,… agreeably to public notice the committee appointed as aforesaid reported the following draft of a constitution which was unanimously agreed to, after having changed the name of the association to that of the COLUMBIAN INSTITUTION for the promotion of Arts and Sciences…” (see image below).

They were responsible for the acquiring the many different species of plants and trees, an idea to apply to Congress for “the appropriation of about 200 acres of ground called “the Mall” which was designed in the original plan of the city for a public garden, the beginning of the botanic garden, many items which are now in the Smithsonian Institute, and more. Many prominent people of the day became were members, including some Presidents.

~The TravelerBlog-8-15-2016-Columbian-Institute

If you liked this post, you may also enjoy...

Great Headlines Speak For Themselves… the Hindenburg tragedy!

August 11, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 
Email This Post Email This Post | Print This Post Print This Post

The best headlines need no commentary. Such is the case with the NEW YORK AMERICAN, May 7, 1937: “HINDENBURG EXPLODES AT LAKEHURST; 35 DEAD“:Blog-8-11-2016-Hindenburg

If you liked this post, you may also enjoy...

A gem from the American Antiquarian Society… The Kentucky Spy…

August 8, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 
Email This Post Email This Post | Print This Post Print This Post

In celebration of its 20oth anniversary the American Antiquarian Society published a beautiful  exhibition catalog titled “In Pursuit Of A Vision – Two Centuries of Collecting at the American Antiquarian Society”. Featured are a fascinating array of books, documents, maps & other paper ephemera, as well as several very rare & unusual newspapers we felt worthy of sharing with our collectors (with permission from the A.A.S.).

Blog-8-8-2016-AAS-Kentucky-Spy181. “The Kentucky Spy and Porcupine Quill“, Frankfort, Kentucky, January 25, 1849

In recent years AAS has actively collected issues of pre-1877 American manuscript periodicals. These handwritten examples mimic printed periodicals in format and content, containing stories, news, and advertisements. Sometimes they were produced by individuals, serving as the manuscript equivalent of amateur newspapers, and sometimes they were issued by small groups. Others were produced as an activity of a school or lyceum.

AAS has held manuscript periodicals since the nineteenth century; but because these were long shelved alongside printed periodicals, they were easily overlooked. In the 1990s AAS staff began to pull them together into a separate collection, in the process discovering not only how many titles were already at AAS, but also the frequency with which they were produced. As it became apparent that the more specimens AAS had, the more they collectively revealed about early American scribal culture, AAS began to seek them actively. The collection now numbers more than sixty titles.

One of the more unusual is “The Kentucky Spy and Porcupine Quill.” The masthead claims that it is “Devoted to the science of matrimony, union, wedlock and the ladies.” However, the chief story, entitled “Wonderful rumpus in the town of Irvine,” is a fictional account, humorous in tone, of a revolt by 5,000 heavily armed slaves which in the story turns out to be a hoax. The editor and contributor(s) are unnamed.

If you liked this post, you may also enjoy...

An August, 2016 stroll back thru time – 50, 100, 150, 200, & 250 years ago…

August 4, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 
Email This Post Email This Post | Print This Post Print This Post

Blog-8-4-2016-Beatles-JesusWhat news was reported in the month of August – 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 years ago (1966, 1916, 1866, 1816, 1766)? Such a walk back through time via the eyes of those who read the daily and weekly newspapers of the period can be quite revealing. This is why we often say, “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.” The following links will take you back in time to show the available newspapers from the Rare & Early newspapers website. There’s no need to buy a thing. Simply enjoy the stroll.
August:
1966 – 50 years ago
1916 – 100 years ago
1866 – 150 years ago
1816 – 200 years ago
1766 – 250 years ago

If you liked this post, you may also enjoy...

The Traveler… senseless tragedy…

August 1, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 
Email This Post Email This Post | Print This Post Print This Post

Blog-8-1-2016-Texas-SniperToday I traveled to New York City by the way of The New York Times dated August 2, 1966. There I found tragedy had stuck the campus of University of Texas. “An architectural honor student who had been undergoing psychiatric care carried an arsenal of rifles and pistols to the top of the 27-story University of Texas tower today and shot 12 persons to death before the police killed him. The student’s wife and mother were later found dead in their homes… The police identified the man as Charles J. Whitman…”. In all, he had shot an additional 34 people.

~The Traveler

If you liked this post, you may also enjoy...

The Holocaust… Truth be told…

July 28, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 
Email This Post Email This Post | Print This Post Print This Post

TRUE: The Nazis inflicted unspeakable atrocities on millions upon millions of people.

TRUE: Most of the world was shocked as details of the horrors were revealed after the war.

FALSE: The Nazis’ agenda was a deep-kept secret.

FALSE: Remaining silent and/or turning a blind eye to evil makes it go away.

How could the Hitler-orchestrated holocaust have happened without the world’s knowledge? Since the end of WWII many have distanced themselves from complicity due to inaction. Nations and individuals both often declare they had no idea such atrocities were taking place – stating evidence of Adolph Hitler’s extreme intentions were kept under wraps. However, truth be told, the entire world was not unaware of Hitler’s desire and willingness to do whatever it took to create a so-called “pure” race. Articles regarding his agenda reached American newspapers as far back as the early 1930’s. Blog-7-28-2016-Nazi-AgendaThis point was recently brought to our attention as we were perusing the New York Times for December 8, 1931. There we found a front page report with the two-column heading: “Nazis’ Would Assure Nordic Dominance, Sterilize Some Races, Ban Miscegenation”, with considerable details to follow. Perhaps the world didn’t realize the extent of the horrors that were occurring, but this article, as well as a score of others, certainly should not have gone unnoticed.

This certainly begs the question: “Are similar atrocities happening today? Are other mass-forms of oppression, brutality, or worse taking place within our reach? We can look away, but a verse from the Bible reminds us: “Remember, it is sin to know what you ought to do and then not do it (James 4:17).” We may put our head in the sand, but we are not without excuse. Hopefully the truth regarding our past mistakes will spur us to proper action today.

If you liked this post, you may also enjoy...

A curious find that lead to more than expected…

July 25, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 
Email This Post Email This Post | Print This Post Print This Post

Although not a poetry aficionado, I am aware that “Leaves Of Grass” by Walt Whitman is considered a seminal work in 19th century literature. So when I stumbled across a small article on page 7 of a New York Tribune issue dated Oct. 10, 1855 I took a moment to read it. Most of the report is taken up with a letter signed in type: R. W. Emerson, so my interest was piqued.

After a number of Google searches I discovered this report to be much more significant that I might have thought.

Although considered highly controversial during his era, “Leaves of Grass” has infiltrated popular culture & been recognized as one of the central works of American poetry. As such, the article is interesting, mentioning in part: “…call the attention of our readers to this original & striking collection of poems, by Mr. Whitman…could not avoid noticing certain faults which seemed to us to be prominent in the work. The following opinion, from a distinguished source, views the matter from a more positive and less critical stand-point:…” and what follows is the famous letter by Ralph Waldo Emerson–who inspired this work by Whitman–in which he comments: “…I find it the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom America has yet contributed…I am very happy in reading it, as great power makes us happy…” and even more, signed in type: R. W. Emerson. This original letter is in the Library of Congress.
This letter’s appearance in the Tribune would seem to be the only newspaper printing of the time, as records indicate that the: “…letter to Whitman from Ralph Waldo Emerson, 21 July, 1855 is among the most famous letters ever written to an aspiring writer…Without asking Emerson’s permission, Whitman gave this private letter to Charles Dana [managing editor of the New York Tribune] for publication in the New York Tribune on October, 1855.” (see this hyperlink).Blog-7-25-2016-Leaves-of-Grass

If you liked this post, you may also enjoy...

If we only new just how close… But what we don’t no won’t hurt us…

July 21, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 
Email This Post Email This Post | Print This Post Print This Post

Blog-7-21-2016-Letter-KHave you ever tried to be ind to someone or to treat them like an ing? Does your house have an itchen and do people need to nock before they enter?  Have you ever seen a football player run back an ickoff for a touchdown or a boxer ock-out his opponent with a single punch? Thanks to the impassioned early 19th century arguments in defense of keeping the letter “K” in our alphabet, the answer to all the above is an emphatic “no”. Of course we are left with the tension created by  “know” vs. “no” and “knew” vs. “new”, but such stressors are a small price to pay for being able to get down on one knee to propose or to greet a loved one with a kiss. I for one are sure glad we ept it! The complete article may be read at:  The Port Folio, May 23, 1801.

If you liked this post, you may also enjoy...

Next Page »