This Day in “News” History (Part II) – January 27th…

January 27, 2023 by · Leave a Comment 
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Earlier this week we featured the post: “This Day in ‘News’ History… January 23…”, along with brief directions as to how you could explore any date. It also featured a link the available newspapers listed on the RareNewspapers.com website which were dated on the 23rd of January (throughout time). We had so much fun pulling these together, we thought we would do this same for today (the 27th of January), but this time, in addition to including a link to the available issues, one of our staff randomly selected a little more than a dozen in a short video. Enjoy.

Link to Available Issues Dated January 27th (through time)

YouTube player

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This Day in “News” History… January 23…

January 23, 2023 by · Leave a Comment 
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There are many internet sources available to explore what happened on a particular day in history. However, as collectors and resellers of “Rare & Early Newspapers”, our curiosity lies in what people were reading in their morning newspaper on specific days in history. In nearly every instance they were discovering what happened the day prior – and if one reaches back into the 1600s, 1700’s, and early 1800s, when news travelled a bit more slowly, they very well could have been (finally) reading about “rumored” and/or anticipated events from days, weeks, or even months prior.

As an example…

What about January 23rd? The following link will take you to all of our available newspapers dated January 23rd:

NEWS REPORTED in NEWSPAPERS on January 23rd (through time)

Enjoy the trek. Oh, and if you want to try other dates, go here and plug in any month/day of interest.

 

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The January (2023) Newsletter from Rare & Early Newspapers…

January 20, 2023 by · Leave a Comment 
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Monthly Newsletter ~ Rare & Early Newspapers

Welcome to the first newsletter for 2023. Shown below are links to items added to the January catalog after it went to print, recent posts on the History’s Newsstand Blog, a new set of Discounted Newspapers (50% off), and in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s legacy, a link to issues containing slavery-themed articles and/or ads. Please enjoy.

A new set of issues have been reduced in price by 50% through February 16th. To view all discounted issues (priced as shown), go to:

Discounted Newspapers

Since the release of our most recent catalog, we have added a host of new items which did not appear within the hard-copy version. These “bonus” items may be viewed at:

Newly Added Catalog Items

All remaining items from January’s catalog may be viewed at:

Catalog 326

History’s Newsstand Blog – A selection of some of the recent posts on our History’s Newsstand Blog are:

From Dreams to Reality… Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Paves the Way…

WNEP TV turns the spotlight on Rare & Early Newspapers…

Scientific American’s “Not So Bright” (?) Ideas…

Snapshot 1982… A “Feel Good” Story to Kick-Off the New Year…

Harper’s Weekly… A Journal of Civilization…

In honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s legacy, this month we are featuring newspapers containing slavery-themed ads and/or articles. They may be viewed at:

“Lest We Forget” – Slavery-Themed Content

We thoroughly enjoy historic newspapers and greatly appreciate those who have a similar passion. Thanks for collecting with us!

Sincerely,

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team
RareNewspapers.com
570-326-1045

Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers . . .
           . . . History’s Newsstand
“…desiring to conduct ourselves honorably in all things.” Hebrews 13:18b

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From Dreams to Reality… Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Paves the Way…

January 16, 2023 by · Leave a Comment 
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The start of a new year lends itself to daydreaming – of the future… of goals… of a better world.  Much of the time these dreams fall by the wayside only to be replaced by a new focus or to be renewed at a later time. But sometimes dreams are so monumental and expansive they extend past the dreamer and are swept along by the tidal wave generated by the aspiration. Such is the case, I would argue, with Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream as stated on August 28, 1963. The work he began and the vision he cast extended well past his assassination as reported in the CHICAGO DAILY DEFENDER, April 6-12, 1968 (pictured to the right), and continued to move an entire country to a more congenial and “equal” state – one better reflecting the Founders’ dream: “We The People…!”. May we all strive for his dream for mankind with all the graciousness, boldness and humility he demonstrated, and may we work to construct such noble dreams as well.

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WNEP TV turns the spotlight on Rare & Early Newspapers…

January 13, 2023 by · Leave a Comment 
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A Northeastern Pennsylvania television station (WNEP) recently highlighted Tim Hughes and the Rare & Early Newspapers efforts to serve the world-wide collectible community. Although brief, any opportunity for Tim to share his love for the hobby is a bonus.

Millions of newspapers for sale in Lycoming County (PA)

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Scientific American’s “Not So Bright” (?) Ideas…

January 9, 2023 by · Leave a Comment 
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Over the years our staff has written quite a few posts focused on historic and transformative inventions which were featured within early issues of the Scientific American. The phonograph, lightbulb, telephone, modern sewing machine, and thousands of other devices have all had their moment in the sun thanks to this publication. However, as is the case for many of the good ideas from the past which came to fruition and now make our lives easier, a host had rather humble beginnings. With this in mind, our resident videographer decided to gather together three examples which fall into the “humble beginnings” bucket. Please enjoy.

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Snapshot 1982… A “Feel Good” Story to Kick-Off the New Year…

January 6, 2023 by · Leave a Comment 
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As we all know, bad news sells. The medium (social media, television, newspapers, etc.) doesn’t matter, if something tragic happens, everyone grabs their camera (phone) and lawn chair and heads to the scene. However, an ongoing diet of bad news (and negativity in general) is not good for the soul. With this reality in mind, one of my New Year’s resolutions is to spend more time focusing on the good – and thankfully, while perusing newspapers within our archives, I came across a “feel good” story which I thought was worth sharing. I’ll let the article I unearthed in a South Bend Tribune (August 8, 1982) do the talking (see below).

For the record, upon visiting the young boy in the hospital, future Hall of Famer Jim Rice recognized the family was of modest means, so on his way out of the hospital he stopped by the Business Office and requested the bills be sent to him. What a true hero!

You can also read additional details here: Jim Rice Saves Young Boy’s Life

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Announcing: Catalog #326 for January, 2023 – Rare & Early Newspapers for collectors…

January 2, 2023 by · Leave a Comment 
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January’s catalog (#326) is now available. Also shown below are links to a video featuring highlights from the catalog, our currently discounted newspapers, and recent posts to the History’s Newsstand Blog. Please enjoy.

CATALOG #326 – This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 300 new items, a selection which includes the following noteworthy issues: one of the earliest–and rarest–of the newsbooks we have offered, Washington’s inauguration in an American periodical, an ‘American Weekly Mercury’ from 1735, the earliest report of Washington’s death we have offered, the death of Martin Luther King, Jr. (in an African-American newspaper), the death of Marilyn Monroe, a very graphic issue on the fall of Richmond, and more.

 

Helpful Links to the Catalog:
————–
DISCOUNTED ISSUES – What remains of last month’s discounted issues may be viewed at: Discount (select items at 50% off)
————–

HISTORY’S NEWSSTAND – Recent Posts on the History’s Newsstand Blog may be accessed at: History’s Newsstand

————–

Thanks for collecting with us.

Sincerely,

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team

570-326-1045

[The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days

upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.]

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Resolutions… at the start of a New Year and Throughout Time…

December 30, 2022 by · Leave a Comment 
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It’s that time again. Some of us don’t want to admit it to others or even ourselves, but as the calender turns to the 1st of January, our minds naturally drift towards resolutions. I wonder if this impulse is built into human nature – the desire for a fresh start… to turn over a new leaf… to look forward to a new adventure pulled from one’s bucket list? As we consider what resolutions to write in pencil for the coming year, below are a few interesting “historical resolutions” to ponder. While I may have stretched the definition of “resolution” a bit, may our resolutions have as much staying power as these. Happy New Year and blessings on your new adventures.

 

April 1775 … The Gunpowder Incident This report mentions: “…that the powder in the publick magazine, in the city of Williamsburg, deposited there at the expense of the country & for the use of the people in case of invasion or insurrection, has been secretly removed under the clouds of the night…by order of the Governor…came to the following resolution: Resolved, that it is the opinion of this committee that the removing the said gunpowder…is an insult to every freeman in this country…” 

September 1774 … Historic Duché Letter to General Washington…  Duché first came to the attention of the First Continental Congress in September, 1774, when he was summoned to Carpenters’ Hall to lead the opening prayers. When the United States Declaration of Independence was ratified, Duché, meeting with the church’s vestry, passed a resolution stating that the King George III’s name was no longer to be read in the prayers of the church. Duché complied, crossing out said prayers from his Book of Common Prayer, committing an act of treason against England, an extraordinary and dangerous act for a clergyman who had taken an oath of loyalty to the King.

February 1876 … National League Baseball Established… During the establishment of the National Baseball League, an interesting resolution was adopted… The report continues mentioning the passage of a resolution concerning “championship play” while the second resolution prevented “…any two clubs from playing in a city in which neither of them belongs.”

January 1991 … U.N. Resolutions for Desert Storm… individually significant headlines on Desert Storm: the beginning of the air war: “WAR!”; the beginning of the land war: “INVASION!” and the “VICTORY!” once Iraq conceded and agreed to all U.N. resolutions.

 

 

 

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Harper’s Weekly… A Journal of Civilization…

December 26, 2022 by · Leave a Comment 
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Last week, as I was preparing a January 22, 1898 Harper’s Weekly for shipment, I noticed it was to be sent to Japan. We at Rare & Early Newspapers love knowing our collectors span the Globe; in fact, on a wall in the shipping department we track all the countries where our issues now reside.

Although I knew we had sent many collectible newspapers to this region, I was still curious to see if there might be a cultural motivation behind the purchase. As I paged through the issue to see what may have caught the attention of our Japanese collector, near the back I discovered 4 pages of beautiful prints with the heading, “The Porcelain Arts of Japan”. Full certain this gentleman would be pleased with such charming illustrations, I was delighted knowing this historical treasure would make its way across the World to his collection. As I closed the pages to resume my task my eyes fell on the tagline used by Harper’s Weekly Illustrated: “A Journal of Civilization”.

How appropriate to have noticed their description at this moment and how sublime to know we have a community of collectors which extends across all of today’s civilization.

 

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