Golden Nuggets… yet another “find”…

May 25, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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At Rare & Early Newspapers we always enjoy hearing about the various “finds” that permeate the collectible. While most significant content is know before one purchases an issue to add to their collection, due to the nature of the hobby, golden nuggets cannot help but be buried, yet undiscovered, deep within the pages of a newspaper. In some instances, the discoveries are quite significant – that is, significant to all having a general knowledge of history. In other cases, the find might be a little more subtle – yet still worthy of bringing to light.

The following account was sent to us a few weeks back. Feel free to send along your own stories as well (send to guy@rarenewspapers.com).

You mentioned you like to hear about “finds”, in a group of 100 cheap
newspapers I bought from you folks probably many years ago I found a find. I have started to place my collection into all the same mylar holders and cataloging it into my computer one by one. [It was during this time] I came across a New York Tribune from August 12th, 1865 that was included in one of those $199 for 100 newspaper lots I purchased from you. The front page has a couple of interesting articles like the “Annexation” of Canada, which led up to their confederation in 1867. The most interesting was the hours old accounts of the Steamship Pewabic which collided with the Steamship Meteor on Lake Huron. As I recall I think it was either a National Geographic or Discovery channel show. When they discovered the ship that sank in 1865 it was perfectly preserved even the woodwork with the cold non salt waters of the Great Lakes.

It would have been better in a Detroit paper, but for $2, I certainly will not complain. I have probably purchased over a thousand newspapers and it took me this long to discover a neat find – maybe not great, but I am pleased. I probably purchased this lot in the mid to late 1990’s. Looking at your website, especially the warehouse photos, there is just too much material to read everything even with a good size staff.

Thanks T.C. for sharing your story with the Rare & Early Newspapers’ Family.

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They put it in print… Interesting Kennedy obituary…

May 21, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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One of the more desired of the newspapers reporting the assassination of President John F. Kennedy has always been the “Dallas Morning News“, published in the city where he was killed. Blog-7-13-2015-JFK-ObitUnbeknownst to most–including us for many years–is the curious obituary found on page 6 of the last section. Inconspicuously listed among the 33 entries in the “Deaths & Funerals” section is the one shown in the photo. It is a paid obituary notice inserted by a private funeral home announcing the death of an American president.  The O’Neal Funeral Home handled President Kennedy’s remains in Dallas and furnished the casket in which he was sent to Washington. Although certainly not a local funeral, I suspect the funeral home sought the opportunity to gain some stature & credibility by letting all know they handled the remains of a  President of the United States.

Has anyone else discovered this obituary notice?

And of note as well, relating to the Kennedy assassination, is the death notice of “J.D. Tibbit”, the police officer killed by Oswald shortly after the Kennedy assassination. In fact it was for Tibbit’s death that Oswald was initially arrested, the connection to Kennedy’s assassination discovered afterwards.

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The Traveler… Jack Johnson bombs…

May 18, 2015 by · 2 Comments 
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Blog-5-18-2015-Jack-JohnsonToday I traveled to Fairmont, West Virginia, by the way of The Fairmont Times dated May 19, 1915, where I found a small article about Jack Johnson being in Paris. When asked if he was going to war, he replied “Man, for me war is over. I am at peace for the first time in several years… Anyway your name goes down in war history, for big German shells are called Jack Johnsons… wasn’t I in history before the war?”

~The Traveler

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Great Headlines Speak For Themselves… Clark Gable’s death report…

May 15, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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The best headlines need no commentary. Such is the case with the HERALD EXPRESS, Los Angeles, November 17, 1960: “CLARK GABLE DIES WITH A SMILE, SIGHBlog-4-24-2015-Clark-Gable-Death

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News in camp… The life of a Civil War soldier…

May 8, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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Blog-3-27-2015-Frank-LeslieWhen speaking of rare & early newspapers, we often say, “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported”. However, what about those who read them fresh off the presses? While collectors can appreciate holding history in their hands, we often forget that at one time these very newspapers were greeted with eager anticipation by those who were living through the events we now call history. This image from a Frank Leslie’s Newspaper dated October 31, 1863, titled “Frank Leslie In Camp”, depicts the arrival of “the news” by horseback, with several enthusiastic soldiers gathered around reading recently published issues of this wonderful illustrated newspaper. Feel free to peruse our other Civil War era images and descriptions of this title: Frank Leslie’s Illustrated

 

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The Traveler… a great man laid to rest…

May 4, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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Today I traveled to Springfield, Illinois, by the way of the Illinois State Journal of May 4, 1865, where I found they were preparing for the funeral of President Abraham Lincoln which was Blog-5-4-2015-Abraham-Lincoln-Funeralto occur later in the day. The editorial begins “We are without any more definite information in reference to the arrangements for the funeral of President Lincoln, to-day, than that contained in the programme published in another column…the procession will move at precisely ten o’clock, which will require that the remains be closed by eight…Work was recommenced on the tomb on the Mather Square yesterday…Not only the citizens of Springfield but of the whole state would be  rejoiced to learn that the change referred to had been authorized…”. Within another article is “…From our midst, a little more than four years ago, President Lincoln was called to the highest office in the gift of the people. Yesterday all that is mortal of him returned to us wrapped in the habiliments of the grave…The emblems of mourning everywhere  displayed…Illinois receives her murdered son again to her bosom, no less loving than when she sent him forth to the most distinguished honor. To-day we lay him reverently to rest…”

~The Traveler

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The Civil War (post conflict)… May, 1865

May 1, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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What news was reported in May, 1865 – 150 years ago? Such a walk back in time through the eyes of those who read the daily and weekly newspapers of the period can be Blog-5-1-2015-Jefferson-Davis-Capturedquite revealing. This is why we often say, “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.” The following link will take you back in time to show the available newspapers from the Rare & Early newspapers website. There’s no need to buy a thing. Simply enjoy the walk back in time:

May, 1865

A sampling of what you will find may include articles and info regarding: President Abraham Lincoln’s funeral, the capture of Jefferson Davis, the capture and killing of John Wilkes Booth, the promotion of Ulysses S. Grant, President Andrew Johnson’s amnesty proclamation, and more. Enjoy!

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They put it in print… The floating soap surfaces…

April 27, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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It’s interesting to find articles reporting the very beginning of some of the more commonplace items in present-day life, but which were given little consequence at the time. A good example is a rather inconspicuous article in an April 1, 1882 issue of “Scientific American.

Blog-4-29-2015-Ivory-SoapTitled simply “Floating Soap”, the article includes: “…the peculiarity of the soap they were using. When one of the men had soaped himself he would drop the soap into the water and it would ‘bob up serenely from below’ like a cork, ready for the next man to pick it up…The soap was called ‘ivory’, presumably on account of being of a creamy white color like ivory…We are pleased to note that Messrs. Proctor and Gamble, of Cincinnati, have at last discovered how to make a soap that will float & at the same time be durable & serviceable, & reasonably cheap.”

Ivory soap remains today–some 133 years later–a very common product on store shelves around the world. And it still floats.

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Ford’s Theater… then and now…

April 24, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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Blog-4-24-2015-1865-Ford's-Theater150 years ago, much of the nation was still reeling from the death of Abraham Lincoln. A mere 10 days previous time stood still and tears flowed freely at the news that the President had been killed. Did many travel to Washington, D.C. to mourn his passing? Did some visit the very site of his tragic and untimely demise to place a candle… flowers… mourn? The Philadelphia Enquirer, April 17, 1865, not on only printed a sketch of the captured John Wilkes Booth, but they also included a front-page schematic (right) of the back-alley escape route where a horse was waiting for the infamous villain and his accomplice. While the region has gone through several transformations over the course of the last 150 years, this same alley exists today. The current-day photo shown below was sent to us be a collector friend who also included the following note:

I have attached a picture of the rear of Ford’s Theater as it looks today (showing the original windows/doorways that have been bricked-up)…and I want to point out that the alleyway shown on that April 17th issue is incredibly, to this day, the only exit on the entire block and proportioned to what it was in that newspaper.

If you’ve never visited Ford’s Theater in Washington, D.C., it is certainly worth the trip.Blog-4-24-2015-21st-Century-Ford's-TheaterNote: During my days as a Middle School Teacher, can anyone guess the most common question students asked upon visiting this spot during a school trip?

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The Traveler… treaty ratified…

April 20, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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Blog-4-20-2015-Andrew-Jackson-TreatyToday I traveled to Baltimore, Maryland via Niles’ Weekly Register of April 22, 1815.  There I found significant coverage on the Battle of New Orleans as the end of the War of 1812 was drawing to the end. Also within the content was “…Copy of a letter from major general Jackson to secretary of war, dated New-Orleans, March 16, 1815…  Sir — I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 16th ultimo, advising me of the ratification of the treaty of peace between Great Britain and the United States. In conformity with your directions, I have forwarded to the officer commanding his Britannic majesty’s forces in this quarter information of that event… I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, ANDREW JACKSON, Maj. gen. commanding.”

Also reported is the battle encounter of the United States’ frigate Constitution and Britannic “ships Cyane and Levant, which she captured after an action of 50 minutes.”

~The Traveler

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