The Traveler… Babe Ruth signs on the dotted line…

January 15, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 
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Today I journeyed to New York City by the means of The New York Times dated January 15, 1918. I found in the Sport’s Section a very small but significant report “Babe Ruth Signs Contract”. “Babe Ruth, the big left-handed pitcher of the Boston American League Baseball Club, has just signed a contract for the coming season. He is the first of the Red Sox to come to terms.” Interesting that his signing received such a small mention considering his eventual prominence.

~The Traveler

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An Alternative to Capital Punishment Explored in the 1700’s…

January 11, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 
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Among several reports from America posted in The London Chronicle for January 19, 1768 is a report from Denmark which brings to light their experimentation with an alternative approach to the death sentence for the most heinous of crimes. Rather than editorializing, I’ll let the the text do the talking…

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Life-perspective from 50, 100, 150+ years ago – 2018 edition…

January 8, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 
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What news was reported in the month of January – 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 years ago (1968, 1918, 1868, 1818, 1768)? Such a walk back through time via the eyes of those who read the daily and weekly newspapers of the period can be quite revealing. This is why we often say, “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.” The following links will take you back in time to show the available newspapers from the Rare & Early newspapers website. There’s no need to buy a thing. Simply enjoy the stroll.
January:
1968 – 50 years ago
1918 – 100 years ago
1868 – 150 years ago
1818 – 200 years ago
1768 – 250 years ago
Wanting for more? Why not take a year-long gander at 1668, 1718, 1768, 1818, 1868, 1918, and/or 1968?

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Announcing: Catalog #266 (for January, 2018) is now available…

January 4, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 
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http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpgRare Newspapers’ monthly offering of collectible newspapers, Catalog 266, is now available. This latest collection of authentic newspapers is comprised of nearly 350 new items. Some of the noteworthy content includes:

the Battle of Bunker Hill
a rare issue of the “Pennsylvania Magazine” from 1775
the Gettysburg Address on the front page
the first magazine printing of the Star Spangled Banner
a North Carolina issue on the North Carolina secession
the Great Fire of London in a London newspaper (front page)

To view the above key issues and a whole lot more, go to: Catalog 266

(The catalog links shown above will redirect to the latest catalog in approximately 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

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The Traveler… the King celebrates…

January 1, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 
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Today I traveled to London by the means of The Post Boy dated January 1, 1718. There I found that the King of Spain had lately been experiencing some health issues but is now reportedly been better. Also “Yesterday being his Majesty’s Birth-day, when he enter’d into the 36th Year of his Age, he receiv’d the Compliments of the Court there-upon; and is expected here in few days.”

I wish all a Happy New Year!

~The Traveler

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Sometimes it’s what’s missing that catches the eye… Alaska…

December 28, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 
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One of the greatest hobby-related pleasures experienced by those who collect rare and early newspapers is finding previously unidentified content within an issue. While not on the same scale as finding gold, “mining” a newspaper for reports that were missed by the seller is certainly rewarding. Time and time again collectors tell us they purchased a newspaper for under $30 for a relatively minor report only to find a hidden gem buried deeper within the issue. Such discoveries, at times, can be financially rewarding, but in a world where the unexpected is often tethered to bad news, such relatively common incidents in the newspaper collecting hobby are a sweet salve to the weary soul (okay – perhaps a little overstated). Still, it certainly is to a seller’s advantage to keep such incidents to a minimum. Prior to offering a newspaper for sale, we compare it to various historical databases and our 40+ year chronological record of findings to help us estimate when a report of historical significance might be found. Since news traveled a bit more slowly in previous centuries, even our best intentions are left wanting.

This being said, there are times when, as we go through the process of searching for historical content, what surprises us most is what we are unable to find – or the minimal coverage which is present. Its not that we miss the coverage, rather, its that what we now see as noteworthy events – often buoyed up by movies, history books, etc., were mere blips on the screen at the time they occurred, and the contemporary coverage only serves to confirm its position in the coverage food-chain of the day.

The purchase of Alaska from Russia, finalized on March 30, 1867, is such an event. After spending over an hour searching for a mention in a set of Springfield (MA) Republicans from 1867, coverage finally showed up on page five of the April 10th issue (see image). Perhaps this is why the purchase, promoted heavily by and signed by the U.S. Secretary of State at the time, William H. Seward, became known as “Seward’s Folly.” Of course just because many of his contemporaries thought paying 2 cents an acre was foolish doesn’t mean he was wrong. Sometimes the masses simply don’t get it right – as time would reveal.

 

 

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Christmas Day… Not what one might expect…

December 24, 2017 by · 1 Comment 
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Over the years we have written various Christmas-themed posts for the 25th (or 24th) of December. Many of these (and a few extras) may be viewed at Christmas-Themed Posts. However, almost by accident, as I was preparing for this year I happened to notice that the “reason for the season” and what has appeared on the pages of many newspapers published on Christmas don’t necessarily correlate. Before accessing the following link (which will take you to a chronological listing of such issues we have listed on our website – most of which are no longer available), think back through the past 300-400 years and try to come up with a handful events which were reported on Christmas morning. Once done, go to the link to see if you were successful. Enjoy – oh, and Merry Christmas.

Christmas Morning Newspapers

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The Traveler… in a heart-beat…

December 21, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 
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Earlier this month I traveled to Russell, Kansas, via the Russell Daily News dated December 4, 1967. The news making the headlines was “Heart Transplant Appears Success”.  “Doctors with crossed fingers today tended a middle-aged man given a young woman’s heart and predicted ‘pretty good’ chances of success for history’s first cardiac transplant operation. The patient’s wife called the operation a miracle…”

Unfortunately due to the medication that was used to suppress his body to keep it from rejecting the heart caused him to become susceptible to illness and he died from double pneumonia eighteen days later with the heart functioning normally.

~The Traveler

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The Traveler… dry as a bone…

December 18, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 
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Today I went to Atlanta, Georgia, by the way of The Atlanta Constitution dated December 18, 1917. I found a big announcement had just been made “‘Bone Day’ Nation Put Up To States” as the
“Prohi Amendment Adopted By House By Vote 282 to 128” had occurred.  “Nation-wide prohibition won in the house today and only the adjustment of a slight difference in resolution between the house and senate now stands in the way of submitting to state legislatures an amendment to the federal constitution forbidding the manufacture, sale or importation of intoxicating liquors for beverage purposes in the United States or its territories…”

Here’s to you!

~The Traveler

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19th century Harper’s Weekly reviewed…

December 11, 2017 by · 2 Comments 
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Over the years we have made several mentions of Harper’s Weekly, one of the most beloved illustrated newspapers of the 19th century. This title is also one of the most sought-after collectibles through our website,

RareNewspapers.com. Although I’m sure many others exist, I was pleasantly surprised to find a contemporary review of this publication on the front page of the Springfield Republican dated February 13, 1867. Even more pleasing was my discovery that, unlike It’s a Wonderful Life, the works of Vincent Van Gogh, and Thoreau’s Walden, along with a host of other now-popular people, songs, products, books, etc., which initially  found it difficult to gain traction, at least in one journalist’s opinion was seen as an unrivaled, gem of a publication. Their review stated, in part:

 

“The Harpers offer their Weekly in bound volumes for the year 1866 for $7. As a record and illustration of the times, it has no rival; its pages are history, literature and politics, all of the safest and soundest sort. Good as are the Harper’s pictures for America, valuable as its record of passing events, and interesting as are generally its sketches and stories…” (view entire article).

The link RareNewspapers.com will take you to our website where nearly every Harper’s Weekly has been photographed and described for your reading and viewing pleasure. Please enjoy.

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