They put it in print… Nazi generals attempt an escape to Japan…

July 27, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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World War II created a countless number of stories of heroism, sorrow, courage, and intrigue, many of which will never be known save for just  a few. Blog-7-27-2015-Nazi-GeneralsThe "The Detroit Free Press" of May 17, 1945 reported one such event which would surprise many historians today. Its headline notes: "Seize U-Boat Taking Key Nazis To Japan" with a subhead: "Luftwaffe Chiefs Captured at Sea". This was just 10 days after the surrender of Germany, and less than 3 months before Japan would surrender to end World War II.  The related article mentions in part: "A 1,600 ton Nazi U-boat, presumably attempting to escape to Japan, surrendered to destroyer-escorts of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet...Aboard were 3 major general of the Luftwaffe and two dead Japanese, who had committed hara-kiri...". To this day few know of the attempt of Nazi generals to seek refuge in Japan, yet it was a front page headline in Detroit at the time. Ironically, the photo shown is actually of the capture/surrender of the infamous U-505, an event which had occurred in June of 1944, but was not announced/released until the previous day. A movie in the making?
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Great Headlines Speak For Themselves… Cocoanut Grove fire…

July 23, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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The best headlines need no commentary. Such is the case with the LOS ANGELES TIMES, November 30, 1942: "FIRE KILLS 431 IN NIGHT CLUB"...Blog-7-23-2015-Cocoanut-Grove-Club-Fire
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They put it in print… Zenger’s newspaper ordered to be burned…

July 20, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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Blog-5-25-2015-John-Peter-ZengerA sure-fire way to get yourself in trouble--at least in early 18th century America--would be to criticize the governor. John Peter Zenger, publisher of "The New York Weekly Journal", had a problem with a decision made by of the colonial governor, William Cosby, and expressed his frustration in his newspaper. On November 17, 1734, On Cosby's orders, the sheriff arrested Zenger. After a grand jury refused to indict him, the attorney general Richard Bradley charged him with libel in August of 1735. Thus began his imprisonment and a trial that would lead to Zenger's acquittal and would more importantly create the foundation for the freedom of the press we enjoy today. The "Encyclopedia of Censorship" reports that: "...In October 1734 a committee was appointed to investigate Zenger's newspaper and to look into the charges of seditious libel that had been alleged against it. The committee found numbers 7, 47, 48, and 49, which contained a reprinted article on the liberty of the press, to be libelous as charged and ordered them to be burned. Zenger was arrested and jailed." See the link below which shows the entirely of issue number 47, dated Sept. 23, 1734. You can read the continued article which got Zenger thrown into jail, but ultimately won not only his own freedom but a significant freedom for newspaper publishers everywhere:

The New-York Weekly Journal, September 23, 1734

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Nellie Bly… an interview with Susan B. Anthony…

July 15, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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Blog-7-15-2015-Nellie-Bly-Susan-B-AnthonyNellie Bly (Elizabeth Cochrane Seaman), the American Journalist who became famous through her writing for Pulitzer's New York World, is best remembered for her exposé regarding the horrific conditions within mental institutions obtained by faking her own insanity - taking investigative journalism to a whole new level, and her documentation of her record-breaking 72-day trip around the world as she emulated Jules Verne's fictional character Phileas Fogg from Around the World in 80 Days. However, few are aware of her intimate and informative interview with Susan B. Anthony, perhaps the only woman to rival her pioneering spirit, which was printed in the New York World, February 2, 1896. The article in its entirety may be viewed at:

Nellie Bly - Interview with Susan B. Anthony

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The Traveler… Edison on board…

July 13, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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Blog-7-13-2015-EdisonToday I traveled to New York City by the way of The New York Times of July 13, 1915. There I found that "(Thomas) Edison Will Head Navy Test Board". "...'The United States is far behind in these matters,' said Mr. Edison. 'I believe it is highly important for a board of civilians, made up of engineers from leading industries, to be formed for the purpose of looking into the feasibility of ideas developed by young men...'" ~The Traveler
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The aftermath of the Civil War… July, 1865

July 9, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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Blog-7-3-2015-ConspiratorsWhat news was reported in July, 1865 - 150 years ago? The horrors of the Civil War were now in the past, but the emotions and sorrow of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln were still fresh. Where would the nation go from here? How would we move forward? Was unity possible?
Such a walk back in time through the eyes of those who read the daily and weekly newspapers of the period can be quite revealing. This is why we often say, “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported." The following link will take you back in time to show the available newspapers from the Rare & Early newspapers website. There's no need to buy a thing. Simply enjoy the walk back in time:

July, 1865

A sampling of what you will find may include articles and info regarding: The end of the Massachusetts 54th Regiment, the hanging of the Lincoln assassination "conspirators", the capture of Kirby Smith, P.T. Barnum's tragic fire, the emancipation of slaves, the return to a degree of normalcy as shown through interest in post-war sports (baseball and others), and more. Please enjoy your travel into the past as you browse through the currently available original newspapers!
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The Traveler… laying the cornerstone… a time to remember…

July 6, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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Blog-7-6-2015-GettysburgThis week I traveled back to July 5, 1865 by the way of The New York Times. There I found the reporting of "The Celebration Yesterday on the Great Battlefield" at Gettysburg. There they had "The Ceremonies of the Laying the Corner Stone of the Gettysburg Monument." Many generals were on hand for this occasion with General Howard being the orator of the day. Within his speech, he included Abraham Lincoln's infamous "Gettysburg's Address", which is included in the text of the article. Also in the issue is the coverage of the Fourth of July celebration in New York City, including the "Ovation to the Returned Veterans" and "The Wounded Veterans." ~The Traveler
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A rousing call for freedom…

July 1, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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We occasionally find nice editorials or letters in newspapers of the colonial era which express a concern for the relationship between England and the colonies. Most appear during the midst of the Revolutionary War, but they can be found, at times, in newspapers dated between the Stamp Act of 1765  and the outbreak of war ten years later. The "Essex Gazette" of March 14, 1775 contains on page two a very rousing "call to arms" in support of freedom from the "tyranny" of England (one is shown below -both are viewable through the link). Hint is made for the need for freedom from British control some 15 months prior to the Declaration of Independence. Take a moment to read this great letter, headed: "May Truth's bright Beams and Freedom's Rage, Confound the Villains of the Age." A very appropriate piece as we now celebrate the 239th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence.Blog-7-3-2015-Cause-of-Freedom
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Golden Nuggets… the “hits” just keep on coming…

June 29, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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At Rare & Early Newspapers we always enjoy hearing about the various "finds" that permeate the collectible. While most significant content is know before one purchases an issue to add to their collection, due to the nature of the hobby, golden nuggets cannot help but be buried, yet undiscovered, deep within the pages of a newspaper. In some instances, the discoveries are quite significant - that is, significant to all having a general knowledge of history. In other cases, the find might be a little more subtle - yet still worthy of bringing to light. The following account was sent to us not too long ago. Feel free to send along your own stories as well (send to guy@rarenewspapers.com).

Hi, I just wanted to let you know the papers arrived in great shape as usual but what was really great was once I went through  them were the other stories I found.

In the May 8, 1930 New York Times on page 11 there was a story about how a newspaper in Havana, Cuba was fearing Al Capone was about to move there they feared he would turn it into "a second Chicago."

In the inner pages of the Dec. 27, 1941 L.A. Times there was a story about five Iowa brothers joining the Navy and will serve together. This is an article about the Sullivan brothers who were later killed inaction in the Pacific and the Hollywood movie The Fighting Sullivans was made about them.

This is why I love collecting newspapers it's not only about the main story you might have kept the paper for but the inner page stories you might have not paid attention to at first.

Thanks C.H. for sharing your story with the Rare & Early Newspapers' Family.
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Great Headlines Speak For Themselves… death of Groucho Marx…

June 26, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 
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The best headlines need no commentary. Such is the case with the LOS ANGELES TIMES, Aug. 20, 1977: "GROUCHO MARX DIES"...Blog-6-26-2015-Groucho-Marx-Death
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