Snapshot 1847… Woman’s Suffrage meets dripping sarcasm…

November 26, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

The following snapshot comes from the Boston Evening Transcript dated August, 9, 1847. Perhaps the journalist should have included a little less sarcasm in the reporting on this historic woman’s suffrage gathering.

Who should have the right to vote? Food for thought…

November 5, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Who should have the right to vote? Should Native Americans? Blacks?  Poor Whites? Women? Citizens who either don’t own land or who are unemployed (i.e., don’t pay taxes)? Although all of these at one time did not have the right to vote, today, we all (hopefully) unanimously agree the answer is a resounding YES – and thankfully, although it took time, they now can. However, although we are unified in our appreciation that all citizens should be granted this privilege, is there a responsibility that comes with this right – a civic duty to not only exercise this “right”, but to do so as an informed voter? THE DAILY GRAPHIC’s (New York) November 2, 1875 illustrated front page weighed in on this issue with a degree of sarcasm. Enjoy.

They Put It In Print… Schools need to teach The Constitution…

October 29, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Human nature has a tendency to drive us to forget – to enjoy the bountiful privileges earned on the backs, and at times the very lives of those who have gone before us, but to forget the great cost paid to obtain them. After a few generations pass, the backdrop which drove such impassioned effort to earn them is also lost.

The year was 1922. It had been a mere 1.5 centuries since the ratification of The U.S. Constitution had paved the way for a new form of society, and there was already a deep-rooted concern that the unless citizens studied and learned the basic tenets of the Constitution, it would not stand. How do we know? The Virginia Pilot dated September 22, 1922 put it in print. Although its now nearly 100 years since the article was written, the call remains – perhaps even more-so.

They put it in print… The Boston Tea Party – now they’re really in trouble…

October 8, 2018 by · 1 Comment 

It’s one thing to infuriate the British. It’s an entirely different matter to agitate local merchants. Yet, I can only imagine the trouble that would have ensued had PETA been around at the time of the Boston Tea Party.

Thanks to the Virginia Gazette dated May 5, 1774 for putting the following in print in print.

Are cigarettes bad for you? Thomas Edison & Philip Morris disagree…

September 24, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

We recently found a rather interesting half-page notice in a Boston Evening Transcript, July 9, 1914, in which the Philip Morris company pushed back on an article from a few months prior in which Thomas Edison is quoted as saying he believes cigarettes to be bad for one’s health. I don’t know about you, but the ad comes of a bit self-serving. Of course time would prove Edison to have actually been more gracious than what truth would eventually reveal.

Snapshot 1927… Several are killed and they’re worried about the score???

September 14, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

The following snapshot comes from The Leominster Daily Enterprise dated January 27, 1927

Perhaps the editor should have picked up on this double entendre tainted headline?

Taking a stand… often at a cost…

June 25, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

What do Michael Jones, Sandy Koufax, Eric Liddell, and Hakeem Olajuwon all have in common? They are all major athletes who made professional sacrifices due to their faith. In some cases the sacrifices made had only a minimal cost, but in others the cost was quite significant. This reality was recently brought to our attention through the eyes of a Detroit News from October 3, 1965. It tells of Sandy Koufax not being available to start the 1st game of the World Series due to his observance of Yom Kipper. Although the article states it really wasn’t a big deal, his missing the first game would mean he would not be available to pitch 3 times if the series took 7 games, unless he pitched with only 2 days rest – rarely a successful venture. After his team lost the first two games of the series, it sure appeared as if his decision would prove quite costly. However, in the end, he did pitch game 7 on only 2 days rest – won the game, and was named the Series MVP. However, what if they had lost? What about others who’s teams have lost or they themselves were excluded from major events due to their faith? Do you think many ever regret their decision to put their faith first? I’m guessing no, but perhaps others know otherwise.

Innocence… Flag Day 1921

June 14, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

One of the understated, yet profound beauties of the American experiment is self-government is not that everything is perfect; rather, its the built in mechanisms which enable peaceful positive change over time. At time the wheels of progress move all-too-slowly, but they move. The presence of political and social tension are not signs of weakness, but are part and parcel of how we function in a (hopefully) civil, free society. For most the flag represents not perfection – but the ideals which provide avenues for change. It is with these thoughts in mind in the face of current tensions that I was struck by the innocence of the moment captured on the front page of The Omaha Sunday Bee’s Rotogravure Section for June 12, 1921. Something about it seems pure and right. Whether you agree, or agree to disagree, perhaps a day will come when our children, or our children’s children, will pay the ultimate sacrifice to protect our right to do so. Happy Flag Day!

Anticipation enhanced by delayed gratification… King Tut…

June 11, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

A bride-to-be as her wedding day approaches… a young child the night before Christmas… a family as it heads off towards a long-awaited vacation destination (Can anyone hear, “Are we there yet?”)… a teacher during the last week of May – as the end of the year nudges closer… a groom as his wedding night draws near – there is no doubt that delayed gratification buoyed by a humongous helping of perseverance tends to make long anticipated events taste even sweeter. Such was to be the case for Howard Carter (archeologist – backed by financier George Herbert) as he entered the newly discovered tomb in late November of 1922 to find drawings related to the funeral of King Tutankhamun painted on the walls. After more than a decade of searching – failure built upon failure, could this be it? While newspapers would not report the opening of the inner tomb until February the following year, the front page of The New York Times from December 1, 1922 had the announcement of Carter’s initial find – with mention of the King Tut related drawings. One can only imagine the escalation in excitement this created – and the building of anticipation which occurred over the next few months. Unlike the opening of Al Capone’s vaults in 1986, this find would not disappoint!

Memorial Day… The Blue and the Gray…

May 27, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

We recently discovered an original issue of The Atlantic Monthly for September, 1867, which contained the earliest nationally distributed printing (and maybe the first ever) of ‘The Blue and the Gray,” by Francis Miles Finch. Although Memorial Day had not been officially proclaimed (via General Order #11, May 5, 1868), the practice of placing flowers and wreaths on the tombstones if the fallen was somewhat common. What was uncommon was the act of a group of women in Columbus, Mississippi, which is best described in the preface to Finch’s poem (quoted from the New York Tribune):

“The women of Columbus, Mississippi, animated by nobler sentiments than are many of their sisters, have shown themselves impartial in their offerings made to the memory of the dead. They strewed flowers alike on the graves of the Confederate and of the National soldiers.”

In recognition of Memorial Day, please enjoy the full text of this grand expression of appreciation for those who have fallen in battle – be they blue or gray:

 

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