The October (2021) Newsletter from Rare & Early Newspapers…

October 15, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

Monthly Newsletter ~ Rare & Early Newspapers

Welcome to the October, 2021 edition of our monthly newsletter. Hopefully you continue to find collecting/reading historic newspapers as a respite from the ongoing onslaught of troubling news which continues to consume the airwaves. So, in this regard, please enjoy the following:
Newly Added Catalog Items (nearly 50 added this week) – A selection of topics/issues include: President Lincoln formalizing Thanksgiving as a National holiday, Babe Ruth being “purchased” by the Boston Red Sox (in a Boston newspaper), the Maryland “Jew Bill”, Thomas Edison invents the phonograph, Ben Franklin’s “Morals of Chess”, an article/speech related to the extermination of Jews (1936), and more.

 

Twenty-Five Issues Discounted to $10 – Great for gift giving. For what its worth, in our opinion “gifting” one (or more) to yourself is acceptable. 🙂

 

Newly Discounted Newspapers ~ 50% off (through November 11th) – We’ve tried to include topics covering a wide-variety of collecting interests.

 

Did You Know? Did you know many of Walt Whitman’s poems first appeared in the newspapers of his day? We have identified a selection of newspapers which include his poetry at: WALT WHITMAN

 

I thoroughly enjoy historic newspapers and greatly appreciate those who have a similar passion. Thanks for collecting with us!

 

Sincerely,

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team
RareNewspapers.com
570-326-1045

Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers . . .
           . . . History’s Newsstand
“…desiring to conduct ourselves honorably in all things.” Hebrews 13:18b

“Things I Never Knew”… Fredrick Douglass Edition…

October 7, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

It’s amazing how one can work intimately with history for years-on-end and still find so much you don’t know – and I’m certainly a case in point.  I find that after 2 years of exploring (technically called working) at RareNewspapers, I am still surprised & delighted on nearly a daily basis.  Just yesterday, as I began to dig into the background of one of America’s heroes, Frederick Douglass, I discovered he had served as U.S. Marshal –  a fact which may have been known to many of the readers of the History’s Newsstand blog, but was new(s) to me:

“When Republican Rutherford B. Hayes was elected president, he named Douglass as United States Marshal for the District of Columbia, the first person of color to be so named. The Senate voted to confirm him on March 17, 1877.[147] Douglass accepted the appointment, which helped assure his family’s financial security.[51] During his tenure, Douglass was urged by his supporters to resign from his commission, since he was never asked to introduce visiting foreign dignitaries to the President, which is one of the usual duties of that post. However, Douglass believed that no covert racism was implied by the omission, and stated that he was always warmly welcomed in presidential circles.” (Wiki)

I love how I get to spend my days!

 

Announcing: Catalog #311 (for October, 2021) is now available…

October 1, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpg

Catalog 311 (for October) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 350 new items, a selection which includes: the Articles of Confederation, a nice account of Lincoln’s assassination, a graphic issue on the sinking of the Titanic, George Washington is elected President, Winslow Homer’s famous ‘Snap The Whip’, Washington crosses the Delaware, an issue almost entirely devoted to the Lincoln assassination (with a print of Booth), the first newspaper published in Alaska (with Seward’s speech to the citizens of Sitka), an issue with the iconic Uncle Sam print, a Civil War broadside, the famous Hamilton and Burr duel, the creation of the United States Marine Corps, nice content on Lewis & Clark, and more.

 

The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days,

upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.

The September (2021) Newsletter from Rare & Early Newspapers…

September 17, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

Monthly Newsletter ~ Rare & Early Newspapers

Welcome to the September, 2021 edition of our monthly newsletter. Please enjoy.

Newly Added Catalog Items (30 more added just this week) – some of the topics/issues include: a rare (1792) printing of what many consider Alexander Hamilton’s greatest work (“Report on Manufactures”), President Harding formalizes the United States support of creating a Jewish homeland, a Confederate newspaper from Grenada (Mississippi), the iconic cover of the Village Voice (shows Bob Dylan, The Beatles, and Timothy Leary), a graphic issue on the battle of Gettysburg, Abraham Lincoln’s 1863 “We have forgotten God…” proclamation, a 1774 publication with the text of the “Declaration & Resolves of the First Continental Congress” (aka ‘Declaration of Colonial Rights’) in response to the hated “Intolerable” Acts by Congress, Jackie Robinson’s MLB (baseball) debut, Benjamin Franklin’s Plan for the Union (1754), and more.

Newly Discounted Newspapers ~ 50% off (through October 14th) – topics/issues include: a newspaper printed on plastic, boxing’s first world championship (with a mention of the Pony Express as a bonus, a Mormon periodical from Denmark, a French newspaper from the 1600’s, the 1778 Siege of Newport (Rhode Island) along with a map of Dominica, a report re: John Wesley in Savannah (Georgia), George Washington’s state-of-the-union address to Congress, the Jewish Year of Jubilee convention and Harding’s letter to the Jews, The Wizard of Oz debuts on television, the Death of Henry Ford, the stock market reaches 10,000 for the first time, the Battle of Tippecanoe (sorry, no Tyler too from what I can see), and more.
The Wright Brothers’ Famous Flight Encircling The Statue of Liberty (1909) – I love this collectible! I am currently reading “The Wright Brothers”, by David McCullough, and in the process was reminded of their famous flight encircling The Statue of Liberty in 1909. While we have offered the well-known Harper’s Weekly issue which covered this event, I was inspired to explore our archives to see if we had coverage in one of our titles – and voilà, not only did we have coverage, we found it in an original newspaper from New York… with multiple photos to boot. What fun! I immediately read the report and compared it to McCollough’s description of this historic event. Analysis? Spot On!
If interested, the following links provide a glimpse of our discovery:

Thanks for collecting with us.

Sincerely,

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team
RareNewspapers.com
570-326-1045

Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers . . .
           . . . History’s Newsstand
“…desiring to conduct ourselves honorably in all things.” Hebrews 13:18b

Announcing: Catalog #310 (for September, 2021) is now available…

September 3, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpg

Catalog 310 (for September) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 300 new items, a selection which includes: the “Handshake of the Century” (between Jackie Robinson & George Shuba), Edmund Burke’s historic: On American Taxation… First Continental Congress’ appeal, Nice front page reporting on the Custer Massacre, Progressive “Bull Moose” Party is founded in 1912, New York City’s Graffiti artists, “The North Star” becomes “Frederick Douglass’ Paper”, the first convention of clubs: the birth of organized baseball, Lincoln steps upon the national stage… The Cooper Union speech, Synagogues hold memorial services… with much on the assassination & funeral of Lincoln, Extremely early mention of George Washington… French & Indian War, the full text of the Louisiana Purchase, the formation of the Mormon Church, the first full-fledged Broadway musical, and more, and more.

 

The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days,

upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.

Announcing: Catalog #309 (for August, 2021) is now available…

July 30, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpg

Catalog 309 (for August) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 300 new items, a selection which includes: an American broadside with King’s announcement of American freedom, a Philadelphia newspaper from 1729, the Emancipation Proclamation in the N.Y. Herald, a terrific & very graphic issue on the Hindenburg disaster, Don Larsen’s World Series perfect game, front page report on the death of Jesse James, and more.

 

The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days,

upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.

Why collect Rare & Early Newspapers? July 23rd…

July 23, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

It has often been said (by Tim Hughes and other collectors of historical newspapers) that “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported”. When past events are studied through the eyes of those who experienced them first-hand, revisionism, “woke”-ism, and the politicizing of history is kept to a minimum. The breadth and depth of our understanding of the past is undoubtedly enhanced when we view past events through the lens of contemporaneous reporting. This is one of the great satisfactions those of us at Rare & Early Newspapers enjoy on a daily basis, and the driving force behind why more and more people are joining the ranks of those who collect newspapers.

While history certainly has its share of triumph and tragedy, success and failure, progress and regression, together they combine to form the tapestry of our shared human experience. Warts have been part of daily life since we made our all-to-quick exit from The Garden, but hopefully, as we study history in order to learn from the good and the bad, the knowledge we gain by observing the past will inform our actions of the present to help pave the way for a few less blemishes in the future. Our hope is that those who collect historic newspapers 100… 200… 500 years from now will find we were good stewards of our own current events.

It is with the above in mind we will occasionally post the list of newspapers we have for a specific day in history.

Today we explore:  July 23rd

 

18th Century Gentleman’s Magazines – So Much For So Little…

July 16, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

Over 40 years ago we discovered one of the best titles of the 18th century for period news reporting. The title wasn’t even a newspaper but rather, “The Gentleman’s Magazine” from London.

Having begun in 1731, Gentleman’s Magazines ran uninterrupted for nearly 200 years publishing pages capturing news reports concerning America which could never be found in period American newspapers, and were rarely found in period British newspapers.

From its earliest years this popular title printed reports as varied as the creation of the colony of Georgia, William Penn laying out the city of Philadelphia, slave revolts, and reports of pirates operating in the Caribbean.

Issues have much on Ben Franklin & his work with electricity including the lightening rod & famous kite experiments as well as rarely published poems by the famed slave poet Phyllis Wheatley.

Death reports of the famous–and infamous–abound, from Mozart to Handel, from John Paul Jones to George Washington, Patrick Henry and Benedict Arnold… the list is awe inspiring.

Military events are abundant including much on the French & Indian War (with very early Colonel George Washington reports) & all the Revolutionary War battles from the Boston Massacre through the Treaty of Peace.

Keep in mind the American colonies were part of the global British Empire until 1776 so there was much interest in not only American events but notable world events which affected the broad scope of British interests.

Some of the best gems to be found are very inconspicuous reports such as the hanging of what would famously become known as the Liberty Bell. Under the heading: “America” and with a “Philadelphia, May 10” dateline from 1753 is a report reading: “Last week was raised and fixed, in the State-House Steeple, the great bell, weighing 2080 lb. cast here, with this inscription, ‘Proclaim liberty throughout all the land, to the inhabitants thereof.”

The full text of the hated Stamp Act is found within the pages of a Gentleman’s Magazine, and just one year later is found the formal repeal of the Stamp Act by King George III. Other Acts of Parliament harmful to colonial relations are reported as well.

Historic documents are certainly not lacking, among them being the Articles of Confederation, the “Causes & Necessity for Taking Up Arms”, the Constitution of the United States (in 1787), and the most desired document of all, the Declaration of Independence.

At a time when an early period printing of the Declaration in an American newspaper will sell for a half a million dollars or more, the ability to purchase a 1776 magazine with a timely printing of the full text of the document for under $4000 is a rare opportunity for any collector.

An added bonus found in many issues of Gentleman’s Magazine is that while plates and maps can simply not be found in newspapers of the 18th century, this wonderful publication contains a wealth of these engravings and wood-cut prints.

Printed separately from the regular pages of the issue and tipped within, most of the maps fold out to be double the size of the issue, and they include some of the more desired maps one would want of the 18th century, including Philadelphia, the colonies (from 1755), Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Rhode Island, the Caribbean, St. Augustine, the entire western hemisphere and so much more. Many collectors choose to frame the maps separately from the issue as they are very decorative and are typically dated in an upper corner.

Plates include the Philadelphia State House (later to be known as Independence Hall), St. Philip’s Church in Charleston, the fort at Bunker’s Hill, Ben Franklin’s ‘Square of Squares’, the guillotine which beheaded Louis XVI and his wife, a slavery medal, and even a plate of the Garden of Eden. What I have just described only scratches the surface of the treasures these magazines hold.

The “Gentleman’s Magazine” is a little gem packed with all the history one would want to find from the 18th century. Each issue typically has about 40 pages, and measuring about 5 by 8 inches, they take up very little room in a collection.

Perhaps best of all, The Gentleman’s Magazine is an accessible title as our inventory contains thousands of issues, and at prices far below what would be found in comparable American & British newspapers of the same period.

There can be little excuse for holding back on buying the best events in American history if one is willing to add this famous & successful title to their collection. And there certainly will be a time when even this title will become quite scarce as others discover it as a treasure just begging to be collected.

The June (2021) Newsletter from Rare & Early Newspapers…

June 18, 2021 by · 2 Comments 

Monthly Newsletter ~ Rare & Early Newspapers

Welcome to the June, 2021 edition of our monthly newsletter. This month we’ve added nearly 150 items to our list of discounted issues (50% off), a slew of new items to our most recently released catalog, a host of new posts to the History’s Newsstand Blog, and more. Please enjoy.
Catalog 307 – Enjoy both the remaining items from the initial release of our latest catalog of historic newspapers along with a set of newly added items:
  • Newly Added Items (updated just today) – some of the noteworthy (newly added) issues include: Captain Wirz – “The ‘demon’ jailer of Andersonville Prison”, the Gunfight at the OK Corral, the Spindletop oil discovery, multiple issues of Puck (great color covers), private letters of Daniel Webster, Brown vs. Board of Education, Blacks to have rights of citizenship in New York (1785), Adolf Hitler opens the 1936 Summer Olympics, Rabbis reject Palestine as Jewish homeland (?), William Wilberforce and the slave trade, the plan for a colonial town in America (1770), and more.
Discounted Newspapers ~ 50% off – Nearly 150 additional items have been added to our set of discounted newspapers – priced (as shown at 50% off). Although offered at a discount, the set certainly includes some gems. Some of the topics/issues include: a print of the Wright Brothers’ airplane, “the counting of slaves” in 1863, uncovering “The Holocaust”, an evening with Thomas Edison, a review of “King Kong”, the deaths of Tommy Dorsey, Knute Rockne, Jonathan Swift, Grace Moore (the Tennessee Nightingale), and Al Capone, among others.
History’s Newsstand Blog – A sampling of recent posts include:

Thanks for collecting with us.

Sincerely,

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team
RareNewspapers.com
570-326-1045

Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers . . .
           . . . History’s Newsstand
“…desiring to conduct ourselves honorably in all things.” Hebrews 13:18b

The Gentleman’s Magazine & Bankruptcy…

May 8, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

Under the illustration of St. John’s Gate that introduces each issue of the Gentleman’s Magazine, is the month and year, followed by the table of contents (each issue via the link will show an image of this – typically the last image posted).  For the first time, I noticed the calligraphy that follows “CONTAINING” and precedes the article headings and their corresponding page numbers.  “More in Quantity and greater Variety than any Book of the Kind and Price.”  While I have nothing to compare it to, I can attest that of the thirty-seven distinct articles listed for March of 1782, the subject matter ranges from Parliamentary debates to a Swiss underground road, and includes bull-baiting and the wool trade along the way.  The regular coverage of weather, news from around the world, births and marriages and deaths, trials, and literary reviews is fit in around the special bits.

In particular, my interest was caught by “Usual Causes of Bankruptcy, Caution against — ” and turned to page 138 to read.

In all ages there have been men, who, by sudden losses, by entering into indiscreet obligations, by improvident conduct, or through fraudulent designs, have become, or pretended to become, incompetent to the discharges of their just debts; but the number of bankrupts which now appear in every Gazette is a subject of serious and alarming consideration.

Along with the obvious financial harm that can be caused by frivolous living and participation in gambling, the author addresses the lack of care and foresight that must be viewed as the social responsibility of every gentleman, in order to enable him to properly discharge his debts and contribute to the public funds by means of taxes.  He recommends annual reflection for the purpose of seeing areas of weakness in funding, and to not allow debts to unknowingly pile up beyond the ability to repay.  Then, he maintains, steps toward frugality can be made in enough time to avert distress.  Finally, he offers as example the late Sir Stephen Theodore Janssen who he terms a “virtuous citizen.”  He records the words of Sir Stephen, addressed to the Livery, as he deems them of value to the general population.  The speech concludes in this way:

I do further declare that it is my determined resolution to continue living in the same frugal manner, till the last shilling is discharged; and in case any turn of fortune should happen to me, my whole just debts shall be discharged so much the sooner, as I am determined to persevere in preserving the character of an honest man.

Next Page »