Snapshot 1882… Thomas Edison lights up Manhattan…

September 21, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

Over the past two weeks we highlighted two events related to Thomas Edison. We’ll wrap things up this week with a day in 1882 when he literally Lit up the Town – or at least a portion of Manhattan, including the very building which was responsible for printing the related article shown (in part) below – The (NY) Times Building. Oddly enough, the New York Tribune also reported the event, but failed to shed light on The Times building have been in the illuminated zone. Enjoy.

The Woman’s Journal & Literary Notices… I’m Still Learning…

September 11, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

The Woman’s Journal (1872 and more), out of Boston, is the publication I am happiest to pull for any reason.  It is well-organized, with clear headings  and a clean layout.  If I have research to do, I save it for last as I am frequently inclined to ramble through the columns, and lose track of time.  With that said, it’s a splendid thing to be assigned an opportunity to focus on this paper.  Each instance of opening it brings me to a new regular feature, and this one brought me to the Literary Notices where I discovered a special treat.

In the first place, the professional tone and straightforward language convey an instant sense of intelligent discussion.  This is serious scholarship being presented.  The selections that follow only serve to deepen that impression, as listed here:

The Sphinx’s Children and Other People’sReason and Revelation Hand in HandA Study of DanteA Tale of a Lonely ParishTokologyA Book for Every WomanEvolution of To-Day

Each title precedes a 200-word thoughtful review, with summary and critique included.  The style is witty and educated, and I was wondering which of these might still be available –as they were so very interesting– when I spotted a last review occupying five times as much space as any of the others.  To my delight, it was headed as follows:

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow:  With Extracts from His Journals and Correspondence.  Edited by Samuel Longfellow

It’s a great thing to be able to read someone else’s evaluation of a work with which you are yourself familiar, most particularly if their review was written 134 years ago.  There is much to recognize and much to learn in the details of this piece.  Interestingly, I looked up the author’s name and found it to be the only one of the editorial and contributor staff to be listed by initials, rather than first name.  Further research showed that H.B. Blackwell was really “Henry Brown Blackwell” and the only male member of the staff.  The entire review closes with the “last words he [Wordsworth] ever wrote were these:

O Bells of San Blas, in vain,

Ye call back the past again;

The past is deaf to your prayer;

Out of the shadows of night

The world rolls into the light;

It is daybreak everywhere.

The very last interesting bit in this excursion of mine is an item in the adjacent Gossip and Gleanings column which reads, “Rev. Samuel Longfellow has the gratification knowing that the 4,000 copies of his brother’s life composing the first edition, are all sold.”

Announcing: Catalog #298 (for September, 2020) is now available…

September 1, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

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Catalog 298 (for September) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 300 new items, a selection which includes: a “Frederick Douglass’ Paper”, a contemporary report of the Salem witch trial, the printing of the Gettysburg Address on the front page, the Gunfight at the OK Corral, the Boston Red Sox purchase Babe Ruth, Lincoln’s first inauguration, and more.

 

The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days,

upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.

Gentleman’s Magazine & Insanity…

August 10, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

Living in a time of health concerns brought on by a previously unknown viral threat brings me a heightened awareness of the historical mysteries recorded in these ledgers from the past.  Advertisements give a clue to the extensive maladies that troubled mankind hundreds of years ago, many of which remain challenges even today.  Liver ailments, gout, yellowed eyes, rashes, sleeplessness, and obesity are just a few things for which patented tonics and trusted treatments abound.  Based on a sampling of papers such as Leslie’s Illustrated, Harper’s Weekly and any of the Wild West titles in the vast Rare & Early Newspapers collection, there is no doubt left that disease is a plague of the human condition.

Nothing, however, seems to baffle and burden society as a whole, and physicians in particular, as diseases of the mind.  And The Gentleman’s Magazine that I pulled out from October of 1808 describes the tension brought about by the ignorance in a field so relevant to our existence.

In particular, the writer addresses Mr. Urban on the unfairness of the societal and ecclesiastical condemnation of suicide, without considering the mitigating circumstances of mental illness.

In consequence of an unusual conflux of suicidal cases occurring nearly together a few months ago, the feelings of Humanity appeared to be much outraged; many calumnious and violent opinions, mingled with false censure, were inserted in our daily prints; the conduct of Juries was the subject of much unqualified condemnation; and al almost entire ignorance of the true state of the awful cases brought under their cognizance, laid the foundation of much unmerited reproach.

His pointed statement halfway through the piece provides an explanation for suicide with the following question and answer: “Why does it appear that Suicide is more general than formerly?  The answer is at hand: Insanity is an increasing disease.  A few of the bulky catalogue of human ailments have evidently decreased; unfortunately, this is not of the number.”

There’s so much more in this article that speaks to the same subject today.  While I don’t know concerning the correlation between the two, I do applaud the perspective towards those who suffer in this way.  It was a lofty goal then and is, in my humble opinion, still.

It is an absolutely demonstrable fact, that in nine cases out of twelve of self-destruction which our daily papers record, the previous situation of the subject is known, and the fatal crisis might be prevented were this knowledge acted upon with firmness, promptitude, and that just method which honour, humanity, and justice demand.

Announcing: Catalog #297 (for August, 2020) is now available…

August 3, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

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Catalog 297 (for August) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 300 new items, a selection which includes: a ‘Virginia Gazette’ from 1775, a ‘Tombstone Epitaph’ just before the gunfight, the “First Flight” of the Wright brothers, the very beginning of the Impressionist movement, a rare ‘Oxford Gazette’ (1665), a nice report: “Did Cook or Peary discover the North Pole?”, and more.

 

The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days,

upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.

The Woman’s Tribune & Frederick Douglass…

July 27, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

Many people who have faced difficult challenges in their personal lives become, in turn, sensitive to the struggles of others.  It might be a similar difficulty, but it isn’t always.  In the history of discrimination, a less-than-equal status has been designated to individuals or groups for reasons of socioeconomic status, color of skin, or gender.  Specific publications sprang up to give a voice to the unrepresented, and, at the very least, the power of the pen documented the demand to be heard.  Within the newspapers of early America are the abolitionist papers and the working men’s papers and the women’s papers.  The writers and editors called for equal status under the law, the right to own property (starting with the freedom of an individual over his or her own life) and the right to vote.

It’s this last one that has me looking intently at the front page of The Woman’s Tribune from March 2, 1895.  In the first place, I noticed that the paper is much better quality than, say, the New York Times from this era.  It seems the publishing board of this newspaper did not make the downgrade from rag paper.  But mostly I noticed that the masthead “EQUALITY BEFORE THE LAW” is followed by the column heading “Frederick Douglass“.  There is a poem written by Mary Lowe Dicks in honor of the great abolitionist, followed by a tribute/obituary that fills two columns delineating his impact for the cause of freedom.  The ending portion is particularly poignant:

In him the hopes of his race were realized; in him humanity was dignified.  The world is poorer because he is gone; humanity is richer because he came.  The legacy of his life and service attests the truth that God keepeth watch above His own, that He shall turn and overturn until injustice dies and the right eternally triumphs.

I like this honoring of another who had a different set of obstacles to overcome, but was admired for the battle he fought and the way he waged it.  I picture the huddled masses of abolitionists, suffragists, laborers — not pitted against one another, but rooting for the common goal of “liberty and justice for all.”

They Put It In Print (1862)… Slavery At The Capital…

July 10, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

We all have a tendency to view things through a lens of our own creation – and the internet and social media – both which customize our “news” to our liking, only help refine our “news” into that which reinforces our worldview. In the end, honest, open dialogue – once the fabric of our public discourse, is reduced to mere noise falling upon deadened ears. Truth is, all Republicans… all Democrats… all Libertarians… all those who disagree with our point of view are not uneducated, haters, bigots and/or evil. Republicans do not “own” patriotism, and Democrats do not possess the mantle of black-American advocacy. How do we know? Back in 1862, The New York Tribune dated March 14, 1862 put it in print:

 

 

Announcing: Catalog #296 (for July, 2020) is now available…

July 3, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

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Catalog 296 (for July) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 300 new items, a selection which includes: the Declaration of Independence (1776), the Sinking of the Titanic, the Killing of John Dillinger (in a Chicago newspaper), the Battle of Bunker Hill, the first Corvette is manufactured (report in a Detroit newspaper), an 1845 newspaper from Honolulu), and more.

 

The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days,

upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.

Announcing: Catalog #295 (for June, 2020) is now available…

May 29, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

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Catalog 295 (for June) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 300 new items, a selection which includes: Lincoln’s assassination in the New York Times, the Vicksburg Daily Citizen (printed on wallpaper), Babe Ruth is sold to the Yankees (in a Boston newspaper), Lindbergh flies the Atlantic, a graphic issue on McKinley’s assassination., a great issue on the Chicago Fire (in a Chicago newspaper)”, and more.

 

The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days,

upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.

Announcing: Catalog #294 (for May, 2020) is now available…

May 1, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

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Catalog 294 (for May) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 300 new items, a selection which includes: a great issue on the birth of the Texas oil industry, a 1775 issue from Williamsburg (Virginia), the beginning of the Impressionist movement in France, a Chicago “Extra” on the Chicago Fire, a rare “Pennsylvania Magazine” from 1775, “War Declared” in a Honolulu newspaper, and more.

 

The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

Note: after approximately 30 days the links above will redirect to the latest catalog.

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