Israeli Statehood – You can learn something new every day…

July 9, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Which major power was the first to recognize the Statehood of Israel? Perhaps it was my arrogance, naivety, or a blend of both which led me to believe the United States would hold this position, but the err in my thinking was brought to light as I read a front page article in The Raleigh Times (May 18, 1948), which revealed that although the U.S. was the first to do so vocally, the first country to formally recognize Israeli Statehood was Russia. As a matter of fact, Venezuela, Romania, France, and a host of other countries formalized their recognition before the United States, who didn’t do so formally until the end of January – nearly 9 months later. If this were the Olympics, the United States, holding the 20th position, would be in the stands watching Russia, the Czech Republic, and Nicaragua receive their medals on the victor’s stand.

The Traveler… early Sodoku?…

July 2, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Today’s journey took me to London, England, by the means of The Gentleman’s Magazine of July, 1768. I found an interesting plate entitled “A Magic Square of Squares” with an accompanying article “Surprising Properties of Numbers placed in Dr. Franklin’s Magic Square of Squares”. This is an interesting puzzle by Benjamin Franklin. “The great square is divided into 256 small squares, in which all the numbers from 1 to 256 are placed in 16 columns, which may be taken either horizontally or vertically. The properties are as follows: 1. The sum of the 16 numbers in each column vertical or horizontal, is 2056. 2. Every half column, vertical and horizontal, makes 1028, or half 2056. 3 Half a diagonal ascending, added to half a diagonal descending, makes 2056; taking these half diagonals from the ends of any side of the square to the middle thereof, and so reckoning them either upward or downward; or sidewise from left to right hand, or from right to left…”

The information continues with this sounding like a very early Sodoku puzzle!

~The Traveler

Who’s Who in Newspapers? Daniel Sickles edition…

April 26, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

The 5th installment of Who’s Who in Newspapers:

George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton… Babe Ruth, Jesse Owens, Vince Lombardi… John Wayne, James Dean, Katharine Hepburn – these individuals, among many, are easily recognizable. However, there are quite a few historical figures who, while having adorned the pages of many a newspaper, are far from household names. Such is the case with Daniel Sickles. Who is he? What was he known for? When did he live?

Feel free to peruse the following chronological list of newspapers to discover why he received so much coverage in the newspapers of his day:

DANIEL SICKLES

The Traveler… digging into his job…

April 5, 2018 by · 1 Comment 

Earlier this week I journeyed to London, England, by the way of The Post Boy dated April 1, 1718. I found the reporting of a recent court, called Assize, where the grave-digger got a bit too involved in his work. “On Saturday Night the Assizes ended at Kingston, where 15 Persons received Sentence of Death, among whom are Joseph Oade and Thomas Nightingal. The Grave-Digger of S. Saviours, who was convicted of stealing dead Bodies out of their Graves, was fined 40 s. and two Years Imprisonment…”

It made me ponder. What he did do with the bodies? And what did the others do to deserve the sentence of death and he to be only fined and imprisoned?

~The Traveler

Who’s Who in Newspapers? Joseph A. Turner edition…

February 23, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

The 4th installment of Who’s Who in Newspapers:

George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton… Babe Ruth, Jesse Owens, Vince Lombardi… John Wayne, James Dean, Katharine Hepburn – these individuals, among many, are easily recognizable. However, there are quite a few historical figures who, while having adorned the pages of many a newspaper, are far from household names. Such is the case with Joseph A Turner. Who is he? What was he known for? When did he live?

Mr. Turner just happens to be the publisher of what is believed to be the only Confederate newspaper printed/published on a Southern Plantation: The Countryman. He was the owner of Turnwold Plantation, located about 9 miles from Eatonton, Georgia – of Chick-fil-A, J.C.H. (see below), and The Color Purple fame.

As if this distinction were not enough, he took on Joel Chandler Harris – the eventual famed author of the Uncle Remus, Br’er Rabbit, and Br’er Fox stories, as an apprentice at the age of 14 – and trained him to serve as the typesetter for the newspaper.

Whenever we post an installment of “Who’s Who in Newspapers,” we typically provide a link to a chronological listing of newspapers which have information regarding the notable person in question. In this case, however, the newspapers are extremely rare, and while we do (at the time of this post) have a handful of issues, in this instance our link simply goes to a sample issue of this title:

THE COUNTRYMAN, by Joseph A. Turner

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Christmas Day… Not what one might expect…

December 24, 2017 by · 1 Comment 

Over the years we have written various Christmas-themed posts for the 25th (or 24th) of December. Many of these (and a few extras) may be viewed at Christmas-Themed Posts. However, almost by accident, as I was preparing for this year I happened to notice that the “reason for the season” and what has appeared on the pages of many newspapers published on Christmas don’t necessarily correlate. Before accessing the following link (which will take you to a chronological listing of such issues we have listed on our website – most of which are no longer available), think back through the past 300-400 years and try to come up with a handful events which were reported on Christmas morning. Once done, go to the link to see if you were successful. Enjoy – oh, and Merry Christmas.

Christmas Morning Newspapers

The Traveler… in a heart-beat…

December 21, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Earlier this month I traveled to Russell, Kansas, via the Russell Daily News dated December 4, 1967. The news making the headlines was “Heart Transplant Appears Success”.  “Doctors with crossed fingers today tended a middle-aged man given a young woman’s heart and predicted ‘pretty good’ chances of success for history’s first cardiac transplant operation. The patient’s wife called the operation a miracle…”

Unfortunately due to the medication that was used to suppress his body to keep it from rejecting the heart caused him to become susceptible to illness and he died from double pneumonia eighteen days later with the heart functioning normally.

~The Traveler

“Believe It Or Not” – 1866 edition…

October 30, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

While browsing a set of rare Daily Wisconsin Union’s from 1866, I came across an interesting set of articles within the December 29, 1866 issue which seemed appropriate for Halloween – although I’m sure Charles Dickens would beg to differ. Please enjoy the following stories involving ghosts and dreams:

Feel free to also peruse our Halloween-themed blogs and listings.

An absolutely bizarre death report from 1911…

September 21, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Mark Twain is credited with posing: ““Truth is stranger than fiction, but it is because Fiction is obliged to stick to possibilities; Truth isn’t.” If a report our staff discovered on the back page of a Fitchburg Sentinel for October 28, 1911 is any indication… score one for Mr. Twain. View the photo below to see if you agree.

The Traveler… inhumanity at its worst…

August 21, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Today’s travels took me to Gloucester, England by the way of The Glocester Journal dated August 17, 1767. I found a very horrific report on the barbaric treatments that Elizabeth blog-8-21-2017-barbaricBrownrigg did to the girl apprentices. She had beaten the one girl so viciously that, even though she had been found, the doctors were not able to save her life.  “On Sunday morning one of the unfortunate girls who were cruelly beaten, and otherwise most barbarously treated by the their mistress… of the wounds she received from there said inhuman mistress… when it appeared by the evidence of the of the surviving girl, that, about a year and a half ago, the deceased was put apprentice, and was upon trial about a month, during which she eat and drank as the family did; that soon after her mistress, Elizabeth Brownrigg, began to beat and ill-treat the deceased, sometimes with a walking-cane, at other times with a horsewhip or a postillion’s whip… and beat her with a whalebone riding-whip on several parts of her body, and with the butt-end, divers times about the head, the blood gushing from her head and other parts of her body;…” A neighbor hearing noises from the lower area of the house had her journeyman investigate it and that is how she was found.

~The Traveler

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