December thru time (50, 100, 150, 200, & 250 years ago) – 2018 edition…

December 6, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

What news was reported in the month of December – 50 (1958), 100 (1918), 150 (1868), 200 (1818), and 250 (1768) years ago? Such a walk back through time via the eyes of those who read the daily and weekly newspapers of the period can be quite revealing. This is why we often say, “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.” The following links will take you back in time to show the available newspapers from the Rare & Early newspapers website. There’s no need to buy a thing. Simply enjoy the stroll.

December:
1968 – 50 years ago
1918 – 100 years ago
1868 – 150 years ago
1818 – 200 years ago
1768 – 250 years ago
Wanting for more? Why not take a year-long gander at 1668, 1718, 1768, 1818, 1868, 1918, and/or 1968?

Israeli Statehood – You can learn something new every day…

July 9, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Which major power was the first to recognize the Statehood of Israel? Perhaps it was my arrogance, naivety, or a blend of both which led me to believe the United States would hold this position, but the err in my thinking was brought to light as I read a front page article in The Raleigh Times (May 18, 1948), which revealed that although the U.S. was the first to do so vocally, the first country to formally recognize Israeli Statehood was Russia. As a matter of fact, Venezuela, Romania, France, and a host of other countries formalized their recognition before the United States, who didn’t do so formally until the end of January – nearly 9 months later. If this were the Olympics, the United States, holding the 20th position, would be in the stands watching Russia, the Czech Republic, and Nicaragua receive their medals on the victor’s stand.

Rare Judaica Collectibles Spanning Three Centuries – 1600’s, 1700’s, & 1800’s…

June 27, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Although we rarely use this forum to highlight items being offered for sale – especially when posted as auction items, however all three authentic publications are rather unique and highly desirable:

1670 – The Jews Are Banished From Vienna (Austria)

1778 – A Rare Print from the inside of the Synagogue at Amsterdam showing the celebration of Rosh Hashanah – “The Sounding of the Ram’s Horn” (note: we’d love to know which synagogue is shown)

1865 – Congregation Shearith Israel, the oldest synagogue in the United States, mourns the death of Abraham Lincoln

From their ongoing quest to be accepted, to full acceptance demonstrated through their response to tragedy, with a rare, intimate, and illustrated look at one of their holy days sandwiched in-between, this set of issues certainly provides a broad-brush perspective of a people whose mark on history far surpasses their size. While the links above will expire once the auctions have ended, the links below will remain active indefinitely. Enjoy.

 

Who’s Who in Newspapers? Daniel Mendoza edition…

November 30, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

The 2nd installment of Wh0’s Who in Newspapers:

George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton… Babe Ruth, Jesse Owens, Vince Lombardi… John Wayne, James Dean, Katharine Hepburn – these individuals among many are easily recognizable. However, there are quite a few historical figures who, while having adorned the pages of many a newspaper, are far from household names. Such is the case with Daniel Mendoza. Who is he? What was he known for? When did he live? These questions and more can be garnered through the newspapers of his day. Please enjoy the second installment of:

Who’s Who in Newspapers?

Daniel Mendoza Edition

Note: As you explore this chronological set of newspapers, if duplicate issues appear for the same date, the item with the highest item # will have the most up-to-date information.

Who’s Who in Newspapers? Mordecai Manuel Noah…

November 27, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton… Babe Ruth, Jesse Owens, Vince Lombardi… John Wayne, James Dean, Katharine Hepburn – these individuals among many are easily recognizable. However, there are quite a few historical figures who, while having adorned the pages of many a newspaper, are far from household names. Such is the case with Mordecai Manuel Noah. Who is he? What was he known for? When did he live? These questions and more can be garnered through the newspapers of his day. Please enjoy the first installment of:

Who’s Who in Newspapers? Mordecai Manuel Noah Edition

Note: As you explore this chronological set of newspapers, if duplicate issues appear for the same date, the item with the highest item # will have the most up-to-date information.

It’s amazing what one often finds buried in old newspapers…

June 22, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Flowers, leaves, photos, clumps of hair, historic trinkets… The list of what might be found buried within and among the inside pages of historic newspapers continues to foster our love for the collectible. The latest discovery? As we were scanning a September 22, 1880 issue of The Boston Investigator hoping to find a mention of Thomas Edison (which turned out to be successful), we noticed an article titled: “Strange Tribe Of Jews Discovered In The Caucasus”, which turned out to be quite interesting:

Does anyone know… re: Sabbatai…

April 20, 2017 by · 2 Comments 

Whereas we have many original newspapers containing Judaica-themed content, finding issues with mentions of Sabbatai are quite rare. If you’ve never heard of Sabbatai Zevi, the infamous 17th century, self-proclaimed, long awaited Jewish Messiah who converted to Islam, he’s certainly worth exploring. We recently came across a report in an Oxford Gazette (issue #8) from 1665 which we believe may very well be his first mention in a bonafide newspaper (see below). The problem with “firsts” is that a first is only a first as long as a newly unearthed earlier first doesn’t relegate the older first to a second. 🙂

Has anyone ever viewed or heard of an earlier mention of him in a newspaper?

The impact of graphics – Golda Meir’s death…

April 13, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Over the past several years we’ve been running a series: Great Headlines Speak For Themselves. However, as true as this may be, quite often corresponding illustrations, photos, and other graphics speak volumes. In my humble opinion, such is the case with the front page of the *St. Petersburg Times dated December 9, 1978 (see below). I’m not a graphic designer by an means, but I couldn’t help but be impacted by the emotion portrayed by Jack Barrett’s illustration. If I were in charge of handing out awards…*Considering her place of birth (Russia), I also appreciate the irony that this great item appears in the St. Petersburg Times (albeit St. Petersburg, Florida).

The Traveler… Rabbi Gershom Seixas… 1st native-born American rabbi…

July 4, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Today I traveled back to New York City by the means of the New York Evening Post dated July 2, 1816. Under the “Died” column is “Departed this life, at 9 o’clock this morning, the Rev. Mr. GERSHOM SEIXAS, the venerable Pastor of the Hebrew congregation, in the 71st year of his age…”.

Blog-7-4-2016-Gershom-SeixasMr. Seixas was the first Native-born American rabbi. He also delivered the first Thanksgiving address in an American synagogue after the adoption of the United States Constitution. He was one of the fourteen ministers to participate in George Washington’s first inauguration.

At the merger of the 200th anniversary of his death and the 240th anniversary of the American Declaration of Independence it is fitting to consider how quickly the Jewish population became acclimated and accepted in the United States. While not without considerable bumps in the road, George Washington’s outspoken support for Jewish citizens was certainly a good beginning.

Question: Washington’s letter to the Hebrew Congregation in Newport, RI received a response from Rabbi Moses Seixas. If anyone can confirm whether or not Moses and Gershom were related, please contact Guy at guy@rarenewspapers.com.

~The Traveler

The Traveler… getting benched…

June 6, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Blog-6-6-2016-BrandeisToday I traveled to New York City by the way of The New York Times dated June 6, 1916. I found that history took place in Washington, D.C. “Every available seat in the courtroom of the United States Supreme Court was occupied at noon today when Louis D. Brandeis of Boston took his seat on the bench as an Associate Justice of that august tribunal… Chief Justice White, rising announced the appointment of Mr. Brandeis,… then announce the readiness of Mr. Brandeis to take the judicial oath, which was administered,… Justice Brandeis was then escorted by Frank Key Green, the Marshal of the court, to his seat on the extreme left of the bench. Members of the court bowed as he passed…. Mr. Brandeis took his seat…”.

Mr. Brandeis was the first Jewish Supreme Court Justice, which was bitterly contested as he “…was a militant crusader for social justice whoever his opponent might be. He was dangerous not only because of his brilliance, his arithmetic, his courage. He was dangerous because he was incorruptible . . . [and] the fears of the Establishment were greater because Brandeis was the first Jew to be named to the Court.” He was eventually confirmed by the Senate by a vote of 47 to 22 in 1916, to become one of the most famous and influential figures ever to serve on the high court. His opinions were, according to legal scholars, some of the “greatest defenses” of freedom of speech and the right to privacy ever written by a member of the Supreme Court…” per wikipedia.

~The Traveler

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