It’s amazing what one often finds buried in old newspapers…

June 22, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 
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Flowers, leaves, photos, clumps of hair, historic trinkets… The list of what might be found buried within and among the inside pages of historic newspapers continues to foster our love for the collectible. The latest discovery? As we were scanning a September 22, 1880 issue of The Boston Investigator hoping to find a mention of Thomas Edison (which turned out to be successful), we noticed an article titled: “Strange Tribe Of Jews Discovered In The Caucasus”, which turned out to be quite interesting:

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The Traveler… boxed himself into a corner…

June 19, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 
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blog-6-19-2017-cassius-clayToday I traveled to New York City by the way of The New York Times dated June 21, 1967. I found on the front page “Clay Guilty in Draft Case; Gets Five Years in Prison” “U. S. Judge Also Fines the Boxer $10,000 for Refusing Induction”.  “A Federal District Court jury tonight convicted Cassius Clay [Muhammad Ali], deposed heavyweight champion, of violating the United States Selective Service Code by refusing to be drafted into the armed services. The offense is a felony… sentenced to five years in prison and fined him $10,000… draft boards had had ample reason to deny Clay an exemption from military service on his contention that he was a minister for the Black Muslims… The 25-year-old boxer offered almost no defense against the Government’s charge and did not take the witness stand himself…”

~The Traveler

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The June (2017) Newsletter from Rare & Early Newspapers…

June 17, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 
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Each month the staff of Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers sends out a newsletter to our members which includes special offers, discounts, alerts to new inventory, and information related to the rare newspaper collectible. Our most recent newsletter may be viewed at:

JUNE (2017) NEWSLETTER – RARE & EARLY NEWSPAPERS

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A June, 2017 stroll back thru time – 50, 100, 150, 200, & 250 years ago…

June 12, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 
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What news was reported in the month of June, exactly 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 years ago (1967, 1917, 1867, 1817, 1767)? Such a walk back through time via the eyes of those who read the daily and weekly newspapers of the period can be quite revealing. This is why we often say, “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.” The following links will take you back in time to show the available newspapers from the Rare & Early newspapers website. There’s no need to buy a thing. Simply enjoy the stroll.
June:
1967 – 50 years ago
1917 – 100 years ago
1867 – 150 years ago
1817 – 200 years ago
1767 – 250 years ago
Wanting for more? Why not take a year-long gander at 1667, 1717, 1767, 1817, 1867, 1917, and/or 1967?

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Death of Button Gwinnett: rare find in an American newspaper…

June 8, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 
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The name “Button Gwinnett” is one most have never heard, yet his signature remains perhaps the most rare and valuable of all Declaration of Independence signers.

Why? He was a relatively obscure figure prior to the war, and he died less than a year after signing the Declaration. Those who like to assemble a complete set of signatures of the 56 signers of the Declaration of Independence need his signature, and only ten are known to exist in private hands.

The reason for his early death after the 4th of July is a duel. He had disagreements with a rival military commander, Lachlan McIntosh, concerning a military defeat in Florida. Gwinnett & McIntosh blamed each other for the defeat and McIntosh publicly called Gwinnett “a scoundred and lying rascal.” Gwinnett challenged McIntosh to a duel which was fought on May 16, 1777. They exchanged pistol shots at 12 paces, both wounded, with Gwinnett dying of his wounds  3 days later.

The July 24, 1777 issue of the “Continental Journal” newspaper from Boston provides a very rare report of Gwinnett’s death by duel. This is the first we have encountered in an American newspaper.

Great to find an obscure report about an equally obscure but notable name from the Revolutionary War era.

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The Traveler… they’ve got your number…

June 5, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 
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blog-6-5-2016-wwi-draftI journeyed today to New York City by means of the New York Tribune dated June 5, 1917. There I found the bold headline announce “10,000,000 Men Will Register To-day for Army of 625,000”.  “The nation’s roll of honor of 10,000,000 names will be compiled to-day. Every man between the ages of 21 and 31, whether eligible for military service ore exempt, in each of the forty-eight states of the Union, is required by the selective draft law to go to the regular polling place in his election district and register his name, date of birth and such other information as authorities require…”. This was the beginning of the draft for World War I.

~The Traveler

 

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Announcing: Catalog #259 (for June, 2017) is now available…

June 1, 2017 by · 2 Comments 
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Rare Newspapers’ monthly offering of collectible newspapers, Catalog 259, is now available. This latest collection of authentic newspapers is comprised of nearly 350 new items. Some of the noteworthy content includes:

• Anti-slavery periodical by Frederick Douglass
• Treaty of peace ending the Revolutionary War
• Perhaps the best issue on the end of the Civil War
• Historic printing of the Star Spangled Banner
• Graphic issue on the Lincoln assassination
• Perhaps the finest baseball print in a periodical

To view the above key issues and a whole lot more, go to: Catalog 259

(The catalog links shown above will redirect to the latest catalog in approximately 30 days.)

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Glorious or sad/bad timing? The death of William Wilberforce… Slavery abolished…

May 25, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 
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The Gentleman’s Magazine of September, 1773 has a 3+ page obituary of the famed British abolitionist, William Wilberforce. If you are not familiar with this early 18th century member of the British Parliament, you may want to settle in with family and friends and watch the acclaimed movie, Amazing Grace. However, as a primer, feel free to read the complete obituary at: William Wilberforce Death Report. Ironically, you’ll need to scroll past much on the India slave trade in order to view the obituary.

Speaking of irony… The date of his death is sandwiched between the Slavery Abolition Act of 1833’s passage in the House of Commons on July 26, 1833 and its Royal Assent a month later (on August 28th). Whereas the entire obituary can be read through the link above, as of the date of this post, it is also available as an eBay auction at: Wilberforce’s Obit (on eBay).

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“A self-worth reality check… Isaac Newton edition”

May 22, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 
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“How valuable am I?” “Am I indispensable?” “Will I be remembered when I’m gone?” Truth be told, if our value, degree of indispensability, and/or staying power in regards to remaining in the forefront of people’s minds is what determines our ultimate worth, we’re all in big trouble. This point was recently brought home when our staff discovered Isaac Newton’s burial report in a London Gazette dated March 30, 1727. As is typical, once discovered, we began to search the issues surrounding it for additional mentions of him, and quickly unearthed an article in the very next issue which hit us like a ton of bricks. By the time this follow-up issue went to print, Isaac Newton’s position and office had already been filled! No multi-week vigil. No adherence to mourning-etiquette before filling his shoes. No appreciation for his abundance of contributions to humanity through the claiming of his “space” as a memorial. No tour-bus route altered to include the very office where he likely pondered, explored, and then detailed some of the greatest thoughts of man. No! Within less than a week his position and office were filled, and life moved on. Quite sobering isn’t it. I don’t know about you, but this tandem of events reminds me of my own mortality, and the need for a worth which reaches beyond life’s veil.  Please “enjoy” both reports shown below.

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The May (2017) Newsletter from Rare & Early Newspapers…

May 18, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 
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Each month the staff of Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers sends out a newsletter to our members which includes special offers, discounts, alerts to new inventory, and information related to the rare newspaper collectible. Our most recent newsletter may be viewed at:

MAY (2017) NEWSLETTER – RARE & EARLY NEWSPAPERS

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