The Traveler… how long did it go?…

April 16, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 
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Today’s journeys toke me to Fitchburg, Massachusetts, by the way of Fitchburg Sentinel dated April 16, 1968 where I found a record-breaking sporting event. The Houston Astros and the New York Mets were playing at the Astrodome where “…things started getting pretty funny around the 17th inning. Roy Hofheinz officially sanctioned the humor of the situation five innings later… ‘After about the 17th inning everything sort of got funny’ said Staub, who batted nine times in the six-hour, six-minute contest. The game outlasted by two innings the longest night game played previously… The 24-inning game mercifully came to an end… with an error letting in the run after eight pitchers had battled valiantly to preserve the scoreless deadlock…”

This would become the longest scoreless Major League baseball game in history and still holds that record today.

~The Traveler

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The Woman’s Rights Convention, Seneca Falls, 1848…

April 12, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 
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A curiosity (defined): “that which arouses interest  especially for uncommon or exotic characteristics. Ex) An indoor toilet was once regarded as a curiosity.”

A curiosity (expressed): Under the heading of, “A CURIOSITY”, the August 15, 1848 issue of The Long Island Democrat has: “WOMAN’S RIGHTS CONVENTION – This Convention assembled in Seneca Falls (NY)… The meeting on Monday was only accessible to females, who drew up and signed a ‘Declaration of Sentiments,’ which reads as follows: – ‘When in the course of human events it becomes necessary for one portion of the family of man to assume among the people of earth a position different from that which they have hitherto occupied, but one to which the laws of nature and nature’s God entitle them… We hold these truths to be self-evident–that all men and women are created equal…’.”

A curiosity (redefined): That which, if pursued with vigor, principle, and considerable sacrifice, has the power to change the world!

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April thru time (50, 100, 150, 200, & 250 years ago) – 2018 edition…

April 9, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 
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What news was reported in the month of April – 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 years ago (1968, 1918, 1868, 1818, 1768)? Such a walk back through time via the eyes of those who read the daily and weekly newspapers of the period can be quite revealing. This is why we often say, “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.” The following links will take you back in time to show the available newspapers from the Rare & Early newspapers website. There’s no need to buy a thing. Simply enjoy the stroll.
April:
1968 – 50 years ago
1918 – 100 years ago
1868 – 150 years ago
1818 – 200 years ago
1768 – 250 years ago
Wanting for more? Why not take a year-long gander at 1668, 1718, 1768, 1818, 1868, 1918, and/or 1968?

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Snapshot 1969… Teddy Kennedy in hot water…

April 7, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 
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The following snapshot comes from the July 26, 1969 issue of the Springfield Republican, Springfield, Massachusetts…

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The Traveler… digging into his job…

April 5, 2018 by · 1 Comment 
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Earlier this week I journeyed to London, England, by the way of The Post Boy dated April 1, 1718. I found the reporting of a recent court, called Assize, where the grave-digger got a bit too involved in his work. “On Saturday Night the Assizes ended at Kingston, where 15 Persons received Sentence of Death, among whom are Joseph Oade and Thomas Nightingal. The Grave-Digger of S. Saviours, who was convicted of stealing dead Bodies out of their Graves, was fined 40 s. and two Years Imprisonment…”

It made me ponder. What he did do with the bodies? And what did the others do to deserve the sentence of death and he to be only fined and imprisoned?

~The Traveler

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Snapshot 1969… Teddy Kennedy (was) in cold water…

April 4, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 
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The following snapshot comes from the July 20, 1969 issue of the Springfield Republican, Springfield, Massachusetts…

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Announcing: Catalog #269 (for April, 2018) is now available…

April 2, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 
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http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpgRare Newspapers’ monthly offering of collectible newspapers, Catalog 269, is now available. This latest collection of authentic newspapers is comprised of nearly 350 new items. Some of the noteworthy content includes: a great stock market crash newspaper, the famous “Dewey Defeats Truman” newspaper, the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown, Wyatt Earp in a Tombstone newspaper, consideration of a compromise to full independence, a newspaper printed onboard a transcontinental railroad train, and more.

To view the above key issues and a whole lot more, go to: Catalog 269

(The catalog links shown above will redirect to the latest catalog in approximately 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

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Snapshot 1817… Slavery…

March 30, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 
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The following snapshot comes from the February 20, 1817 issue of the National Intelligencer, Washington (D.C.)…

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They put it in print… The DNC must make decision on the KKK…

March 28, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 
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It is easy to look at the deficiencies of our current political climate and forget from whence we came. It is one of the reasons why many of those from “The Greatest Generation,” who saw friends give up their lives for the cause of freedom, quickly become frustrated with those who take those freedoms lightly, and neglect to see the progress this “experiment is self-government” has made in less than 250 years.  I was reminded of this truth when I came across a June 28, 1924 issue of the Leominster Daily Enterprise which had the heading: “COMMITTEE [DNC] GRAPPLES ALL NIGHT WITH KU KLUX KLAN ISSUE.” Let’s put down our partisan-tipped weapons, reopen the lines of communication, and with a degree of civility and mutual respect, move forward in our quest to make this country a place where each and every citizen can prosper on a foundation of equality, hard-work, and freedom.

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They put it in print… Slavery is not a respecter of race, color, or creed…

March 24, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 
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Slavery, along with its multitude of abuses, has been part and parcel of society for millennia. This point was brought to the forefront as we were reading a July 10, 1671 London Gazette. It reports of letters from the Island of Corfu which talk about Turks transporting Christian slaves – with a mention that they were good workers. While a bit troubling, it also makes a request for everyone to stay clear of the vessels in order to keep the peace. Interesting.

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