They Put It In Print (1848)… “Lincoln that is, political gold, Illinois tea…”

September 25, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 
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A tremendous wag, hilarious, upright, a real gem… We recently uncovered the earliest “feature” article we’ve ever found regarding Abraham Lincoln – buried on the back page of the The Greensborough Patriot (NC) dated September 16, 1848. On the heels of gold having just been discovered in California, another golden-nugget was slowly becoming unearthed on the opposite side of the country – before the very eyes (and ears) of the nation. Although Lincoln was a relatively unknown senator from Illinois, a reporter heard him speak before The House and was impressed enough to take the time to record his observations. It appears this reporter, along with a host of others, would be drawn to the qualities which would set him apart from the pack, and would eventually propel him into the history books. How do we know? Back in 1848, they put it in print:

I can imagine, as articles such as this began to circulate, that the folks back in home in Illinois began to talk in Lincoln’s ear, and…

The first thing you know ol Abe’s politically extraordinaire,
Kinfolk said “Abe move away from there”.
Said “The Capitol” is the place you ought to be”
So they loaded him on a train and he moved to D.C.

The UNITED States would never be the same.

 

 

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Snapshot 1882… Thomas Edison lights up Manhattan…

September 21, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 
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Over the past two weeks we highlighted two events related to Thomas Edison. We’ll wrap things up this week with a day in 1882 when he literally Lit up the Town – or at least a portion of Manhattan, including the very building which was responsible for printing the related article shown (in part) below – The (NY) Times Building. Oddly enough, the New York Tribune also reported the event, but failed to shed light on The Times building have been in the illuminated zone. Enjoy.

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The September (2020) Newsletter from Rare & Early Newspapers…

September 18, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 
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Monthly Newsletter ~ Rare & Early Newspapers

Welcome to the September 2020 edition of our monthly newsletter. This month we’d like to bring your attention to the following:

An Expanded Set of Discounted Newspapers – 50% Off

Nearly 200 historic newspapers have been discounted by 50%. The prices shown reflect the discount. Some of the new topics include: Jesse Owens at the Berlin Olympics, the 1892 Homestead Steel Strike, a record for Wilt Chamberlain, President Nixon’s historic visit to China, the Pentagon Papers, the deaths of Karl Benz, Joseph Stalin, Al Jolson, Margaret Mitchell, “Needles” wins the Kentucky Derby, Albert Einstein celebrated, and more.

New Items Added to September’s Catalog

Since Catalog 298 went to print we’ve added over 50 additional items. Some of the topics/issues include: an extremely rare issue of the Black Hills Herald (Dakota Territory), the mention of Ben Franklin in a Philadelphia newspaper from during the Rev. War, an issue which only existed for two dates, the first candidate of the Republican Party, the financial panics of 1873 and 1907, the fist black female senator appointed, the first appearances of a couple of Walt Whitman’s poems, and more.

Catalog 298

Speaking of the catalog, some links which you may find useful include:
Key Issues from Catalog 298
Catalog 298 (in “Quick Scan” format)
Catalog 298 – Priced under $50

History’s Newsstand

A sampling of some of the recent posts on the History’s Newsstand blog include:
Thomas Edison defends his light bulb in 1879…
Celebrating Edison and his electric lamp just moments prior to the Stock Market Crash of 1929…
A series of posts from a previous staff member…
More than what meets the eye – “hidden” categories on our website…

Newly Discovered Items

Items which have been listed on our website within the last 30 days.

Thanks for collecting with us.

Sincerely,

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team
RareNewspapers.com
570-326-1045

Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers . . .
           . . . History’s Newsstand
“…desiring to conduct ourselves honorably in all things.” Hebrews 13:18b
See what’s happening on our social sites

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Snapshot 1929… Just prior to the “crash” – Thomas Edison’s electric lamp…

September 14, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 
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When one thinks of late October, 1929, it’s hard not to focus on The Great Stock Market Crash of 1929. However, even just a few days prior to the world-altering event, people were going about their lives enjoying news of a huge new airport in Chicago which at the time featured the largest hanger in the world and celebrating the 50th anniversary of Thomas Edison’s electric light bulb. In regards to the pre-crash celebration of Edison, the October 21, 1929 issue of the Chicago Daily Tribune printed a set of related cartoons on the front page, one of which is related to this joyous event. I also (accidentally?) included the 3rd due to its timeliness. Enjoy.

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The Woman’s Journal & Literary Notices… I’m Still Learning…

September 11, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 
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The Woman’s Journal (1872 and more), out of Boston, is the publication I am happiest to pull for any reason.  It is well-organized, with clear headings  and a clean layout.  If I have research to do, I save it for last as I am frequently inclined to ramble through the columns, and lose track of time.  With that said, it’s a splendid thing to be assigned an opportunity to focus on this paper.  Each instance of opening it brings me to a new regular feature, and this one brought me to the Literary Notices where I discovered a special treat.

In the first place, the professional tone and straightforward language convey an instant sense of intelligent discussion.  This is serious scholarship being presented.  The selections that follow only serve to deepen that impression, as listed here:

The Sphinx’s Children and Other People’sReason and Revelation Hand in HandA Study of DanteA Tale of a Lonely ParishTokologyA Book for Every WomanEvolution of To-Day

Each title precedes a 200-word thoughtful review, with summary and critique included.  The style is witty and educated, and I was wondering which of these might still be available –as they were so very interesting– when I spotted a last review occupying five times as much space as any of the others.  To my delight, it was headed as follows:

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow:  With Extracts from His Journals and Correspondence.  Edited by Samuel Longfellow

It’s a great thing to be able to read someone else’s evaluation of a work with which you are yourself familiar, most particularly if their review was written 134 years ago.  There is much to recognize and much to learn in the details of this piece.  Interestingly, I looked up the author’s name and found it to be the only one of the editorial and contributor staff to be listed by initials, rather than first name.  Further research showed that H.B. Blackwell was really “Henry Brown Blackwell” and the only male member of the staff.  The entire review closes with the “last words he [Wordsworth] ever wrote were these:

O Bells of San Blas, in vain,

Ye call back the past again;

The past is deaf to your prayer;

Out of the shadows of night

The world rolls into the light;

It is daybreak everywhere.

The very last interesting bit in this excursion of mine is an item in the adjacent Gossip and Gleanings column which reads, “Rev. Samuel Longfellow has the gratification knowing that the 4,000 copies of his brother’s life composing the first edition, are all sold.”

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Snapshot 1879… Thomas Edison – in defense of his electric light bulb…

September 7, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 
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The benefits of the light bulb are so interwoven throughout our lives, few would argue we take them for granted – until we notice their infamous ultra-luminescence just moments prior to our world becoming dark. However, back in 1879, Edison had received enough grief concerning his invention he would often feel compelled to provide a defense – some of which appeared in newspapers throughout the country. Such was the case with the December 27, 1879 issue of The Sun (New York). I appreciate the irony of a discussion regarding artificial light appearing in an issue of The Sun. Enjoy.

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Still Learning… Scientific American & Lupines…

September 4, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 
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We continue the “Still Learning” series by our former office manager, Stephanie, who relocated to another sate:

Lovers of children’s literature know the book Miss Rumphius by Barbara Cooney, the sweet tale of a little woman who brought the bloom of lupine to the coast of Maine.  It was an act that flowed from a desire to be content in her circumstances, and even make a masterpiece of her life.  Cooney’s artwork is memorable, as is the lesson she -illustrates,  so the word “lupine” caught my eye as I skimmed through a The Scientific American issue of the late 1800’s.

I have been immediately aware of the inventions featured in this publication, without taking in the additional material in these journals.  Directly following an expected “The Properties of Iron and its Resistance to Projectiles at High Velocities” came the surprising, “Character, Cultivation and Use of the Lupine.”  The full page report begins, “We continue this week our valuable extracts from the agricultural office of the Patent Office Report for 1861 by publishing in full the article on the Lupine, by Louis Schade, of Washington, D.C. –“, exciting my interest with the promise of other content in preceding issues.

This one is so well-written that I, science and math challenged as I am, followed the explanation and proposal.  It seems Mr. Schade studied the extensive use of these plants in European countries, particularly Germany and Prussia, where they served the dual purpose of providing cattle fodder as well as fertilizing the ground.  It seems the lupine creates more energy than usual in its absorption of soil minerals, and it “dissolves the the chemical constituents of minerals by the evaporation of its root, which is impossible for other plants,” which in turn enriches the soil.  Within two years the physical change can even be seen in the changed color of the land.

The point of this piece is a plea that farmers adopt this crop as an economic solution to the very real challenge of favorable soil.  Species of lupine are compared and rated/recommended, and sowing methods and seasons are meticulously described.  I appreciate a bit more how vital this publication was to the successful establishment of the strong agricultural system we have today.  And I am looking forward to a little more digging through the botanical titles, particularly those that stretch my gardening interests into the realm of the science of growing food.

Being firmly convinced that the lupine, if introduced by our farmers into this country, will be a Godsend to all those who have either light, sandy or exhausted soil, I consider it a matter of the highest importance that some trials with the same should be made, particularly on the sand lands of New Jersey, and the worn-out lands in Pennsylvania, Maryland, Kentucky and other States.

 

 

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Announcing: Catalog #298 (for September, 2020) is now available…

September 1, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 
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http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpg

Catalog 298 (for September) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 300 new items, a selection which includes: a “Frederick Douglass’ Paper”, a contemporary report of the Salem witch trial, the printing of the Gettysburg Address on the front page, the Gunfight at the OK Corral, the Boston Red Sox purchase Babe Ruth, Lincoln’s first inauguration, and more.

 

The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days,

upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.

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More than what meets the eye – categories on the RareNewspapers.com website…

August 28, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 
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As of now there are over 15,000 individual historic newspapers posted on the Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers website, with nearly 3 million more waiting in the wings. The ability to search for specific dates, words (or word phrases), eras, themes, issues within specific date ranges, etc. to find newspapers of interest using the website’s basic search and advanced search interface was discussed in a recent post. While both interfaces give the user quite a bit of control over what results are found, there are times when we all prefer things to be simplistic, and to this end, we have several icons (buttons) on the front page which point the explorer to a ten popular categories. However, there is much more available than meets the eye. Directly below “Popular Categories” and to the right is another button/icon, which when selected, provides access to an extensive list of pre-made search queries, arranged alphabetically. The images below illustrate how to access the list.

Now that you are aware this is present, feel free to go to www.RareNewspapers.com and check it out for yourself. Also, if you would like to suggest a topic you believe may be of interest to many, let me know at guy@rarenewspapers.com. I’ll be happy to consider adding it.

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Still Learning…Womankind & Celibacy v. Matrimony

August 24, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 
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As Womankind is less serious, less political, than its contemporary publications it seems the perfect thing to pick up on a sunny morning when the deepest thoughts I want to have concern the temperature of my morning cup of coffee.  In this frame of mind I turned pages until the following words caught my eye:

Nature has planted deep in the constitution of either sex an impulse toward one another.  Around this impulse, which nature simply bestows as part of her economy of self preservation, we have thrown a great deal of romantic drapery and pretty sentiment; have buried it in thickness of roses and lilies; have drowned its voice in songs and nightingales and tinkle of lutes and mandolins; have called upon the stars to witness to its loftiness…in fact, we have deified ourselves and our natural desires into some sort of impossible creation quite unfit for this mundane sphere.

Well, this unexpected phrasing led me to further examine the article, which spills into most of a fourth column on page 6 of the January 1893 issue.  The heading was even more startling, “Mrs. Frank Leslie Says Sensible Marriages Lead to Atrophy, Romantic Marriages to Murder and Suicide, Single Blessedness to Melancholy Madness.”

Collectors of newspapers will know the name “Frank Leslie“, many better than I do. As it turns out, this was indeed authored by the second wife of Frank Leslie, subsequent heir to his publishing enterprises.  She was a noted feminist and suffragist, editor and author.  According to Wikipedia, Miriam Squier received a business with $300,000 debt upon Leslie’s death, and turned it into a profitable enterprise.

Based on further commentary within the article that led me to this little discovery, I cannot imagine that Frank and Miriam knew great joy with one another.  But whatever the level of bliss, the impact that they made on the world of publishing cannot be denied.  In case you never have the opportunity to peruse this diatribe yourself, the following conclusion summarizes the whole:

Which then is better–or to put it a little more cynically, which is the lesser evil–the Scylla of matrimony or the Charybdis of single loneliness?  And if one decides for matrimony, which is the blacker gulf–that of a marriage de convenance, which we have styled a sensible marriage, or that of a marriage of romance and delusion, sure to end in bitter disillusion? I do not pretend to answer.  Like the sphinx, I only ask and wait for a reply.

 

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