An Alternative to Capital Punishment Explored in the 1700’s…

January 11, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Among several reports from America posted in The London Chronicle for January 19, 1768 is a report from Denmark which brings to light their experimentation with an alternative approach to the death sentence for the most heinous of crimes. Rather than editorializing, I’ll let the the text do the talking…

Announcing: Catalog #266 (for January, 2018) is now available…

January 4, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpgRare Newspapers’ monthly offering of collectible newspapers, Catalog 266, is now available. This latest collection of authentic newspapers is comprised of nearly 350 new items. Some of the noteworthy content includes:

the Battle of Bunker Hill
a rare issue of the “Pennsylvania Magazine” from 1775
the Gettysburg Address on the front page
the first magazine printing of the Star Spangled Banner
a North Carolina issue on the North Carolina secession
the Great Fire of London in a London newspaper (front page)

To view the above key issues and a whole lot more, go to: Catalog 266

(The catalog links shown above will redirect to the latest catalog in approximately 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

Sometimes it’s what’s missing that catches the eye… Alaska…

December 28, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

One of the greatest hobby-related pleasures experienced by those who collect rare and early newspapers is finding previously unidentified content within an issue. While not on the same scale as finding gold, “mining” a newspaper for reports that were missed by the seller is certainly rewarding. Time and time again collectors tell us they purchased a newspaper for under $30 for a relatively minor report only to find a hidden gem buried deeper within the issue. Such discoveries, at times, can be financially rewarding, but in a world where the unexpected is often tethered to bad news, such relatively common incidents in the newspaper collecting hobby are a sweet salve to the weary soul (okay – perhaps a little overstated). Still, it certainly is to a seller’s advantage to keep such incidents to a minimum. Prior to offering a newspaper for sale, we compare it to various historical databases and our 40+ year chronological record of findings to help us estimate when a report of historical significance might be found. Since news traveled a bit more slowly in previous centuries, even our best intentions are left wanting.

This being said, there are times when, as we go through the process of searching for historical content, what surprises us most is what we are unable to find – or the minimal coverage which is present. Its not that we miss the coverage, rather, its that what we now see as noteworthy events – often buoyed up by movies, history books, etc., were mere blips on the screen at the time they occurred, and the contemporary coverage only serves to confirm its position in the coverage food-chain of the day.

The purchase of Alaska from Russia, finalized on March 30, 1867, is such an event. After spending over an hour searching for a mention in a set of Springfield (MA) Republicans from 1867, coverage finally showed up on page five of the April 10th issue (see image). Perhaps this is why the purchase, promoted heavily by and signed by the U.S. Secretary of State at the time, William H. Seward, became known as “Seward’s Folly.” Of course just because many of his contemporaries thought paying 2 cents an acre was foolish doesn’t mean he was wrong. Sometimes the masses simply don’t get it right – as time would reveal.

 

 

Christmas Day… Not what one might expect…

December 24, 2017 by · 1 Comment 

Over the years we have written various Christmas-themed posts for the 25th (or 24th) of December. Many of these (and a few extras) may be viewed at Christmas-Themed Posts. However, almost by accident, as I was preparing for this year I happened to notice that the “reason for the season” and what has appeared on the pages of many newspapers published on Christmas don’t necessarily correlate. Before accessing the following link (which will take you to a chronological listing of such issues we have listed on our website – most of which are no longer available), think back through the past 300-400 years and try to come up with a handful events which were reported on Christmas morning. Once done, go to the link to see if you were successful. Enjoy – oh, and Merry Christmas.

Christmas Morning Newspapers

The Traveler… dry as a bone…

December 18, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Today I went to Atlanta, Georgia, by the way of The Atlanta Constitution dated December 18, 1917. I found a big announcement had just been made “‘Bone Day’ Nation Put Up To States” as the
“Prohi Amendment Adopted By House By Vote 282 to 128” had occurred.  “Nation-wide prohibition won in the house today and only the adjustment of a slight difference in resolution between the house and senate now stands in the way of submitting to state legislatures an amendment to the federal constitution forbidding the manufacture, sale or importation of intoxicating liquors for beverage purposes in the United States or its territories…”

Here’s to you!

~The Traveler

Headlines of History… The St. Louis Mercantile Library…

November 13, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

If you are in the St. Louis area in the near future, you may want to stop by the St. Louis Mercantile Library to view their new exhibit: “Headlines of History: Historic Newspapers of St. Louis and the World Through the Centuries at the St. Louis Mercantile Library Association.” A few related links are as follows:

Library An exhibit on the history of newspapers is now on display at the St. Louis Mercantile Library at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Coverage via Facebook

Posted Interview Regarding the Exhibit

Announcing: Catalog #264 (for November, 2017) is now available…

November 2, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpgRare Newspapers’ monthly offering of collectible newspapers, Catalog 264, is now available. This latest collection of authentic newspapers is comprised of nearly 350 new items. Some of the noteworthy content includes:

• Death of George Washington…
• A rare Oxford Gazette…
• “The Titanic is still afloat!”…
• Pennsylvania Gazette printed by Ben Franklin…
• President Lincoln is assassinated…
• Americans will not denounce their independence…

To view the above key issues and a whole lot more, go to: Catalog 264

(The catalog links shown above will redirect to the latest catalog in approximately 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

The University of Pennsylvania makes an interesting discovery…

October 12, 2017 by · 2 Comments 

As we search old newspapers for specific historic content, we often find unrelated items which catch our interest. In this particular case, as we were scanning an August 4, 1913 issue of the  Commercial Appeal (Memphis, Tennessee) looking for coverage of the Leo Frank trial/investigation (which we found), we also discovered an article out of the University of Pennsylvania which announced the finding of hieroglyphics in Nippur which they believe confirmed many of the details of the Biblical account of a Great Flood (see below).

Announcing: Catalog #263 (for October, 2017) is now available…

October 2, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpgRare Newspapers’ monthly offering of collectible newspapers, Catalog 263, is now available. This latest collection of authentic newspapers is comprised of nearly 350 new items. Some of the noteworthy content includes:

• Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address…
• The Declaration of Independence…
• 1776 “Boston Gazette” with the Paul Revere engraving…
• Terrific issue on the death of Marilyn Monroe…
• Print of the slave ship, with slaves…
• The Civil War begins…

To view the above key issues and a whole lot more, go to: Catalog 263

(The catalog links shown above will redirect to the latest catalog in approximately 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

Most historic Civil War event (revisited)…

September 28, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Continuing with our discussion on the “most historic” reports to be found in newspapers, we have been discussing the events of American history by era, the last being the post-Civil War 19th century. This post will discuss the Civil War era of 1861 – 1865.

Of the many events of the 19th century which changed the course of American history few would argue that the Civil War was the most significant. But what single event during the Civil War would rank as the most significant? If you could only have one newspaper from the Civil War in your collection, what one event would you most desire?

There are a number of events to consider:

1) The election of Abraham Lincoln. Although it happened in late 1860 and not technically from the war, this event would would set the tone of American politics which would lead to the war. What would have happened had he not been elected?

2) The beginning of the Civil War in April, 1861, for obvious reasons.

3) The Emancipation Proclamation of September, 1862, providing freedom to all slaves in all states, although more in theory than practicality.

4) The battle of Gettysburg, as the turning point of the Civil War.

5) The assassination of Lincoln: how would the country been different had he not been assassinated and served out his 2nd four year term?

Perhaps other events should be considered as the most historically significant. What are your thoughts?

My vote would be for the battle of Gettysburg. If it was a given that a war was inevitable to settle the political, cultural & economic divide between the North & South, it’s arguable that the war’s end was decided at Gettysburg. The tide had turned in favor of the North and  at that point it was just a matter of when it would end and not who would win.

What’s your thought?

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