Innocence… Flag Day 1921

June 14, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

One of the understated, yet profound beauties of the American experiment is self-government is not that everything is perfect; rather, its the built in mechanisms which enable peaceful positive change over time. At time the wheels of progress move all-too-slowly, but they move. The presence of political and social tension are not signs of weakness, but are part and parcel of how we function in a (hopefully) civil, free society. For most the flag represents not perfection – but the ideals which provide avenues for change. It is with these thoughts in mind in the face of current tensions that I was struck by the innocence of the moment captured on the front page of The Omaha Sunday Bee’s Rotogravure Section for June 12, 1921. Something about it seems pure and right. Whether you agree, or agree to disagree, perhaps a day will come when our children, or our children’s children, will pay the ultimate sacrifice to protect our right to do so. Happy Flag Day!

Anticipation enhanced by delayed gratification… King Tut…

June 11, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

A bride-to-be as her wedding day approaches… a young child the night before Christmas… a family as it heads off towards a long-awaited vacation destination (Can anyone hear, “Are we there yet?”)… a teacher during the last week of May – as the end of the year nudges closer… a groom as his wedding night draws near – there is no doubt that delayed gratification buoyed by a humongous helping of perseverance tends to make long anticipated events taste even sweeter. Such was to be the case for Howard Carter (archeologist – backed by financier George Herbert) as he entered the newly discovered tomb in late November of 1922 to find drawings related to the funeral of King Tutankhamun painted on the walls. After more than a decade of searching – failure built upon failure, could this be it? While newspapers would not report the opening of the inner tomb until February the following year, the front page of The New York Times from December 1, 1922 had the announcement of Carter’s initial find – with mention of the King Tut related drawings. One can only imagine the escalation in excitement this created – and the building of anticipation which occurred over the next few months. Unlike the opening of Al Capone’s vaults in 1986, this find would not disappoint!

Announcing: Catalog #271 (for June, 2018) is now available…

June 1, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpgRare Newspapers’ monthly offering of collectible newspapers, Catalog 271, is now available. This latest collection of authentic newspapers is comprised of nearly 350 new items. Some of the noteworthy content includes: an issue of the American Weekly Mercury (1735), a first report of George Washington’s death, Lee surrenders to Grant at Appomattox, Battle of Bennington (1778), Babe Ruth is sold to the Yankees, the Hindenburg explodes, and more.

To view the above key issues and a whole lot more, go to: Catalog 271

(The catalog links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

Memorial Day… The Blue and the Gray…

May 27, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

We recently discovered an original issue of The Atlantic Monthly for September, 1867, which contained the earliest nationally distributed printing (and maybe the first ever) of ‘The Blue and the Gray,” by Francis Miles Finch. Although Memorial Day had not been officially proclaimed (via General Order #11, May 5, 1868), the practice of placing flowers and wreaths on the tombstones if the fallen was somewhat common. What was uncommon was the act of a group of women in Columbus, Mississippi, which is best described in the preface to Finch’s poem (quoted from the New York Tribune):

“The women of Columbus, Mississippi, animated by nobler sentiments than are many of their sisters, have shown themselves impartial in their offerings made to the memory of the dead. They strewed flowers alike on the graves of the Confederate and of the National soldiers.”

In recognition of Memorial Day, please enjoy the full text of this grand expression of appreciation for those who have fallen in battle – be they blue or gray:

 

Announcing: Catalog #270 (for May, 2018) is now available…

May 2, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpgRare Newspapers’ monthly offering of collectible newspapers, Catalog 270, is now available. This latest collection of authentic newspapers is comprised of nearly 350 new items. Some of the noteworthy content includes: a rare “Royal Gazette” from New York, Washington’s inauguration & inaugural address, a handwritten newspaper from a prison camp, the Battle of Lexington & Concord, a Paul Revere engraving in a Boston newspaper, the Death of Bonnie & Clyde, and more.

To view the above key issues and a whole lot more, go to: Catalog 270

(The catalog links shown above will redirect to the latest catalog in approximately 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

Snapshot 1969… Teddy Kennedy in hot water…

April 7, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

The following snapshot comes from the July 26, 1969 issue of the Springfield Republican, Springfield, Massachusetts…

Snapshot 1969… Teddy Kennedy (was) in cold water…

April 4, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

The following snapshot comes from the July 20, 1969 issue of the Springfield Republican, Springfield, Massachusetts…

Announcing: Catalog #269 (for April, 2018) is now available…

April 2, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpgRare Newspapers’ monthly offering of collectible newspapers, Catalog 269, is now available. This latest collection of authentic newspapers is comprised of nearly 350 new items. Some of the noteworthy content includes: a great stock market crash newspaper, the famous “Dewey Defeats Truman” newspaper, the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown, Wyatt Earp in a Tombstone newspaper, consideration of a compromise to full independence, a newspaper printed onboard a transcontinental railroad train, and more.

To view the above key issues and a whole lot more, go to: Catalog 269

(The catalog links shown above will redirect to the latest catalog in approximately 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

They put it in print… The DNC must make decision on the KKK…

March 28, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

It is easy to look at the deficiencies of our current political climate and forget from whence we came. It is one of the reasons why many of those from “The Greatest Generation,” who saw friends give up their lives for the cause of freedom, quickly become frustrated with those who take those freedoms lightly, and neglect to see the progress this “experiment is self-government” has made in less than 250 years.  I was reminded of this truth when I came across a June 28, 1924 issue of the Leominster Daily Enterprise which had the heading: “COMMITTEE [DNC] GRAPPLES ALL NIGHT WITH KU KLUX KLAN ISSUE.” Let’s put down our partisan-tipped weapons, reopen the lines of communication, and with a degree of civility and mutual respect, move forward in our quest to make this country a place where each and every citizen can prosper on a foundation of equality, hard-work, and freedom.

They put it in print… Slavery is not a respecter of race, color, or creed…

March 24, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Slavery, along with its multitude of abuses, has been part and parcel of society for millennia. This point was brought to the forefront as we were reading a July 10, 1671 London Gazette. It reports of letters from the Island of Corfu which talk about Turks transporting Christian slaves – with a mention that they were good workers. While a bit troubling, it also makes a request for everyone to stay clear of the vessels in order to keep the peace. Interesting.

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