Entry point to the Rare Newspapers Collectible… 16th & 17th Centuries…

February 17, 2011 by · 2 Comments 

Our peek at the lower-end entry points into the hobby of collecting rare and early newspapers draws to a conclusion today with a gander at inexpensive newspapers published prior to 1700. A list of titles priced at under $50 includes:  The London Gazette, The Athenian Mercury, Votes of the House of Commons, The Observator, and The Weekly Pacquet of Advice From Rome, all of which are British publications.

The following link will take you to these potential pre-1700 entry-point issues: Pre-1700 Inexpensive Issues

Enjoy!

Note:  View the following to explore the History’s Newsstand Blog’s featured posts on the upper end of the collectible: “Prices Realized” and “Most Collectible Issues“.

Entry point to the Rare Newspapers Collectible… 18th Century…

February 3, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Over the past month the History’s Newsstand Blog has explored the lower-end entry points into the hobby of collecting rare and early newspapers. This next installment takes us back to the 18th century.  The further we move back in time the higher (price-wise) is the entry point.  One of the common ways to keep your early (into the hobby) 18th century collecting budget under control is to start by collecting newspapers/magazines from England.  Typically, reports on American affairs found within British publications cost as little as 1/10 (and sometimes even less percentage-wise) than the corresponding reports in American issues.  With this in mind…

The following selection provides a glimpse of the wide variety of 18th century issues available valued at $25* and under.  Many more exist on the Rare Newspapers’ website, but others can be found throughout the collectible community as well. The item numbers for each are linked to corresponding images.

The oldest newspaper in the world…

120436 THE LONDON GAZETTE, England, dates ranging from 1726 to 1730  – This is the oldest continually published newspaper in the world, having begun in 1665 and is still being published today. Reporting is almost entirely concerned with Parliamentary items and European news with some advertisements near the back of the issue.  $18.00*

From Pre-Revolutionary War England…

121059 THE ST. JAMES CHRONICLE; OR, THE BRITISH EVENING POST, London, England, 1767. Nice engraving in the masthead makes this a displayable issue. Various news of the day and a wealth of ads, from not long before the outbreak of the Revolutionary War. $18.00*

From Post-Revolutionary War England…

208968 THE GENERAL EVENING POST, London, 1792  A nice “typical” folio-size newspaper of 4 pages from the 18th century. There is a wealth of news of the day on the front page and inside pages with some ads scattered throughout as well.  $18.00*

By the town critic…

121100 THE CONNOISSEUR, London, 1755. See the photo below for an example of this title from our archives. An uncommon and early title “By Mr. Town, Critic & Censor General” as noted in the masthead. Done in editorial format.  $20.00*

From 18th century Scotland…

208447 THE EDINBURGH EVENING COURANT, Scotland, 1785.  A nice 18th century Scottish newspaper with the entire front page taken up with ads, with various news of the day on the inside pages. Some of the ads have illustrations as well. Complete in 4 pages, partial red-inked tax stamp on the front page, folio size, some light browning or dirtiness, but in generally nice condition.  $20.00*

Additional issues priced at $25* and under may be viewed at: Entry Level Newspapers

* All prices shown were valid as of the release date of this post.

View the following to explore the History’s Newsstand Blog’s featured posts on the upper end of the collectible: “Prices Realized” and “Most Collectible Issues“.

Entry point to the Rare Newspapers Collectible… 19th Century…

January 20, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

In the past the History’s Newsstand Blog has featured posts on the upper end of the collectible: “Prices Realized” and “Most Collectible Issues“.  We are now taking a look at the other end of the spectrum – (low cost) entry points into the hobby.  A few weeks ago we explored low cost issues from the 20th century.  This post moves back in time to the 19th century.

The following selection provides a glimpse of the wide variety of 19th century issues available valued at $15* and under.  Areas of interest include the War of 1812, religious-themed, youth-themed, snap-shots of 19th century city life, and more.  Many more exist on the Rare Newspapers’ website, but others can be found throughout the collectible community as well.  The item numbers for each are linked to corresponding images.

Introductory Issue from the 1800’s…

209016 An original issue from the 1800’s  to help jump start your collection.  This issue is guaranteed to be original, complete, and to be dated in the 1800’s.   We do not offer reproductions of any kind!  There is a limit of 10 issues per customer at this price.  See the images for examples of the condition and look of the issue you will receive.  The image shows several issues to give you a sense of the various titles/conditions you may receive, but please know this listing is for a single issue – at a great price. $3.00*

The War of 1812…

207496 COLUMBIAN CENTINEL, Boston, dated during the War of 1812.   The issue you will receive is similar to the issues shown in the image – slight wear, minor staining and foxing, etc..  The issue will be dated from during the War of 1812, and will have war related news and news of the day.  A great issue to own at an incredible price.  $7.00*

From France…

153338 GALIGNANI’S MESSENGER, Paris, 1837. An interesting newspaper from France but printed in English, and featuring a black-inked tax stamp on an inside page. Various news of advertisements. Four pages, nice condition. Note:  The policy/purpose of this title was to promote good feeling between England and France, and was highly regarded. $13.00*

19th century publication for youth…

152963 THE YOUTH’S LEDGER, New York, NY, 1887. “An interesting monthly for the Young” as is printed in the masthead. See the photo for an example of the “look” of this title from our archives. This is a nice issue to have from this location and period in history. Six pages approximately 16″x11″. $11.00*

Pittsburgh, PA… just before steel production…

153013 THE PITTSBURGH LEADER, Pittsburgh, PA, 1873. State, local and national news from this era.  Interesting to have news of the day from just before steel production hit in full force. See the photo for an example of this title from our archives. Note that the photo is “generic” and the issue you get will not have these specific photos or be of this specific date but will have the format as shown. 21″x17″. Four pages and in nice condition. $15.00*

Exploring the influence of war on domestic Life…

153036 ADVOCATE OF PEACE, (Hartford, Connecticut), 1834. An interesting magazine which has war as its theme, and the value of peace as opposed to war. Note that the photo is “generic” and the issue you get will not have this specific date but will have the format as shown. Forty-six pages, measuring 9″x6″, disbound without outer wrappers. $11.00*

Additional issues priced at $15* and under may be viewed at:  Entry Level Newspapers

* All prices shown were valid as of the release date of this post.

Entry point into the Rare Newspapers Collectible… 20th Century…

January 6, 2011 by · 2 Comments 

In the past the History’s Newsstand Blog has featured posts on the upper end of the collectible: “Prices Realized” and “Most Collectible Issues“.  To kick off the new year we thought it might be nice to look at the other end of the spectrum:  “Entry Points to the Rare Newspapers Collectible”.  Throughout this month we will target examples of the least expensive collectible newspapers available for each century.

Our journey begins with the 20th century…

The following selection provides a glimpse of the wide variety of issues available valued at $15* and under.  Areas of interest include shipping, finance, theater, historic events, and more.  Many more exist on the Rare Newspapers website, but others can be found throughout the collectible community as well.  The item numbers for each are linked to corresponding images.

A World War II newspaper from the Navy Yard…
575571 BEACON, Philadelphia Navy Yard, 1944  A military paper produced at the Navy Yard with a great wealth of war-related content and a war-related masthead as well.
Eight pages, 10 1/2 by 16 pages, printed on high quality paper, nice condition. $9.00*

From the Panama Canal Zone…
579280 THE PANAMA CANAL RECORD, Balboa Heights, Canal Zone, 1928. A little magazine subtitled: “Official Publication of the Panama Canal” with a wealth of data concerning the canal and its use. Approximately twenty-six pages measuring 9″x6″. $12.00*

World War 1…
161488 OFFICIAL BULLETIN, Washington, DC, 1918. An unusual newspaper published daily by the “Committee on Public Information”, meant to keep the public informed of both political & military matters, particularly during the WWI period. Note that the photo is “generic” and the issue you get will be of a slightly different date but will have the format as shown. Sixteen pages measuring 12″x9″. Lightly browned with some minor edge tears. $10.00*

For the little child in all of us…
161498 THE YOUTH’S COMPANION, Boston, Massachusetts, 1900. A charming newspaper with several short stories for children, featuring several wonderful illustrations, an ornate masthead, and plenty of advertisements. $10.00*

In-house real estate periodical…
161495 STROUT’S BUGGY-SEAT CONFIDENCES, Boston, Massachusetts, 1911. A curious little publication by and for those working for the Strout real estate company, the “World’s Largest Farm Agency”. Printed on coated stock.  $10.00*

Movie News! Burt Lancaster & Ava Gardner…
564394 MOTION PICTURE DAILY, from New York, dated September 28, 1956. Interesting little publication for and about the movie industry, giving the latest information on the various background events of the motion picture world. Television news as well. Too much to mention. 6 pages measuring 12″x9″, printed on coated stock paper. Nice shape. $10.00*

Additional issues priced at $15* and under may be viewed at:  Entry Level Newspapers

* All prices shown were valid as of the release date of this post.

Rare Newspapers… What to collect?

March 31, 2011 by · 1 Comment 

There are an infinite number of ways to approach collecting rare newspapers.  The History’s Newsstand Blog is pregnant with suggestions.  Over the course of the next several months we will begin to explore the topic in earnest.  For those who are new to the hobby, and are anxious to explore what has been written to-date, the following links are to help bring you up to speed:

Feel free to share your thoughts on ideas for collecting rare and early newspapers: themes, eras, topics, etc.

Why historic newspapers? Time travel… raw emotion…

April 4, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

I remember the first time I held an authentic Civil War era newspaper and was struck by the concept of holding history in my hands. As I read through the detailed battle reports, raw emotion welled up within me as I pondered the possibility of a loved one’s tears falling upon the very newspaper I was holding – as he/she discovered the name of a close relative… even a spouse listed among those killed in battle. As I continued to peruse the paper, the prevalence of ads, birth and wedding announcements, local news reports, etc. communicated a truth that hit me like a ton of bricks: Despite the carnage of war, and the tears of many who had just learned of the loss of someone they loved, life continued to move forward. Anyone who has lost a dear friend or family member knows the emotion: “Hey world – What are you doing? STOP! Don’t you know what’s just happened?” But the train of time rushes forward – ignoring our desperate cry for just a few more minutes…

At this point I took a breath – carefully closed the newspaper, and returned to the present – convinced I had discovered the greatest hobby of them all; one that enables anyone who would dare, to go where Orson Wells, Jack Finney, and others could only dream of going: back in time.

A collector recently sent a related note stating:

Like many people I’m sure, I have over the years fantasized many times about being able to go back in time. I realize now that this hobby has enabled me to get just a glimmer of that feeling inside, as I hold such old papers, reading the words and seeing the engravings and old photos. Touching the history in such a physical, tangible way evokes a feeling as close to time travel as we can probably ever come…and is a unique experience utterly lacking in the high school history textbooks I originally studied, or merely looking at images on a computer monitor these days. -Actapublicurist

Yet another, upon discovering the Bobby Kennedy Assassination Report issue shown in the image wrote (in part):

I will never sell this newspaper…  I will be 60 in November and lived in Brooklyn when Senator Kennedy was killed.  I still shed tears when I think about it all these years later.  He left nine children (and a tenth on the way) and a wonderful wife, and we will never know what a difference this magnificent man with a huge heart would have made in the White House.  I grieve for him as if he was close friend.  I will treasure this newspaper and others in my ample collection of the RFK assassination.

What an incredible hobby!

Mormon history in newspapers…

March 15, 2013 by · 3 Comments 

As is true with any historical event or founding of an institution, collectors of historical newspapers strive for the earliest reports possible. The Declaration of Independence first appeared in a newspaper on July 6, 1776, and that issue commands a six figure price much higher than printings of the document in other newspapers of later dates (such as the British Gentleman’s Magazine from August, 1776). Battle reports from the Revolutionary War are most coveted when in newspapers dated as close to the battle as possible. With the widespread use of the telegraph just before the Civil War, timeliness became less of an issue, as events would typically be found in the next day’s edition of newspapers regardless of how distance the printing press was from the event.
With institutions, societies & organizations the collector strives for the earliest reports on their creation. Reports from the Continental Congress, the Constitutional Convention, the creation of military academy at West Point, the first baseball game mention, are just a few examples of icons of present-day societies which collectors like to find in newspaper reports dated as early as possible.
Such is true with development of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, or the Mormons. Formally organized in upstate New York in 1829 accounts from that year or 1830 would rank among the most desired. Our earliest account was found in the ‘Christian Intelligencer” issue of February 4, 1831. As was typical with reporting of the day, bias, discrimination and prejudice were rampant within the newspaper pages, with the publisher’s mind-set not encumbered by political correctness. This early report notes that: “…the career of some fanatical individuals, who pretend to work miracles and to preach a new gospel. They profess to have discovered somewhere in New York a new revelation, hidden under a stone, which enables them to work miracles…a delusion and phrenzy with which these individual have wrought up the public mind…something like 500 adherents who follow those ignorant and deluded men with the same submission that sheep are led to slaughter…”. This intriguing report was likely the first its subscribers learned of this new religious movement,and with a current membership of over 14 million, this report dates to when just 500 were followers.
A slightly later report in the popular ‘Niles’ Weekly Register‘ newspaper from Baltimore, July 16, 1831, shows a similar  bias & prejudice: “…that certain knaves, pretending to have found some holy writings hidden under a stone…started a new religion! The leaders make bold pretensions and assert a gift to work miracles…now said to amount to 1,000 souls…some of whom…no doubt believe in all things that are told them…” and more.
Newspaper accounts found in the 1831-1835 period were very few and remain among the most desired among collectors.
By the time the leader Joseph Smith and the Mormons moved from Kirtland, Ohio, to Missouri and then Nauvoo, Illinois by 1839, reports in newspapers became more numerous, as their travels were often made dangerous by the suspicious locals who didn’t want them in their vicinity.
An interesting and desired collection of Mormon-related newspapers would include period reports of their movement westward, from New York to Ohio to Missouri to Illinois and ultimately to their own state of “Deseret” in the present-day state of Utah.  With their arrival in 1847, Utah was not only not a state, it was not even a territorial possession. It was part of Mexico, but with the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo which ended the Mexican War in 1848, it became a territory of the United States, and the disputes between the Mormons and the federal government would be legendary, the Mountain Meadows Massacre being among the most publicized. In additional to federal battles, disputes within their organization were quick to make the newspapers, and the practice of plural marriage did not set well with the typical Judeo-Christian ethic of the day.
Typical of religious movements of the 19th century, the Mormons published several of their own periodicals, among the earliest and occasionally available being ‘Times & Seasons’ done during their turbulent stay in Nauvoo, Illinois. Within its pages was the  report of the killing of founder and leader Joseph Smith. Other titles which occasionally surface for collectors are ‘The Latter-Day Saints’ ‘Millennial Star‘, the ‘Gospel Reflector’, and some three years after their arrival at Salt Lake City they set up the ‘Deseret News‘ in 1850, which was the first first newspaper to be published in  present-day Utah, some 46 years before it would become a state.

The fascinating and troublesome history of the Mormons and their trek across the frontier of America is now part & parcel of American history. Finding reports in newspapers from when they happened makes for an interesting segment of any rare newspaper collection.

Summing up the Revolutionary War through 1779…

January 25, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

The front page of The Edinburgh Advertiser“, July 23, 1779, has a great letter (see below) signed by “An Englishman” which pretty much sums up the Revolutionary War through the mid-point of 1779. Never before have I seen a more accurate appraisal of the situation in so few words.

Value of the internet…

May 13, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

I never fail to be amazed at the incredible wealth of information which is available on the internet, and I never fail to be thankful for such an incredible resource, particularly remembering what it took thirty years ago to research  a newspaper.

Back in the 1970’s and ’80’s, when I wrote up an issue for the catalog I had to pull out the encyclopedia if I was unsure of a specific date or consequences of a certain battle. And I also kept close at hand other resources which would document events I was finding in our inventory of newspapers.

But today, more information than I could possibly need flashes on my screen in a matter of seconds. What was the date James Buchanan died? Wikipedia tells me more quickly then it takes me to type  “james buchanan”. Many times I’ll read an interesting article about a person which sounds intriguing but is lost to my memory. The web quickly provides a wealth of detail.

What brings this to mind is an entry I worked on this morning. The Army & Navy Journal” of Dec. 3, 1864 has a touching item about a Mrs. Bixby who received a letter of condolence from Abraham Lincoln for her loss of five sons in the Civil War, the sixth was lying wounded in a hospital. The article includes the letter by Lincoln. Not having heard of this letter, as a whim I decided to Google “mrs. Bixby letter” to see if this was an “event”. To my surprise there is more to the story than the article could give, thanks to the “Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln”.

The touching letter by President Lincoln can be read in the photo. Below is the “rest of the story”:

Credit: “Collected Works of Abraham Lincoln”: In the fall of 1864, Massachusetts Governor John A. Andrew wrote to President Lincoln asking him to express condolences to Mrs. Lydia Bixby, a widow who was believed to have lost five sons during the Civil War. Lincoln’s letter to her was printed by the Boston Evening Transcript. Later it was revealed that only two of Mrs. Bixby’s five sons died in battle (Charles and Oliver). One deserted the army, one was honorably discharged, and another deserted or died a prisoner of war.

The authorship of the letter has been debated by scholars, some of whom believe it was written instead by John Hay, one of Lincoln’s White House secretaries. The original letter was destroyed by Mrs. Bixby, who was a Confederate sympathizer and disliked President Lincoln. Copies of an early forgery have been circulating for many years, causing some people to believe they have the original letter.

The point of this piece is to cite just one example how the internet opens a whole new world to the tidbits of history we find within early newspapers. A 150 year old article might pique the curiosity, but it is the internet which can satisfy. It’s a fascinating combination of very old & very new technology which fit so well in this hobby we love. Give the internet a try with some articles in your collection. You may be pleasantly surprised at what you will find.

Rick Brown & HistoryBuff.com – Featured Website!

November 17, 2008 by · 1 Comment 

Rick’s entry into the hobby took a path similar to Timothy Hughes’.  He started collecting historical newspapers in 1965 when he purchased a Philadelphia Inquirer for the capture and death of John Wilkes Booth.  As he held his new purchase in his hands, he was suddenly struck by what many since him have come to realize: “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported”. He describes this first encounter with historic newspapers himself…

“Reading the emotion-filled accounts from actual witnesses suddenly opened a new door for me. Before, my viewpoint of history was that it was just a series of dates, names and events. Reading the actual eyewitness accounts made the names and events come to life. Imagine, being able to hold something in your hands that was “alive” when the event happened — 100, 200 or even 300 years old. For the next four years I literally purchased every old newspaper I could find. By 1969 I realized that I was running out of storage room…”

By 1969 he became a mail order dealer in historic newspapers. In 1984 he started a publication for newspaper collectors, “Collectible Newspapers”, which featured journalism history articles.

Tim fondly remembers the publication and the extraordinary efforts of Rick to bring together newspaper collectors from all corners of the country–and across the globe as well.

“Rick was a true hobbyist. He expended much effort and money to provide a channel to bring together all collectors under a common banner–the Newspaper Collector Society of America (NCSA). Never was he motivated to profit by the hobby.  In more ways then he might admit, Rick did much to help the fledgling hobby grow. Rick’s a terrific guy and remains an extremely valuable resource for the hobby” says Tim.

In 1995 he discovered the internet, and by October 1995, Rick had a small website utilizing articles he had first printed in “Collectible Newspapers.” By January 1997, the site was getting 25,000 hits per month, and he could no longer justify the publishing costs for 25,000 people, so he ceased publishing the print version with the April 1997 issue.

Now, thirteen years later, HistoryBuff.com is reaching nearly 90,000 unique viewers AND 500,000+ PAGE VIEWS monthly. In October 2003, HistoryBuff.com was granted nonprofit status at both the federal and state level. While donations help keep HistoryBuff.com online, Rick fills in with money of his own. As with most nonprofits, financing is always a chore and there is seldom enough to keep it going. He has never taken pay for his work; truly a labor of love.

The HistoryBuff.com website provides a wealth of historical information beneficial to both novice and well-seasoned historians.  It describes itself as:

“…a nonprofit organization devoted to providing FREE primary source material for students, teachers, and historybuffs. This site focuses primarily on HOW news of major, and not so major, events in American history were reported in newspapers of the time. In addition, there is information about the technology used to produce newspapers over the past 400 years.”

A sampling of resources provided at HistoryBuff.com includes:

The most recent addition to the website is panoramas of historic sites in America.  Upon entering, you will be treated to a guided tour of more than a dozen well-known historic sites.

Whether your primary interest is history or the collection of “History in Your Hands” via newspapers, the resources available through these links will prove to be invaluable.   As a former educator, I particularly appreciate the access to Rick’s Interactive Quizzes.  Subscriptions to the monthly EMAILED newsletter are available at no cost.

If you have yet to browse through the pages at HistoryBuff.com, a treat awaits.  Warning:  Before visiting, make certain you’ve cleared your schedule for a few hours.  Walking through history is a trek worth savoring. Thanks Rick!

Feel free to comment on your visit (or more likely… visits) to HistoryBuff.com.