The Woman’s Journal & Literary Notices… I’m Still Learning…

September 11, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

The Woman’s Journal (1872 and more), out of Boston, is the publication I am happiest to pull for any reason.  It is well-organized, with clear headings  and a clean layout.  If I have research to do, I save it for last as I am frequently inclined to ramble through the columns, and lose track of time.  With that said, it’s a splendid thing to be assigned an opportunity to focus on this paper.  Each instance of opening it brings me to a new regular feature, and this one brought me to the Literary Notices where I discovered a special treat.

In the first place, the professional tone and straightforward language convey an instant sense of intelligent discussion.  This is serious scholarship being presented.  The selections that follow only serve to deepen that impression, as listed here:

The Sphinx’s Children and Other People’sReason and Revelation Hand in HandA Study of DanteA Tale of a Lonely ParishTokologyA Book for Every WomanEvolution of To-Day

Each title precedes a 200-word thoughtful review, with summary and critique included.  The style is witty and educated, and I was wondering which of these might still be available –as they were so very interesting– when I spotted a last review occupying five times as much space as any of the others.  To my delight, it was headed as follows:

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow:  With Extracts from His Journals and Correspondence.  Edited by Samuel Longfellow

It’s a great thing to be able to read someone else’s evaluation of a work with which you are yourself familiar, most particularly if their review was written 134 years ago.  There is much to recognize and much to learn in the details of this piece.  Interestingly, I looked up the author’s name and found it to be the only one of the editorial and contributor staff to be listed by initials, rather than first name.  Further research showed that H.B. Blackwell was really “Henry Brown Blackwell” and the only male member of the staff.  The entire review closes with the “last words he [Wordsworth] ever wrote were these:

O Bells of San Blas, in vain,

Ye call back the past again;

The past is deaf to your prayer;

Out of the shadows of night

The world rolls into the light;

It is daybreak everywhere.

The very last interesting bit in this excursion of mine is an item in the adjacent Gossip and Gleanings column which reads, “Rev. Samuel Longfellow has the gratification knowing that the 4,000 copies of his brother’s life composing the first edition, are all sold.”

Snapshot 1847… Woman’s Suffrage meets dripping sarcasm…

November 26, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

The following snapshot comes from the Boston Evening Transcript dated August, 9, 1847. Perhaps the journalist should have included a little less sarcasm in the reporting on this historic woman’s suffrage gathering.

The Traveler… suffrage is defeated… groom and bride-to-be divided…

October 19, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Blog-10-19-2015-Woman's-SuffrageToday I traveled to New York City by the way of the New York Times dated October 20, 1915. The headline is “New Jersey Beats Suffrage by 46,278; While President Wilson Votes ‘Yes,’ Mrs. Galt, his Fiancee, Is Out As Anti”. “Woman suffrage was defeated at the special election in New Jersey yesterday, when it had its first test in any Eastern State… President Wilson’s endorsement of the suffrage cause and his pledge to vote for the Constitutional amendment on which the suffragists of New Jersey had built such strong hopes did not help to carry the day for the suffragist even in the precinct where he himself cast his ballot yesterday… Mrs. Galt, the President’s fiancee, while Mr. Wilson was on his way to Princeton to vote “Yes,” let it be known in Washington that she is opposed to women voting…”.

While their opinion differed on the topic of suffrage, that did not hinder their relationship as they were married just two months later.

~The Traveler

Nellie Bly… an interview with Susan B. Anthony…

July 15, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Blog-7-15-2015-Nellie-Bly-Susan-B-AnthonyNellie Bly (Elizabeth Cochrane Seaman), the American Journalist who became famous through her writing for Pulitzer’s New York World, is best remembered for her exposé regarding the horrific conditions within mental institutions obtained by faking her own insanity – taking investigative journalism to a whole new level, and her documentation of her record-breaking 72-day trip around the world as she emulated Jules Verne’s fictional character Phileas Fogg from Around the World in 80 Days. However, few are aware of her intimate and informative interview with Susan B. Anthony, perhaps the only woman to rival her pioneering spirit, which was printed in the New York World, February 2, 1896. The article in its entirety may be viewed at:

Nellie Bly – Interview with Susan B. Anthony

The Traveler… Too Much Pain and Suffraging…

April 6, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Today I traveled to Fairmont, West Virginia, by the means of The Fairmont Times dated April 6, 1915. There I found a front page photo of Jess Willard who had just Blog-4-6-2015-Pain-and-Suffragebeaten world boxing champion Jack Johnson in the 26th round by a knock-out. This match held in Havana, Cuba, was the longest heavy-weight title fight of the 20th century. Jack Johnson was quoted “Fought hard enough to whip ten ordinary men.” There were reports that Johnson had thrown the fight, with Willard’s response being  “If he was going to throw the fight, I wish he’d done it sooner. It was hotter than hell out there.”

And if news of physical suffering was not enough…

Also on the front page is reporting of the upcoming Suffrage Convention: “Suffrage Convention Plans Complete”, which was to be in held in Fairmont.

~The Traveler

The Traveler… we’ve come a long way baby…

October 17, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

This week I traveled to The Woman’s Journal of October 14, 1911. This issue was celebrating after waiting two days for the outcome of the California election on the suffrage vote… “reading first with despair, then with growing hope and finally with jubilation the conflicting reports that came over the wires… Praise God. Victory ours. Four thousand majority.” The front page contains a photo of the Statue of Liberty with six stars surrounding her. These represented the states which have passed the “equal suffrage” — Wyoming, Colorado, Utah, Idaho, Washington and now adding California.

The 1848 Seneca Falls Convention is traditionally viewed as the beginning of the Women’s Rights Movement. It was not until June 4, 1919 that Congress sent the proposal for the 19th Amendment, the woman’s right to vote, and then it was not until August 18, 1920 that the final ratification was passed, by the vote from Tennessee. It was a long road, but “we’ve come a long way baby” since then!

~The Traveler

The Traveler… election time of the year… Standard Oil anti-trust case…

May 2, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

As I began to venture into my travels, I remembered that we are also heading into a lot of the preliminary voting times. This led me to The Woman’s Journal which, as stated underneath the title, was the “Official Organ of the National American Woman Suffrage Association” founded by Lucy Stone and Henry B. Blackwell in 1870. The issue I selected was not for today’s date, but for May 27, 1911 when they announced that they would be hold their National Suffrage Convention in October. It was not until 1920 that women received the right to vote. Fifty years of persistence paid off!!

Also within the issue is an article pertaining to the recent ruling of the Standard Oil anti-trust case which dissolved Standard Oil. An interesting statement was.. “The Standard Oil trust, nominally dissolved, will no doubt recombine in a slightly different form and continue to do business at the old stand, and will raise the price of oil enough to cover its law expenses.” Shocking, right?!?!

~The Traveler