Great Headlines Speak For Themselves… Clark Gable’s death report…

May 15, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

The best headlines need no commentary. Such is the case with the HERALD EXPRESS, Los Angeles, November 17, 1960: "CLARK GABLE DIES WITH A SMILE, SIGH"Blog-4-24-2015-Clark-Gable-Death

The Civil War (post conflict)… May, 1865

May 1, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

What news was reported in May, 1865 - 150 years ago? Such a walk back in time through the eyes of those who read the daily and weekly newspapers of the period can be Blog-5-1-2015-Jefferson-Davis-Capturedquite revealing. This is why we often say, “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported." The following link will take you back in time to show the available newspapers from the Rare & Early newspapers website. There's no need to buy a thing. Simply enjoy the walk back in time:

May, 1865

A sampling of what you will find may include articles and info regarding: President Abraham Lincoln's funeral, the capture of Jefferson Davis, the capture and killing of John Wilkes Booth, the promotion of Ulysses S. Grant, President Andrew Johnson's amnesty proclamation, and more. Enjoy!

Ford’s Theater… then and now…

April 24, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Blog-4-24-2015-1865-Ford's-Theater150 years ago, much of the nation was still reeling from the death of Abraham Lincoln. A mere 10 days previous time stood still and tears flowed freely at the news that the President had been killed. Did many travel to Washington, D.C. to mourn his passing? Did some visit the very site of his tragic and untimely demise to place a candle... flowers... mourn? The Philadelphia Enquirer, April 17, 1865, not on only printed a sketch of the captured John Wilkes Booth, but they also included a front-page schematic (right) of the back-alley escape route where a horse was waiting for the infamous villain and his accomplice. While the region has gone through several transformations over the course of the last 150 years, this same alley exists today. The current-day photo shown below was sent to us be a collector friend who also included the following note:

I have attached a picture of the rear of Ford's Theater as it looks today (showing the original windows/doorways that have been bricked-up)...and I want to point out that the alleyway shown on that April 17th issue is incredibly, to this day, the only exit on the entire block and proportioned to what it was in that newspaper.

If you've never visited Ford's Theater in Washington, D.C., it is certainly worth the trip.Blog-4-24-2015-21st-Century-Ford's-TheaterNote: During my days as a Middle School Teacher, can anyone guess the most common question students asked upon visiting this spot during a school trip?

They put it in print… Sons of Liberty…

April 13, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Finding reports in centuries-old newspapers which read like they came from today's papers are always fascinating. They provide interesting evidence that  life today, in many ways, is not necessarily so much different from years ago. A report in the October 12, 1776 issue of "The Pennsylvania Ledger" newspaper (see below) of Philadelphia contains a very interesting piece which accuses the manipulation of news, reading: "It is astonishing to see daily the insults offered by the Tories...since the news of the skirmish on Long Island; on the first report...congratulate each other...They have the effrontery to assert that it is much worse than reported, that it's so bad that the Sons of Liberty are afraid to let it be known least the people should be discouraged. Is not this intolerable?...they propagate every intelligence they receive, taking care to calculate it so as to serve their own turn; its beyond a matter of doubt that they keep up a secret correspondence through the colonies in order to comfort one another to keep up their sinking spirits and to propagate falsehoods..." (see). In light of on-going accusations by political parties today that news reports are manipulated to serve their own interests, it is fascinating to find the same happened during the Revolutionary War so many years ago.Blog-4-13-2015-Sons-of-Liberty

A National calamity… What is one to do?

April 3, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

What does one do when abruptly ushered into one, if not the, most powerful positions on earth by the untimely death of the President of the United States? Today, in honor of the Easter Holiday Weekend, we reach back to 1841 to see how newly elevated President John Tyler responded when placed in this situation. The following proclamation, which begins in part, "When a Christian people feel themselves to be overtaken by a great public calamity, it becomes them to humble themselves under the dispensation of Divine Providence, to recognize His righteous government over the children of men, to acknowledge His goodness in time past, as well as their own unworthiness, and to supplicate His merciful protection for the future...", was printed in The Globe, Washington, D.C., April 15, 1841:Blog-4-3-2015-Tyler-Proclamation

Happy Easter from the Rare & Early Newspapers Team

 

Yet another discovery… I love this hobby!

March 27, 2015 by · 1 Comment 

From time-to-time we (Rare & Early Newspapers) talk about one of the joys of the hobby being the unearthing of unexpected "finds". A few weeks ago this was played out in spades as [caption id="" align="alignright" width="182"] Guy Heilenman, President, Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers[/caption] we learned that the same issue we had sold for under $50 sold at a well-known auction house for well over $5,000 - the price driven by content we did not know was present. While we do our best to discover such hidden gems before offering issues, the reality is, it is nearly impossible to find everything of historical interest and/or collectable value. Some wonder if hearing about such events bothers us. Quite the contrary. This is one of characteristics of collecting old newspapers which make the hobby so enjoyable. While not all "finds" bring financial reward, it is rare to read through a rare newspaper from cover to cover without finding something unexpected beyond the original reason for purchasing - an interesting ad, the mention of a noteworthy name, contemporary viewpoints which add depth to the key content, etc. What fun! While we won't mention the exact date or title (that would be too easy), we will say the issue was from the 1760's and was not American. :)

First reference to “Ivy League”?

March 13, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Blog-4-17-2015-Ivy-LeagueSome words including names, titles,  etc. are so noteworthy or common that we forget they had a beginning - a first use. According to Wikipedia, the first public use (in print) of the term "Ivy League" occurred within the Christian Science Monitor, Boston, February 7, 1935. The usage was in reference to Brown University being accepted into the "League". A quick search on The New York Times database shows that it did not print the title until nearly a half-year later. Is Wikipedia correct? Until we see confirmation to the contrary we'll assume their assessment to be accurate. If anyone has information to the contrary, please let us know.

Bloody Sunday, Selma, Alabama… Great Headlines Speak For Themselves…

March 11, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

The best headlines need no commentary. Such is the case with the FITCHBURG SENTINEL, Massachusetts, March 8, 1965...Blog-3-11-2015-Selma-Alabama

They put it in print… Castro given a year or less…

February 23, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Blog-2-23-2015-CastroHistorical perspective offers so much as we reflect upon some of the headlines of the past, particularly those proven to be so wrong. With the reestablishing of relations with Cuba currently in the headlines, we dug through out archives and found a headline which history has shown could not have been more wrong.  The "Detroit Free Press" of October 20, 1960, in announcing the beginning of the embargo against Cuba, ran a banner headline: "CASTRO COLLAPSE FORESEEN" and one of the subheads noting: "Fidel Given Year or Less".  This is now a newspaper much more interesting today than it was almost 55 years ago. What a fascinating hobby!

They put it in print… First appearance of an American flag?

February 13, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Many in our hobby like to pursuit the very first time "they put it in print" and the "it" can be a very wide range of announcements, reports, or images. Certainly first reports of major 18th Blog-2-13-2015-1st-flag-in-newspaperand 19th century battles have been among the favored issues of collectors, and most certainly the first printing of ht Declaration of Independence in a newspaper commands a considerable premium among those who are able to consummate that pursuit. Two collectors, Michael Zinman and Steve Lomazow, raised an interesting question: what newspaper was the first to include a print of the U.S. flag within its pages? After discovering several newspapers from 1847 and then 1840 with flag engravings, we found in our database the "True American & Commercial Advertiser" from Philadelphia, 1806 which incorporates a U.S. flag (albeit a small engraving: see photo) within the masthead image (see sample). The newspaper actually began in 1798 but that didn't mean the masthead engraving was there. Typically mastheads change, often several times, through the life cycle of a newspaper. But a confirmation from Vincent Golden, newspaper librarian at the American Antiquarian Society, which has holdings of this title going back to issue number 1, confirms the engraving with the flag is, indeed, present with that very first issue. So this sets the earliest appearance of the U.S. flag in a newspaper at July 1, 1798. But I'm not convinced this is the earliest date. Are any of you collectors aware of an earlier appearance? Check your collections and share with the rest of us!

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