My collecting story… Z.H. in Benton, Missouri…

May 11, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

Below we continue our series in which we post the “stories” graciously submitted by our collecting friends during the pandemic of 2020.

My favorite issue is a September 1820 publication from the Niles’ Register. This specific issue contains one of the earliest non-archived and complete printings of the Missouri Constitution that I know to exist. I am a judge for the State of Missouri, so its personal value to me is beyond words. While there have been a total of six constitutions adopted for the State of Missouri in the last 200 years, to hold a complete copy of the original, published immediately after ratification and adoption, is quite something.

This issue is displayed on a bureau in my office just behind my courtroom. Talk about a conversation piece! But much more than that, seeing this piece of history every morning helps to reaffirm a sincere admiration for those who, for better or worse, have formed our respective governments. To establish government is no small feat. This document breathes inspiration as much as it tells a story of immense cooperation. The writers of this document, much like our Founders, united together in common principles of representation, enforcement, and justice. As a judge, my job is to protect this document, and to make sure everyone has equal access to its privileges and protections. Quite simply, it’s humbling, and owning this copy as part of my collection has been a treat to say the least.

So thank you to everyone at Timothy Hughes Rare and Early Newspapers for making this piece available. It really is a treasure!

As additional “stories” are posted they will be available at: MY COLLECTING STORY. We did this many years ago as well – and their posts are also included.

 

My collecting story… M.R. in Singapore…

May 8, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

Below we continue our series in which we post the “stories” graciously submitted by our collecting friends during the pandemic of 2020.

My fascination with antiquity generally and old publications specifically began when I was a young child, although I clearly didn’t have the means to acquire them way back then. I have always been fascinated with history, and thus old publications (newspapers, magazines and books) accord one a precious opportunity to come face-to-face with the very publications people read contemporaneous to the events of the period, be they revolutions, a civil war, a presidential inauguration or assassination, or a whole host of other events of historical import. There is even a ‘tactile sensation’ that gives much pleasure in knowing that you are actually leafing through pages originally perused by others up to 300 or even 400 years back! In the case of newspapers in particular, there is also that intellectual joy of reading what are basically primary historical sources, thereby relishing the very

THE BOSTON CHRONICLE, Dec. 12, 1768

‘flavour’ of the reports of the times and the sometimes strong or biased opinions put forth by editors or letters published from readers.

It is exceedingly difficult to identify the one publication that I would value the most, over any other. In my case it is a tie between two very different historical periods: the 1760s and 1770s, in which one finds myriad accounts of the events leading up to the American Revolution; and the newspapers of April 1865, which came out in the wake of the assassination of one of America’s greatest presidents, Abraham Lincoln. What makes the former category especially interesting in both British and American papers is the fact that on neither side of the ‘pond’ was opinion monolithic by any means with respect to the stirrings in the colonies which ultimately led to revolution. There were British political leaders and merchants who were strongly in favour of letting the Americans have their independence. One in particular was highly prescient in that he foresaw that one day America would emerge as a great power and that it was therefore best to cultivate good relations with was to become a new republic sooner rather than later. At the same time, there were American loyalists who could not envisage a total break with the Crown and thus regarded the revolution as an unwanted tragedy. What makes the newspapers subsequent to Lincoln’s assassination especially interesting is the fact that one can feel a palpable sense of grief and anger in the immediate aftermath – regardless of what they may have been saying about President Lincoln when he was still alive! I feel teleported back in time and place to the scene of the crime as well as to the intense mourning that followed as Lincoln’s funeral train wound its way from Washington back to Illinois, with outpourings of sorrow all over the nation.

Finally, there was indeed a most pleasant surprise awaiting me in an entire volume of ‘The Gentleman’s Magazine’ for 1776, which I happened upon in an antiquarian shop in my part of the world (Singapore) many years ago. I acquired it for an amount so small that I considered it insignificant. While I felt sure there would be many articles of interest with regard to the outbreak of the American Revolution, I was absolutely beside myself with joy to discover that the American Declaration of Independence had been reproduced in it! I certainly hadn’t expected that. Interestingly, the following month’s issue had some sharp critiques of the rationale upon which the Americans had clamored and then declared their independence of Britain. The condition of the whole collection was uniformly good indeed, and the binding appeared to be original as well.

For these reasons and many more, collecting old publications is a hobby – or perhaps I should say a *passion* – that brings unending joy!

As additional “stories” are posted they will be available at: MY COLLECTING STORY. We did this many years ago as well – and their posts are also included.

 

My collecting story… D.P. in Brentwood, TN…

April 27, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

Below we continue our series in which we post the “stories” graciously submitted by our collecting friends during the pandemic of 2020.

My Favorite Newspaper from Timothy & Guy…

Back in 2009 the list had an 1856 copy of the Concord (NH) Patriot and State Gazette which included an ad for Flagg & Aymar’s Circus. I bought the paper because, being a circus historian, I knew that old John Robinson had sold his interest in the Robinson and Eldred circus to his partner Gil Eldred in Richmond, VA, that year and had used the money to purchase the Flagg & Aymar show, renaming it John Robinson’s Circus. Under several ownerships the title was active as late as 1930 and was advertised as the oldest circus in America,

The plot thickens: Several items that were delivered to my porch on the same day vanished- to this day I am certain who stole them for spite over my firing a certain party.

Time passes and in 2015 I called Guy and asked if there was any possibility of their having another copy of that paper. By sheer coincidence they had one and intended to add it to the next list. I bought it as quickly as I can tell the story. Here the ad is in my little circus museum in Nashville.

As additional “stories” are posted they will be available at: MY COLLECTING STORY. We did this many years ago as well – and their posts are also included.

 

The April (2020) Newsletter from Rare & Early Newspapers…

April 17, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

Monthly Newsletter ~ Rare & Early Newspapers
Welcome to the April 2020 edition of our monthly newsletter. Our hope and prayer is for everyone’s health and general well-being.
This month we’d like to direct your attention to newly discounted items on our website, two historical items of Jewish interest, brand new items (just released), a continued opportunity to “tell your story”, and a bonus discount for items posted on eBay. Please enjoy.
*Discounted Newspapers – 50% off – We are offering well over 200 items (over 100 new items) at a 50% discount through May 14, 2020. The prices shown already reflect the discount.
New Titles, New Topics, New Listings – We’ve added over 25 new items to our website since the April catalog was released. The set includes a few titles which we’ve never offered and a variety of new topics: New Offerings
Two Great Jewish-Themed Items – We’ve just listed two new items on eBay which have rare, historic, Judaic reports – one being listed as the 2nd most significant report in Jewish-American history:
Speaking of eBay – From now through Sunday at midnight we are offering our Buy It Now (fixed price) eBay items at 20% off for cart totals which eclipse $200 (excluding storage options and certificates): eBay Discount
Catalog 293 – Enjoy the remaining items from our latest catalog of historic newspapers. The most collectible items may be viewed at: Key Catalog 293 Issues
Tell Your Story – Dozens of collectors have already responded to our offer to tell their newspaper collecting story. We’ll be posting them at random on the History’s Newsstand Blog over the next few months. What’s been posted thus far may be viewed at:
My Collecting Story
In case you missed it, please know it is not too late to participate. The offer, as it was written a few weeks ago stated:
Are you climbing the walls? Are you looking for something to do that will enable you to stay indoors yet won’t cost you a penny? After all, one can only spend so many hours binge-streaming movies, documentaries, and TV shows before boredom sets in. Additionally, since many of our collecting friends have little to no income stream at the moment (not to mention the hit our retirement portfolios have taken), we’d like to offer everyone an opportunity to do something a little different.
As most of you know, we at Rare & Early Newspapers maintain the History’s Newsstand Blog – which is an effort to spread the love of the hobby. While most of us have experienced the joy of preserving history, reading news from the day it was first reported, and finding hidden gems buried within newspapers we’ve collected, the average person has no idea the collectible even exists. Yet, growing the hobby helps us all as the more people who discover the pleasures spawned by collecting original newspapers, the more issues are preserved (not discarded due to the belief they have no value), and the more their value increases over time. It’s a win-win-win (we win, they win, and the preservation of history through available original reporting wins). So,what am I suggesting?
Would you consider guest-writing a post for the History’s Newsstand Blog?
I would like to offer three topics to consider:
  • Which issue within your collection do you value the most and why?
  • Have you ever found something you consider special within an issue you’ve collected that you did not know was present prior to your decision to obtain it? If so, what did you find?
  • Why do you collect rare/historic newspapers? How did you get started? Tell us your story.
If you decide to contribute please send your “post” to me at guy@rarenewspapers.com – or simply reply to this email. I will gather them together and begin to post them over the next few months. I will only include your initials and state – no personal contact information will be shown. As an added bonus, all who contribute will receive a discount code for 10% off a future website order. Since income for many is currently limited, and others who have more to spare are using it to help family, friends and others who are in need (by far the greater priority), the coupon will not expire until the end of the year so as to allow things to settle and then rebound economically. Note: the coupon may be used for any-size order, but may only be used once.
Please know this “discount” is in no way intended to increase our sales. Although we are all currently stressed economically, I know Who holds my future – so all is well when viewed through the lens of eternity. However, I do want to say “thank you” to those who are willing to share their thoughts with the collecting community. Let’s just have some fun in the midst of a difficult situation! 🙂

Thanks for collecting with us.Sincerely,

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team
RareNewspapers.com
570-326-1045

Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers . . .
           . . . History’s Newsstand
“…desiring to conduct ourselves honorably in all things.” Hebrews 13:18b
See what’s happening on our social sites

My collecting story… M.B. in Sedro-Woolley, WA…

April 9, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

Below we continue our series in which we post the “stories” graciously submitted by our collecting friends during the pandemic of 2020.

I’ve been collecting newspapers of historic events for 50 years. In a purchase last year I was interested in a July 1960 New York Times front page story on the Democratic Party’s nomination of John Kennedy for president. As I perused the inside content I found the real treasure: the Books of The Times review of Harper Lee’s new novel “To Kill a Mockingbird” written by Herbert Mitgang. Many years ago, I worked with his son Lee Mitgang at the Associated Press in New York City.

As additional “stories” are posted they will be available at: MY COLLECTING STORY. We did this many years ago as well – and their posts are also included.

 

My collecting story… J.R. in Ipswich (UK)…

April 7, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

Below we continue our series in which we post the “stories” graciously submitted by our collecting friends during the pandemic of 2020.

In 1945 at the end of the war I was eight and saw my father save the Daily Telegraph proclaiming VE (victory in Europe) Day. I was already an avid newspaper reader (no television then) and decided to add newspapers I found interesting – VJ Day, Nuremberg Trials, Princess Elizabeth wedding, Dakota plane lost in the Alps etc. Soon people gave me old newspapers they had – an aunt gave me Edward/ Mrs Simpson abdication papers and my grandparents two 18th century ones.

This slow rate of collecting continued until the mid 1980s when my income allowed me to spend on myself as well as a wife and the children. I found book shops in London, where we lived at the time, where I could fill the gaps in years which were blank and have reference to most historical events, particularly those relating to improvements in social well-being. By this time I had all years from 1661 and references to most riots, bread marches, demonstrations for improved parliamentary representation, and suffragettes.

The children having long departed and my wife having died I found I had more time (and money) and now am collecting titles as my main interest. This means I am acquiring and understanding how newspapers were able to develop and change their format and means of attracting customers.The growth of size, number of pages, type change, introduction of illustrations and then photographs. Also the relationships of one newspaper to another and the takeovers, combinations and title changes. Now of course I am monitoring their decline.

By collecting different titles I have been able to acquire many short lived extreme left and right wing newspapers and also Irish Republican ones.

After 75 years collecting I now have over 3600 newspapers going back to 1642 and 1900 different titles. What am I going to do with them? None of my family wants them although I am still working on one son-in-law, so they are being offered to my local museum in Ipswich- after many more years of my collecting!

As additional “stories” are posted they will be available at: MY COLLECTING STORY. We did this many years ago as well – and their posts are also included.

 

Collector Historic Newspapers – A discussion with Tim Hughes…

March 27, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

On March 3, 2020 Mike Safo conducted a podcast with the Tim Hughes, founder of Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers. His textual intro. to the podcast states:

Joined today by the owner and founder of Rarenewspapers.com, Timothy Hughes. Tim and I talk about our weird passion of collecting newspapers and discuss the current state of collecting and the industry today. We chat about his infamous hometown of Williamsport, Pennsylvania, the home of the Little League World Series. How before the newspaper business Tim was employed by Little League International. He talks about the famous 1980 World Series and how that put the LLWS on the map and golfing with Mike Mussina. Tim takes us back to collecting coins and stamps and how buying a 3-dollar newspaper changed everything. From leaving employment with Little League International to how he acquired over a million newspapers from the 1600a to present day. He tells us which newspaper’s he’ll never sell, which are the most in demand and why the hobby is growing.

The entire, informative podcast can be heard at: Mike Safo’s Interview With Tim Hughes

 

Mike describes himself as: “Just a regular New York City guy who gets to interview some pretty amazing people… A conversation/hangout podcast with friends, athletes, authors, celebrities, fighters, and the world’s most fascinating people. ‘The greatest podcast ever’ – My Mom”

March through the years via the lens of Rare & Early Newspapers…

March 6, 2020 by · 4 Comments 

Walk with us back through time to see what noteworthy, historic and collectible events occurred during the month of February. In so doing, we hope you’ll agree: “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.”

March Through Time

The February (2020) Newsletter from Rare & Early Newspapers…

February 17, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

Each month the staff of Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers sends out a newsletter to our members which includes special offers, discounts, alerts to new inventory, and information related to the rare newspaper collectible.

The February, 2020 newsletter:

Our most recent newsletter is as follows:

Welcome to the February Newsletter from Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers. Whereas typically a newsletter would focus on Newly Discounted Items (50% off through March 12th), the remaining items from our current catalog (Catalog 281), new posts on the History’s Newsstand Blog, under-the-radar listings which are quite desirable (such as those with Botany Bay and/or Captain Cook content), New Items (outstanding listed after Catalog 291 was released), etc., this month we’d like to bring your attention to three special offerings:
like to bring your attention to three special offerings:

  • A Snapshot in Time – May, 1863 – featuring the Battle of Chancellorsville and the wounding and death of Stonewall Jackson.
  • An incredible issue on the Bombing of Hiroshima – book-ending the beginning an end of American involvement in World War 2 – the first of its kind we have ever had. Note: The most desirable issue regarding the attack on Pearl Harbor is the key report in The Honolulu Star Bulletin. The Bombing of Hiroshima issue in question is a dramatic report on the bombing in this same title.
  • A Free Newspaper – We are offering up to 25 free newspapers from London dated in 1790 – an original printed over 2 1/4 centuries ago. All we ask is for you to pay S&H (standard S&H criteria applies).
Of course this isn’t to say the Newly Discounted Items (50% off through March 12th), the remaining items from our current catalog (Catalog 281), new posts on the History’s Newsstand Blog, under-the-radar listings which are quite desirable (such as those with Botany Bay and/or Captain Cook content), New Items (outstanding listed after Catalog 291 was released), etc., are not worth exploring. 🙂

Thanks for collecting with us.Sincerely,

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team

Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers . . .
           . . . History’s Newsstand
“…desiring to conduct ourselves honorably in all things.” Hebrews 13:18b
See what’s happening on our social sites

xxxxx

Thanks for collecting with us.

 

Sincerely,

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team

February through the years via the lens of Rare & Early Newspapers…

February 10, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

Walk with us back through time to see what noteworthy, historic and collectible events occurred during the month of February. In so doing, we hope you’ll agree: “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.”

February Through Time

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