The Civil War… 150 years ago… January 18, 1862…

January 18, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Today we continue our look back on the Civil War as reported within the newspapers held by those living during the Civil War… 150 years ago to-date (of this post). While many of the issues shown below are no longer available for sale, reading a snap-shot of what was printed for the given day will hopefully provide a glimpse of life during the critical period in American history. Each link shown will take you to the full description w/ images of authentic issues which were held by those living during the Civil War. Today’s selections are:

Rare Confederate title…
DAILY RICHMOND EXAMINER, Richmond, Virginia, January 18, 1862 Not only is this a nice newspaper from the Confederacy, but it is from the Confederate capital. The Front page has: “The War In South Carolina” and: “Notes Of The War–The North Growing Sick of the War–The New York Tribune Thinks it Time the War Were Brought to a Close” with other subheads including: “Great Battles” “The Northern War Patriots…” “The War in Kentucky–Plans of the enemy…” “The War In Missouri–The Situation”. War-related coverage continues to page 2 with : “The Latest Northern News–Movements & Spirit of the War” “The Northern Congress–Discussion on the Negro Question–Lovejoy’s Declaration of War Against Great Britain” “Revocation of Commissions in the Army” “Appointment of Brigadier-Generals” and other items. Page 3 has reports from the Virginia Legislature and “The Cores”, “City Intelligence”, a few small war-related items, and some ads. Page 2 also features some nice editorial content, always interesting reading in this newspaper as the editor was rabidly anti-North. He begins with: “The resignation & honorable exile of Cameron, that synonym of corruption, is a significant event. It is the signal of the open disruption of the united North into two factions…” with more…
From Confederate New Orleans…
THE DAILY DELTA, New Orleans, Louisiana, January 18, 1862 * Rare confederate title from the deep South Truly Confederate newspapers from New Orleans are very difficult to find, as Admiral Farragut entered the mouth of the Mississippi in mid-April, 1862 and finally took New Orleans on April 28. Shortly thereafter Benjamin Butler moved in and took control of the city which surrendered without a fight. So “Confederate” issues from New Orleans are limited to those published between Louisiana’s secession from the Union on January 26, 1861 and the end of April, 1862, just a brief 15 month period. Front page war-related item include: “What the Morning Journals Say” which begins: “The Crescent speaks of the many theories put forth by the Lincolnites to account for their defeats in the present war–every one as far from the truth as the North will ever be from conquering the South if the war should last a century…”. Also: “Letters From Baton Rouge” which takes over a full column. And: “From The Seat of War In Virginia”. There are additional war-related items on pages 2 & 3 also with most of the bkpg. taken up with ads. Among the ftpg. ads is an illustrated one for; “Negroes For Sale”…
A rare Confederate title…
WESTERN SENTINEL, Winston, North Carolina, January 18, 1862 This is a very rare title from the Confederacy. According to Brigham only four institutions in the United States have any holdings of this title from the Civil War, most just a few scattered issues. The American Antiquarian Society has no issues recorded from this era. Nice content in this issue, as the ftpg. has: “Letter from G. W. Brownlow–His Treatment” while in prison (see photos). Also: “The Missouri Swamp Fox which is on General M. Jeff. Thompson; plus: “Bishop Hughes in Favor of the Confederate States”. Pg. 2 has more Civil War news with: “The Election: “Departure of Troops” “The News” which has many war reports; also: “Northern News” “Then and Now” “Re-Enlistment” and “Drafting Soldiers”. The war reporting continues on pg. 3 with: “Latest News–Suspension of Yankee Banks” “French Man of War Fired Into” “From the West” “The Financial Bull Run” “A Consoling Belief” “Prosperity of the South” “A Yankee Sermon” and more. The war coverage continues on the bkpg. as well with: “Why the Federals do not Advance in South Carolina” among other items. Ads on the bkpg. as well. Complete in 4 pages, scattered foxing throughout, a minor pg. 2 archival mend near the bottom, generally quite nice. Measures about 11 1/2 by 17 1/2 inches. An opportunity for not only a very rare Confederate title, but one with extensive war content.
1862 New York City Newspaper… General Burnside… General Doubleday…
THE EVENING POST, New York, January 18, 1862 * Major Abner Doubleday made General – General Burnside and much more * Original Civil War era complete issue on cotton & rag paper * The War Against Slavery, Abraham Lincoln’s War, the 2nd War For Independence This 4 page newspaper is in nice condition (except for little margin wear & tear) due to the use of cotton and rag paper during this very historic time in U.S. history. This issue is very large in size (unusual). It measures 30 x 26 inches and loaded with advertisements and Civil War reports throughout from the day it was first reported.
Winslow Homer…  Burnside’s Expedition…
Harper’s WEEKLY, Jan. 18, 1862 Ftpg. shows; ‘Fort Royal Ferry, Scene of the Battle of First Jan.’ & ‘Scene in the Parlor of Mr. Barnwell’s House at Beaufort, S.C.’ shows a Black family lounging & playing the piano. Fullpg: ‘The Vessels of Gen. Burnside’s Expedition at Annapolis’ halfpg: ‘The War In Va.–A Reconnaissance in a Laurel Brake’ ‘ & ‘Bringing In Rebel Prisoners’ & ‘The Union Prisoners at Richmond, Va.’dblpgctrfld: ‘The City of Richmond, Va.’ fullpg. by Winslow Homer: ‘The Skating Season’

One collector’s passion…

January 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

Old newspapers are not only great “stand alone” collectibles, but many collect them to be used as companion pieces to a separate primary interest.  A fellow collector recently obtained what would normally have been considered a rather nondescript issue of Harper’s Weekly.  However, after reading his note, I was reminded of the breadth of our favorite pass-time… rare & early newspapers.  Please enjoy his story:

Hello, Guy…

I received the above order this past Saturday [a Harper’s Weekly, November 12, 1904, from New York, with “A Bird’s-Eye View of New York’s Rapid Transit Plans for the Future” by H. M. Pettit].  Ordinarily, I would not go to this length to confirm receipt of your fine products, but this is about a unique affair…something very different for me, and one – quite honestly – I never imagined would “come true”.

As you know, I’ve been studying the history of New York’s original Pennsylvania Station for many years now, and these studies have taken me on some incredible “journeys” through the land of (original) archival documents that have, some how, survived the “test of time”.  I purchased one of your portfolios because what I recently acquired is so exceptional, it deserves a special place to reside in my archive.

Earlier this month, I inadvertently came upon an issued/cancelled stock certificate that is directly related to the construction of Pennsylvania Station…undeniably the most distinctive “find” I’ve made since I first pursued this subject years ago.  What I actually found was a PDF link to the pages of a Spink Smythe auction catalog (pictured below, as Lot #516), the event having taken place in February 2010…Spink, with offices worldwide, specializes in rare stocks, bonds, and paper currency.

The significance of this document is that the Pennsylvania, New York & Long Island Rail Road was one of two “pioneering” ventures (the other being the Pennsylvania, New Jersey & New York Railroad) created in 1902 by the Pennsylvania Railroad to basically enact the provisions of its franchise agreement with the City of New York to build Penn Station and its sub-river tunnels, uniting Manhattan (by rail) with mainland America.  These two small railroads – with a combined length of less than 20 miles – were consolidated in 1907 to form one operating authority, the Pennsylvania Tunnel & Terminal Railroad.  Given the short “lifespan” and relatively low profile of these two railroads during the years of Penn Station’s construction, any documents pertaining to their existence (that have survived to this day) are very scarce.

I’ve had previous – though limited – experience with the Spink auction house, so I immediately “launched” an investigation into this document, and learned it did not sell at this February 2010 auction!  Within a week or so, I made contact with a Spink official (in London, their corporate location) who not only confirmed the status of this item at that auction, but referred me to its consignee, to whom Spink returned the unsold certificate.

Not knowing what I was “in for” from this point onward, I telephoned the consignee, only to discover he is a reputable vendor of stock certificates and bank notes in New Hampshire…extremely knowledgeable, and an absolute pleasure to do business with.  I’m sure – privately – he couldn’t believe somebody was calling him (from California, no less!) about a certificate that didn’t sell at auction so long ago, but we, nonetheless, had a wonderful conversation.  Lo and behold, after briefly searching his inventory (of Spink returns), he called me back to say he found the certificate I was interested in.  He offered it to me at a good price, and I now have this most incredible document (previously, a “distant”, digitized image from a nearly two-year-old catalog) in my possession.

While the “railroad-related” signatures and seals on the certificate are “chock-full” of history (and worth everything to me), an unexpected “bonus” surfaced when the vendor made note of the individual to whom this stock was issued…Clement A. Griscom.  He suggested this person might be worth researching, so – while I awaited the certificate’s arrival – I did just that!  Born 1841 in Philadelphia (died in 1912), Clement Griscom – pictured in his

1899 portrait above – was not your “everyday” stockholder, but, rather, a prominent shipping magnate…President of the International Navigation (steamship) Company.  In 1902, he engaged Pierpont (J.P.) Morgan to finance the merger of International Navigation with five additional steamship lines, including a portion of Holland America, and the White Star Line (of Titanic fame).  The Pennsylvania Railroad also retained Mr. Griscom as a director in their Northeast region for many years.

To set this monumental document before you is nothing short of dazzling…printed on watermarked (almost parchment-like) paper, the graphics are precise and impeccably executed.  Handwritten inscriptions, such as Clement Griscom’s name and a date (July 1, 1902) – presumably entered by a secretary – and two signatures along the bottom, are all in black (fountain pen) ink, and very legible.  The legendary Vice President of the Pennsylvania Railroad, Samuel Rea, signed the certificate to the right, and a very curious Treasurer’s signature – that of eminent 50-year PRR veteran “T {Taber} Ashton – pictured below, graces the left hand corner.

Adjacent to Mr. Ashton’s signature is the “wonder of it all”…a perfectly-embossed seal of the Pennsylvania, New York & Long Island Rail Road, whose name encircles the words, “New York 1902”.  On the reverse side of this certificate [IMG 0095] is another set (“trio”) of beautiful graphics that were intended to be “showcased” when the document was folded in “thirds”.  Fortunately, it was never folded, which certainly enhances its value and charm.  The certificate looks wonderful in the portfolio…a perfect place to keep it for future reference, and to ensure its posterity.

As always…many thanks…

Ed

A suggestion by young men…

January 14, 2012 by · Leave a Comment 

The following items from the March 21, 1874 issue of “Harper’s Weekly” is self-explanatory:

The Civil War… December 28, 1861…

December 28, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

This week we return to our reflection upon the Civil War events of 150 years ago… as seen through the eyes of the original readers of the Harper’s Weekly issue printed for December 28, 1861.

Note:  The following commentary was written by Dr. James Robertson* as part of a weekly review for the reprint edition of the “Harper’s Weekly” which was done at the 100th anniversary of the Civil War.  It provides much insight into the events of the day and scholarly commentary on both the illustrations and reporting found in the original 1861 newspaper.

* The Virginia Tech website provides the credentials of Dr. James Roberson:

“One of the most distinguished names in Civil War history, Dr. Robertson was Executive Director of the U.S. Civil War Centennial Commission and worked with Presidents Truman, Kennedy, and Johnson in marking the war’s 100th anniversary.  Today his Civil War Era course at Virginia Tech, which attracts 300 students per semester, is the largest of its kind in the nation.
The Danville, Va., native is the author or editor of more than 20 books that include such award-winning studies as “Civil War! America Becomes One Nation”, “General A.P. Hill”, and “Soldiers Blue and Gray”. His massive biography of Gen. “Stonewall” Jackson won eight national awards and was used as the base for the Ted Turner/Warner Bros. mega-movie, “Gods and Generals”. Robertson was chief historical consultant for the film.”

The Civil War… November 2, 1861…

November 2, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

This week we continue with the our reflection upon the Civil War events of 150 years ago… as seen through the eyes of the original readers of the Harper’s Weekly issue printed for November 2, 1861.

Note:  The following commentary was written by Dr. James Robertson* as part of a weekly review for the reprint edition of the “Harper’s Weekly” which was done at the 100th anniversary of the Civil War.  It provides much insight into the events of the day and scholarly commentary on both the illustrations and reporting found in the original 1861 newspaper.

* The Virginia Tech website provides the credentials of Dr. James Roberson:

“One of the most distinguished names in Civil War history, Dr. Robertson was Executive Director of the U.S. Civil War Centennial Commission and worked with Presidents Truman, Kennedy, and Johnson in marking the war’s 100th anniversary.  Today his Civil War Era course at Virginia Tech, which attracts 300 students per semester, is the largest of its kind in the nation.
The Danville, Va., native is the author or editor of more than 20 books that include such award-winning studies as “Civil War! America Becomes One Nation”, “General A.P. Hill”, and “Soldiers Blue and Gray”. His massive biography of Gen. “Stonewall” Jackson won eight national awards and was used as the base for the Ted Turner/Warner Bros. mega-movie, “Gods and Generals”. Robertson was chief historical consultant for the film.”

The Civil War… October 26, 1861…

October 26, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

This week we continue with the our reflection upon the Civil War events of 150 years ago… as seen through the eyes of the original readers of the Harper’s Weekly issue printed for October 26, 1861.

Note:  The following commentary was written by Dr. James Robertson* as part of a weekly review for the reprint edition of the “Harper’s Weekly” which was done at the 100th anniversary of the Civil War.  It provides much insight into the events of the day and scholarly commentary on both the illustrations and reporting found in the original 1861 newspaper.

* The Virginia Tech website provides the credentials of Dr. James Roberson:

“One of the most distinguished names in Civil War history, Dr. Robertson was Executive Director of the U.S. Civil War Centennial Commission and worked with Presidents Truman, Kennedy, and Johnson in marking the war’s 100th anniversary.  Today his Civil War Era course at Virginia Tech, which attracts 300 students per semester, is the largest of its kind in the nation.
The Danville, Va., native is the author or editor of more than 20 books that include such award-winning studies as “Civil War! America Becomes One Nation”, “General A.P. Hill”, and “Soldiers Blue and Gray”. His massive biography of Gen. “Stonewall” Jackson won eight national awards and was used as the base for the Ted Turner/Warner Bros. mega-movie, “Gods and Generals”. Robertson was chief historical consultant for the film.”

The Civil War… October 19, 1861…

October 19, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

This week we continue with the our reflection upon the Civil War events of 150 years ago… as seen through the eyes of the original readers of the Harper’s Weekly issue printed for October 19, 1861.

Note:  The following commentary was written by Dr. James Robertson* as part of a weekly review for the reprint edition of the “Harper’s Weekly” which was done at the 100th anniversary of the Civil War.  It provides much insight into the events of the day and scholarly commentary on both the illustrations and reporting found in the original 1861 newspaper.

* The Virginia Tech website provides the credentials of Dr. James Roberson:

“One of the most distinguished names in Civil War history, Dr. Robertson was Executive Director of the U.S. Civil War Centennial Commission and worked with Presidents Truman, Kennedy, and Johnson in marking the war’s 100th anniversary.  Today his Civil War Era course at Virginia Tech, which attracts 300 students per semester, is the largest of its kind in the nation.
The Danville, Va., native is the author or editor of more than 20 books that include such award-winning studies as “Civil War! America Becomes One Nation”, “General A.P. Hill”, and “Soldiers Blue and Gray”. His massive biography of Gen. “Stonewall” Jackson won eight national awards and was used as the base for the Ted Turner/Warner Bros. mega-movie, “Gods and Generals”. Robertson was chief historical consultant for the film.”

The Civil War… October 12, 1861…

October 12, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

This week we continue with the our reflection upon the Civil War events of 150 years ago… as seen through the eyes of the original readers of the Harper’s Weekly issue printed for October 12, 1861.

Note:  The following commentary was written by Dr. James Robertson* as part of a weekly review for the reprint edition of the “Harper’s Weekly” which was done at the 100th anniversary of the Civil War.  It provides much insight into the events of the day and scholarly commentary on both the illustrations and reporting found in the original 1861 newspaper.

* The Virginia Tech website provides the credentials of Dr. James Roberson:

“One of the most distinguished names in Civil War history, Dr. Robertson was Executive Director of the U.S. Civil War Centennial Commission and worked with Presidents Truman, Kennedy, and Johnson in marking the war’s 100th anniversary.  Today his Civil War Era course at Virginia Tech, which attracts 300 students per semester, is the largest of its kind in the nation.
The Danville, Va., native is the author or editor of more than 20 books that include such award-winning studies as “Civil War! America Becomes One Nation”, “General A.P. Hill”, and “Soldiers Blue and Gray”. His massive biography of Gen. “Stonewall” Jackson won eight national awards and was used as the base for the Ted Turner/Warner Bros. mega-movie, “Gods and Generals”. Robertson was chief historical consultant for the film.”

The Civil War… October 5, 1861…

October 5, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

This week we continue with the our reflection upon the Civil War events of 150 years ago… as seen through the eyes of the original readers of the Harper’s Weekly issue printed for October 5, 1861.

Note:  The following commentary was written by Dr. James Robertson* as part of a weekly review for the reprint edition of the “Harper’s Weekly” which was done at the 100th anniversary of the Civil War.  It provides much insight into the events of the day and scholarly commentary on both the illustrations and reporting found in the original 1861 newspaper:

* The Virginia Tech website provides the credentials of Dr. James Roberson:

“One of the most distinguished names in Civil War history, Dr. Robertson was Executive Director of the U.S. Civil War Centennial Commission and worked with Presidents Truman, Kennedy, and Johnson in marking the war’s 100th anniversary.  Today his Civil War Era course at Virginia Tech, which attracts 300 students per semester, is the largest of its kind in the nation.
The Danville, Va., native is the author or editor of more than 20 books that include such award-winning studies as “Civil War! America Becomes One Nation”, “General A.P. Hill”, and “Soldiers Blue and Gray”. His massive biography of Gen. “Stonewall” Jackson won eight national awards and was used as the base for the Ted Turner/Warner Bros. mega-movie, “Gods and Generals”. Robertson was chief historical consultant for the film.”

The Civil War… September 28, 1861…

September 28, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

We continue with the our reflection upon the Civil War events of 150 years ago… as seen through the eyes of the original readers of the Harper’s Weekly issue printed for September 28, 1861.

Note:  The following commentary was written by Dr. James Robertson* as part of a weekly review for the reprint edition of the “Harper’s Weekly” which was done at the 100th anniversary of the Civil War.  It provides much insight into the events of the day and scholarly commentary on both the illustrations and reporting found in the original 1861 newspaper:

* The Virginia Tech website provides the credentials of Dr. James Roberson:

“One of the most distinguished names in Civil War history, Dr. Robertson was Executive Director of the U.S. Civil War Centennial Commission and worked with Presidents Truman, Kennedy, and Johnson in marking the war’s 100th anniversary.  Today his Civil War Era course at Virginia Tech, which attracts 300 students per semester, is the largest of its kind in the nation.
The Danville, Va., native is the author or editor of more than 20 books that include such award-winning studies as “Civil War! America Becomes One Nation”, “General A.P. Hill”, and “Soldiers Blue and Gray”. His massive biography of Gen. “Stonewall” Jackson won eight national awards and was used as the base for the Ted Turner/Warner Bros. mega-movie, “Gods and Generals”. Robertson was chief historical consultant for the film.”

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