Fascinating Conspiracies (Episode 1) – The Lincoln Conspirators…

October 21, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 
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Sometimes it is difficult to determine if a person really is a philosopher. So it is with the author of the profound statement, “Just because you’re paranoid doesn’t mean they aren’t after you”. Philosophical or lyrical, it is the perfect jumping off point for a short series on more obscure conspiracies in American History.  Sure, we have all heard of John Wilks Booth and Lee Harvey Oswald.  Perhaps we have even heard of George Atzerodt, who conspired with Booth to assassinate Lincoln and Johnson however, there are others that will most defiantly leave you a bit slack-jawed if not curious. To begin our series, let’s start with our 16th President and those who colluded to bring about his demise. Booth’s main conspirators, George Atzerodt, David Herold, Lewis Powell and Mary Surratt had their own press coverage, even if they were not quite as infamous as the malicious actor Booth, but reading their confessions and stories can bring this horrific event into clearer focus.  So, hopefully you will enjoy reading these Lincoln Conspiracy issues… and, until next time, remember the wise words of Kurt Cobain and keep looking over your shoulder.

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All Things Nautical… 1773…

October 18, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 
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In our thoroughly modern world, many of us chuckle when we see photos of Bigfoot or The Loch Ness Monster gracing the front of a supermarket tabloid. However, in 1773, Gentleman’s Magazine, a more reputable publisher, featured several seafaring articles including one which stated: “…a most hideous sea monster was seen”. Not to worry, they did balance out this salacious coverage of all things nautical with a more noble seven page article on : “Capt. Wallis’s Voyage round the World”. Pick your passion, sea monsters or great explorers. Both awaken the imagination and draw our interest.

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The October (2021) Newsletter from Rare & Early Newspapers…

October 15, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 
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Monthly Newsletter ~ Rare & Early Newspapers

Welcome to the October, 2021 edition of our monthly newsletter. Hopefully you continue to find collecting/reading historic newspapers as a respite from the ongoing onslaught of troubling news which continues to consume the airwaves. So, in this regard, please enjoy the following:
Newly Added Catalog Items (nearly 50 added this week) – A selection of topics/issues include: President Lincoln formalizing Thanksgiving as a National holiday, Babe Ruth being “purchased” by the Boston Red Sox (in a Boston newspaper), the Maryland “Jew Bill”, Thomas Edison invents the phonograph, Ben Franklin’s “Morals of Chess”, an article/speech related to the extermination of Jews (1936), and more.

 

Twenty-Five Issues Discounted to $10 – Great for gift giving. For what its worth, in our opinion “gifting” one (or more) to yourself is acceptable. 🙂

 

Newly Discounted Newspapers ~ 50% off (through November 11th) – We’ve tried to include topics covering a wide-variety of collecting interests.

 

Did You Know? Did you know many of Walt Whitman’s poems first appeared in the newspapers of his day? We have identified a selection of newspapers which include his poetry at: WALT WHITMAN

 

I thoroughly enjoy historic newspapers and greatly appreciate those who have a similar passion. Thanks for collecting with us!

 

Sincerely,

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team
RareNewspapers.com
570-326-1045

Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers . . .
           . . . History’s Newsstand
“…desiring to conduct ourselves honorably in all things.” Hebrews 13:18b

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Beer and electricity had a common admirer…

October 11, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 
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All of the Founders are worthy of a great deal of respect however, some grab your attention more than others.  From George Washington’s noble bearing to Jefferson’s nation building writing.  I would argue none capture the imagination more than Benjamin Franklin.  Larger than life, with his bifocals and kite in a lightning storm, he makes a great historical figure for kids to study while inspiring adults with his witty wisdom such as, “Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.”

Among the many issues  we have at Rare Newspapers covering Franklin is one which is described as follows:

”The earliest account of the electrical experiments made by Benjamin Franklin, at Philadelphia (where he was then the post-master) appeared anonymously in ‘The Gentleman’s Magazine for January, 1750‘.”

This article mentions several of Franklin’s important discoveries, including: “…that it will live in water…that it is more strongly attracted by slender sharp points than by solid blunt bodies…that bodies replete with this fire strongly attract such as have less of it, and repel such as have an equal quantity…”.

Beer, electricity, bifocals and chess –  take a look at this brilliant, yet quirky Founder with new eyes by reading about him in the papers of his day.

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“Things I Never Knew”… Fredrick Douglass Edition…

October 7, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 
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It’s amazing how one can work intimately with history for years-on-end and still find so much you don’t know – and I’m certainly a case in point.  I find that after 2 years of exploring (technically called working) at RareNewspapers, I am still surprised & delighted on nearly a daily basis.  Just yesterday, as I began to dig into the background of one of America’s heroes, Frederick Douglass, I discovered he had served as U.S. Marshal –  a fact which may have been known to many of the readers of the History’s Newsstand blog, but was new(s) to me:

“When Republican Rutherford B. Hayes was elected president, he named Douglass as United States Marshal for the District of Columbia, the first person of color to be so named. The Senate voted to confirm him on March 17, 1877.[147] Douglass accepted the appointment, which helped assure his family’s financial security.[51] During his tenure, Douglass was urged by his supporters to resign from his commission, since he was never asked to introduce visiting foreign dignitaries to the President, which is one of the usual duties of that post. However, Douglass believed that no covert racism was implied by the omission, and stated that he was always warmly welcomed in presidential circles.” (Wiki)

I love how I get to spend my days!

 

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They put it in print, 1917 – “The more things change…”

October 4, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 
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A recent post focused on a headline which borrowed Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr’s famous words from 1849: “the more things change, the more they stay the same” (translated from “plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose”). This tendency, as applied to human behavior, has certainly been substantiated time and time again in the world of politics.

During former President Trump’s term in office “leaks” were springing up everywhere. For a novice to the political realm this may have appeared to have been a new phenomenon; however, the banner headline from a San Diego Evening Tribune dated January 8, 1917 makes it clear that once again, Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr was spot-on. How do we know? They put it in print:

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Announcing: Catalog #311 (for October, 2021) is now available…

October 1, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 
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http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpg

Catalog 311 (for October) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 350 new items, a selection which includes: the Articles of Confederation, a nice account of Lincoln’s assassination, a graphic issue on the sinking of the Titanic, George Washington is elected President, Winslow Homer’s famous ‘Snap The Whip’, Washington crosses the Delaware, an issue almost entirely devoted to the Lincoln assassination (with a print of Booth), the first newspaper published in Alaska (with Seward’s speech to the citizens of Sitka), an issue with the iconic Uncle Sam print, a Civil War broadside, the famous Hamilton and Burr duel, the creation of the United States Marine Corps, nice content on Lewis & Clark, and more.

 

The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days,

upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.

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Hurricane Season… ALREADY???

September 27, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 
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Each year as the beginning of June rolls around, some of us who live near or have trips to the Eastern Coast of the United States begin to watch the hurricane trackers. By late August through September they are really on our minds as we plan for impact on our homes or vacation destinations.  For Virginia Colonists in 1668, even June would have been too little too late to prepare as Virginia had already been hit by a destructive hurricane which would eventually be covered in the April 13, 1668 issue of THE LONDON GAZETTE. So, for the storm trackers out there who have an interest in the past, accounts of tropical storms through Category 5 monsters often appeared in rare & early newspapers.

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They put it in print, 2003 – “Horses with no names?”

September 23, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 
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Many recognize the names of the most famous racehorses of all time: Seattle Slue,  Man o’ War, American Pharaoh, and Citation to name a few – especially if they were featured in a major Hollywood Movie, but what about their sired offspring? Do we recognize their names? How do we even refer to them? Perhaps “Seattle Slue and his Crew”, “Man o’ War and his War Reenactors”, “American Pharaoh and his Royal Subjects”, and/or “Citation and Prized Awards” would be appropriate? While all of these ideas ended up on the drawing room floor, one did make the cut. Thanks to his jockey’s restaurant, we have “Seabiscuit and his Little Biscuits”. How do we know? In the July 10, 2003 issue of the Los Angeles Times, they put it in print.

While none of Seabiscuit’s foals grew up to become famous in and of themselves, the restaurant he inspired is still in business.

– – – – – – – – –

Update 9/28/2021, compliments of K.W. from Illinois…

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A Thankful Heart from the Mouth of Babes…

September 20, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 
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Sometimes an image perfectly captures an emotion or a moment in time. Sometimes that moment is in the present but sometimes it won’t be noticed for decades. Recently, as I was putting together issues for one of our collectors, I came across an image on the front of a Harper’s Weekly dated January 4, 1902 which was that perfect snapshot. Our culture seems to have gotten murky and a bit hard to decipher at times., but on the front of the photo of a little boy captured the simplicity of his life. He was thankful for a man who had sacrificed greatly to make his life better. Perhaps, as a way to cut through the muck and mire of our time, a thankful heart is just what our culture… what we… what I need.

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