This Month in History – July…

July 8, 2024 by · Leave a Comment 

July was a busy month from a (an) historic perspective. While it has always been a “time for war”, some of the most amazing discoveries, accomplishments, and human advancements have also made their way onto the historic July Calander. While the list is almost endless, three-handfuls include:

  • A French soldier discovers the Rosetta Stone (July 19, 1799)
  • First photographs were used in a newspaper (July 1, 1848)
  • U.S. Congress authorizes the Medal of Honor (July 12, 1862)
  • P.T. Barnum’s Museum burns down (July 13, 1865)
  • Philadelphia Zoo opens, the first zoo in the U.S. (July 1, 1874)
  • President Garfield is shot (July 2, 1881)
  • Louis Pasteur successfully gives first anti-rabies vaccination to nine-year-old (July 6, 1885)
  • The 16th Amendment, the power to tax income, is passed by Congress (July 12, 1909)
  • Albert Einstein introduces his Theory of Relativity (July 1, 1905)
  • “Lady Astor’s Bill” passes lowering UK drinking age to 18 (July 13, 1923)
  • The bikini is showcased for the first time (July 5, 1946)
  • Walt Disney’s Disneyland opens in Anaheim, CA (July 17, 1955)
  • The first moon walk takes place (July 20, 1969)
  • Hank Aaron hits his 755th and last home run (July 20, 1976)
  • First ‘Test Tube Baby’ is born (July 25, 1978)

For those who have interest in exploring the available newspapers at RareNewspapers.com which may contain reports on some of the above, along with a host of other newsworthy articles, a link to the chronological list is shown below. We hope you enjoy your trek.

NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED IN JULY

 

Sometimes you just know what it means – The Spirit of ’76…

July 4, 2024 by · 1 Comment 

Sometimes you hear a word or a phrase and even though you can’t clearly give a written definition, you just have a gut feeling of what it means. Earlier today, when I was looking at a Picture and Magazine section from a Chicago Sunday Tribune, July 4, 1926, I breezed by the caption of the front-page image… The Spirit of ’76. After a moment, I found my mind wasn’t so much thinking of what that phrase meant, but instead, I was struck by the emotions which had been stirred… pride (in a good way as my mother would say), determination & a deep sense of purpose. Wanting to see if the phrase, “The Spirit of ’76” had a clear definition, I went to Wikipedia and found the following…

“The Spirit of ’76 is a sentiment explored by Thomas Jefferson. According to the text published at Monticello, “The principles outlined in the Declaration of Independence promised to lead America—and other nations on the globe—into a new era of freedom. The revolution begun by Americans on July 4, 1776, would never end. It would inspire all peoples living under the burden of oppression and ignorance to open their eyes to the rights of mankind, to overturn the power of tyrants, and to declare the triumph of equality over inequality.”

Thomas Jewett wrote that at the time of the American Revolution, there was “an intangible something that is known as the ‘Spirit of ’76.’ This spirit was personified by the beliefs and actions of that almost mythical group known as the Founding Fathers and is perhaps best exemplified by Thomas Jefferson.”

Jefferson and the Second Continental Congress believed the Spirit of ’76 “included the ‘self-evident’ truths of being ‘created equal’ and being ‘endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights’ including ‘life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.'” ~ Wiki

Hmmmm… “an intangible something”. I would agree this spirit is hard to completely capture with words, but it can certainly be understood with a feeling, a picture, or a flag, and it is certainly a “spirit” we need in abundance today.

Announcing: Catalog #344 for July, 2024 – Rare & Early Newspapers…

June 28, 2024 by · Leave a Comment 

 

The July catalog (#344) is now available. Shown below are links to various segments of the catalog, our currently discounted newspapers, and recent posts to the History’s Newsstand Blog. Please enjoy.

CATALOG #344 – This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 300 new items, a selection which includes the following noteworthy issues: President George Washington’s letter to the Newport synagogue (a landmark issue), the Bill of Rights in a Philadelphia newspaper, the Articles of Confederation, a rare newsbook from 1647, the best San Francisco earthquake issue to be had, a graphic presentation of Lincoln’s assassination, and more.

 

Helpful Links to the Catalog:
————–
DISCOUNTED ISSUES – What remains of last month’s discounted issues may be viewed at: Discount (select items at 50% off) 
————–
Thanks for collecting with us.

 

Sincerely,

 

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team

570-326-1045

[The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days

upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.]

The Power of Music… Classics Never go out of Style!

June 24, 2024 by · Leave a Comment 

Has anyone else noticed how music from the 60’s-90’s has made a huge cultural comeback? From movies to commercials… from concerts to radio, the oldies but goodies are being sung (or at least hummed) by everyone from Boomers to Gen Zers. Music not only soothes the savage beast, it also brings whimsy to a warm summer day and sets the mood for a cozy winter evening. So, it is not surprising that collectors LOVE the concert ads in THE VILLAGE VOICE out of Greenwich Village, NY. Interests range from Bob Dylan, Kiss and The Grateful Dead to Lynyrd Skynyrd and Tiny Tim (with his famous ukulele). This retro music can whisk us away to a memory tucked in the back of our minds and flood us with all the emotions we felt as our younger selves. Almost daily, as I prep these concert ads for our collectors, I am transported to a music memory from long ago and reminded again that newspaper collecting has a sweet spot for everyone.

Inspiration Comes in All Shapes, Sizes & Stories…

June 21, 2024 by · Leave a Comment 

Years ago (36 to be exact), my husband shared with me one of his favorite books of all time: Through Gates of Splendor, by Elizabeth Elliot. For those not familiar with this true story, Elizabeth’s husband and 4 other missionaries were taken and killed by the Auca tribe in Ecuador. Jump forward several decades to yesterday when our newest employee, who is currently enrolled in a missionary aviation, excitedly searched through the archives to find issues regarding this horrible event. To his elation he found several newspapers with real-time (contemporary) coverage. I was delighted to see the love of something which had captured my husband’s fascination as a young man still have the power to inspire a younger generation. This is one of the most satisfying aspects of newspaper collecting; no matter where your passions lie, there’s likely a newspaper with a report, ad, or headline which will relate to it.

Snapshot 1973 – Henry Kissinger – 1st ethnic Jew & 1st naturalized U.S. citizen to become Secretary of State…

June 7, 2024 by · Leave a Comment 

When it comes to politics and ethnicity, gender, religion, etc., U.S. firsts are noteworthy. A few which stand out are John F. Kennedy (1st Roman Catholic President), Barack Obama (1st black President), Kamala Harris (1st female and 1st black Vice-President), Antonin Scalia (1st Italian-American Supreme Court Justice), Hiram Revels (1st former slave to serve as a U.S. Senator), etc. The list of such significant milestones is almost endless.

Although it took place during my lifetime, to my loss one failed to capture the attention of my (then) 14-year-old mind. However, thanks to a collector’s request to see if we had coverage of the tragic death of singer-songwriter Jim Croce, my digging within our archives turned up a September 22, 1973 News and Observer (Raleigh, NC) which not only had a report on his death, but also featured the front-page headline: “KISSINGER CONFIRMED IN 78-7 VOTE” – telling of his becoming both the first Jewish-American AND first naturalized citizen to be confirmed as Secretary of State. He was sworn in the following day. Quite historic. Such “finds” are nearly a daily occurrence in the lives of our Rare & Early Newspapers’ staff – just one more reason to love this collectible!

This Month in History – June…

June 3, 2024 by · Leave a Comment 

Continuing with our series of “This Month in History”, we thought we’d jump right in and provide the link to the available issues which were published during the month of June. This time around we’ve arranged them in chronological order to provide a newspaper version of a walk forward through time – from 1666 to 2022. Enjoy.

NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED IN JUNE

 

Announcing: Catalog #343 for June, 2024 – Rare & Early Newspapers…

May 31, 2024 by · Leave a Comment 

 

The June catalog (#343) is now available. Shown below are links to various segments of the catalog, our currently discounted newspapers, and recent posts to the History’s Newsstand Blog. Please enjoy.

CATALOG #343 – This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 300 new items, a selection which includes the following noteworthy issues: Ben Franklin’s famous “Join Or Die” engraving in the masthead, the Gettysburg Address (on the front page), the House version of the Bill Of Rights, a rare & desired pillar cartoon celebrating ratification, a Chicago newspaper on the Chicago Fire, a British newsbook from 1646, and more.

 

 

Helpful Links to the Catalog:
————–
DISCOUNTED ISSUES – What remains of last month’s discounted issues may be viewed at: Discount (select items at 50% off) 
————–
Thanks for collecting with us.

 

Sincerely,

 

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team

570-326-1045

[The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days

upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.]

Memorial Day (aka, Decoration Day) and the melting pot of grave markers…

May 27, 2024 by · Leave a Comment 

Soon after the Revolutionary War, during the formative years of The United States, the metaphor “Melting Together” was often used to describe the citizenry of this new experiment in self-government. In the early 1900’s this morphed into “Melting Pot” as a result of Israel Zangwill’s famous play of the same name. The breadth of ethnicities which make up our nation can almost be described in Biblical terms – “every ethnos” (people group) – and for much of the past two centuries, although not without hurdles to clear, it has been one of our greatest strengths. However, being in the same pot does not necessitate a “melting together”. It takes hard work. Yet, the effort has proven to be worth it. Of course, our enemies know the reality of both – the strength it brings…. and the effort it takes, and so they seek to foment division from within. Sadly, too many do not see this nefarious manipulation or the writing on the wall if they continue to allow themselves to be a pawn of the tactics used by those who seek to weaken us at the core.

So, what does this have to do with Memorial Day? A few days ago I came across a May 31, 1939 New York Times which contained multiple reports telling of the prior day’s Memorial Day celebrations held throughout the country. What struck me was the “melting together” of citizens from every walk of life as they honored those who had given their very lives to earn, preserve, and protect those from each and every ethnos who comprise the melting pot in which we live. As I pondered which article to feature in conjunction with this post, considering current events, I thought the one below to be apropos. It is interesting to note that this article was written in the midst of perhaps the greatest effort in human history to create a nation based on the antithesis of a melting pot – specifically targeting those hereafter honored:

Happy Memorial Day? Perhaps. Grateful Memorial Day? Absolutely!

The Month of May thru time – as reported in newspapers of the day…

May 10, 2024 by · Leave a Comment 

When considering the month of May what historical events come to mind? I’m sure if we each came up with a list of ten, while there may be some overlap, our lists would be quite diverse. A quick internet search turned up an exhaustive list which included the following:

  • Great Britain was formed from a union between England and Scotland
  • U.S. Special Operations Forces killed Osama bin Laden
  • Decoration Day (now Memorial Day) was first observed in the U.S. (1865)
  • Communism founder Karl Marx (1818-1883) was born in Treves, Germany
  • The German airship Hindenburg burst into flames
  • The British passenger ship Lusitania was torpedoed by a German submarine
  • Nelson Mandela was inaugurated as president of South Africa
  • The first permanent English settlement in America was established at Jamestown, Virginia
  • Napoleon Bonaparte became Emperor of France
  • Mount St. Helens volcano erupted in southwestern Washington State

Collectors of rare and early newspapers know that coverage of such events can nearly always be found in old newspapers; however, one of the added pleasures is discovering reports of previously unknown or long-forgotten events which inspire a deeper look – aiding the lifelong learning process which helps to keep us mentally engaged as we progress through life.

The link below will take you to a reverse-chronological list (1600’s-20th century) of our currently available newspapers from the month of March. There’s no need to buy anything. Simply enjoy your march backwards through time.

NEWSPAPERS PUBLISHED IN MAY

 

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