Sometimes you just know what it means – The Spirit of ’76…

July 4, 2024 by · Leave a Comment 

Sometimes you hear a word or a phrase and even though you can’t clearly give a written definition, you just have a gut feeling of what it means. Earlier today, when I was looking at a Picture and Magazine section from a Chicago Sunday Tribune, July 4, 1926, I breezed by the caption of the front-page image… The Spirit of ’76. After a moment, I found my mind wasn’t so much thinking of what that phrase meant, but instead, I was struck by the emotions which had been stirred… pride (in a good way as my mother would say), determination & a deep sense of purpose. Wanting to see if the phrase, “The Spirit of ’76” had a clear definition, I went to Wikipedia and found the following…

“The Spirit of ’76 is a sentiment explored by Thomas Jefferson. According to the text published at Monticello, “The principles outlined in the Declaration of Independence promised to lead America—and other nations on the globe—into a new era of freedom. The revolution begun by Americans on July 4, 1776, would never end. It would inspire all peoples living under the burden of oppression and ignorance to open their eyes to the rights of mankind, to overturn the power of tyrants, and to declare the triumph of equality over inequality.”

Thomas Jewett wrote that at the time of the American Revolution, there was “an intangible something that is known as the ‘Spirit of ’76.’ This spirit was personified by the beliefs and actions of that almost mythical group known as the Founding Fathers and is perhaps best exemplified by Thomas Jefferson.”

Jefferson and the Second Continental Congress believed the Spirit of ’76 “included the ‘self-evident’ truths of being ‘created equal’ and being ‘endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights’ including ‘life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.'” ~ Wiki

Hmmmm… “an intangible something”. I would agree this spirit is hard to completely capture with words, but it can certainly be understood with a feeling, a picture, or a flag, and it is certainly a “spirit” we need in abundance today.

Capturing the Vibe… Christmas 1903…

December 8, 2023 by · Leave a Comment 

Welcome to the 2nd post in our ongoing series “Capturing the Vibe” where we try to imagine what the world felt like to a newspaper reader from the past by immersing ourselves in their … “vibe of the day”. This month I was drawn to Illustrated Magazines as Christmas is right around the corner, and they usually offer a plethora of wintery images. 1903 was on a low shelf and so it called my name.

So, on we go with this month’s issue…

 

Sometimes the December 1900’s colored covers are Christmas related and sometimes they are just beautiful!

 

Even though the color cover wasn’t Christmassy, the inside cover was full of Winter spirit.

 

On a somber note, I found a fascinating article comparing Feast-days with Fast-days …  not something you hear in conversations of our days.

 

 

On a somewhat lighter note, I saw a multiple cell comic strip on “Pledges of Purity for the New Year”.

 

 

 

There was an article and intricate image of the New Williamsburg Bridge Christening in New York City…

 

 

 

A story by Robert Chambers…

 

and finally, a political Santa cartoon by W.A. Rogers who took over for Thomas Nast when he left Harper’s Weekly.

 

 

I count this find as an issue full of Christmas gifts!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Illustrated London News… Beautiful imagery…

September 16, 2022 by · Leave a Comment 

Today, as I was searching for an issue for a collector, I was paging through an 1857 issue of The Illustrated London News.  In the midst of all of the intricate black and white sketches I happened upon two full-color double page portraits of what I believed to be women’s fashion of the day… one titled “Town” and the other titled “Country”. Of course, my immediate thought went to the popular American magazine which began in the 1800’s.  However, upon a bit of investigating, I found that the current Town and Country Magazine had a predecessor two hundred years prior to its inception (some of which we have sold). This English version which began in the 1760’s is described as follows by Wikipedia:

“Town and Country Magazine was an 18th-century London-based publication that featured tales of scandals and affairs between members of London’s upper classes. Town and Country Magazine was founded by Archibald Hamilton in 1769. It gained the name ‘Town and Country’ because Hamilton had two offices, one in urban Clerkenwell and one in a rural area near Highgate. In the 1770s there was a dramatic increase in suits brought by men and their wives’ lovers in England. Many people became eager to read transcripts of adultery trials…”.

Yikes!  After reading this, I am no longer sure what I found was describing women’s fashion.

I Would Love to Have Them All…

April 22, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

As you can imagine, working here at the RareNewspapers office can be a bit like a kid working in a candy shop.  Almost daily I push the thought, “Maybe I should buy this one for myself”, to the back of my mind. Sometimes it is because of the historic impact of the content I am seeing and the deep desire to personally protect it for posterity.  Sometimes it is because the issue triggers a fond memory and whisks me away to another day.  Last week this thought would not stay in the back of my mind but continued to crash to the forefront over and over.  Finally, with my many rationalizations in hand, I pulled out my credit card and purchased the issue.  Feelings of nostalgia of a simpler by gone era washed over me as I paged through my new treasure.  This treasure is mine however, if you are ever drawn to that same simpler time, we here at the RareNewspapers office have other options for you to consider.  There is truly something for everyone.  I may have been drawn to the vintage ads, drawings, paper dolls and old stories, but there is so much more.  Take a moment to step back in time.  Sometimes those brief moments are all that are needed to add a bit of perspective to the “thoroughly modern” life we currently live.

“A Picture Paints a Thousand Words” rings true in the world of newspaper collecting…

March 22, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

When discussing advertising in 1921, Fred R. Barnard coined the phrase: “A picture paints a 1000 words” (often modified to read: “A picture is worth a 1000 words”. Perhaps he copied a bit from the Chinese Proverb: “Hearing something a hundred times isn’t better than seeing it once” however, it is no less true concerning the written word as it is true of the spoken word. The images our brains receive immediately elicit an emotional response which can range from horror, to delight, from sadness to warmth and security.

This truth is no more prevalent than in the world of newspapers. Daily, here at the RareNewspapers office, our work is arrested for moments as we pause to appreciate those pictures that speak the loudest. Here is a link to our website that will take you to issues we define as “displayable”. Some of these are beautiful color images that bring a deep sense of nostalgia, some are a simple masthead that will amaze you with it’s intricacies. Some images are snapshots of a tragic time when people were called upon to rise up and show the best side of humanity. If you choose to spend a few moments walking this path of images, I think you will appreciate their power in our lives to shape both a nation and each individual.

The Battle of Los Angeles…

March 14, 2014 by · 2 Comments 

The Los Angeles Times–Extra” of February 24, 1942 has one of the more dramatic, screaming headlines to be found in any newspaper: “L.A. AREA RAIDED ! ” with a smaller head noting: “Jap Planes Peril Santa Monica, Seal Beach, El Segundo, Redondo, Long Beach, Hermosa, Signal Hill”. The report begins: “Roaring out of a brilliant moonlit western sky, foreign aircraft flying both in large formation and single, few over Southern California early today and drew heavy barrages of anti-aircraft fire–the first ever to sound over United States continental soil against an enemy invader…” (see).

The Battle of Los Angeles, also known as The Great Los Angeles Air Raid, is the name given to this rumored enemy attack and subsequent anti-aircraft artillery barrage which took place from late February 24 to early February 25, 1942 over Los Angeles. The incident occurred less than three months after the United States entered World War II as a result of the Japanese Imperial Navy’s attack on Pearl Harbor.

Initially, the target of the aerial barrage was thought to be an attacking force from Japan, but speaking at a press conference shortly afterward, Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox called the incident a “false alarm.” Newspapers of the time published a number of reports and speculations of a cover-up. Some modern-day UFOlogists have suggested the targets were extraterrestrial spacecraft. When documenting the incident in 1983, the U.S. Office of Air Force History attributed the event to a case of “war nerves” likely triggered by a lost weather balloon and exacerbated by stray flares and shell bursts from adjoining batteries.

Air raid sirens sounded throughout Los Angeles County on the night of February 24-25, 1942. A total blackout was ordered and thousands of air raid wardens were summoned to their positions. At 3:16 am the 37th Coast Artillery Brigade began firing .50 caliber machine guns and 12.8-pound anti-aircraft shells into the air at reported aircraft; over 1,400 shells would eventually be fired. Pilots of the 4th Interceptor Command were alerted but their aircraft remained grounded. The artillery fire continued sporadically until 4:14 am. The “all clear” was sounded and the blackout order lifted at 7:21 am.

Several buildings and vehicles damaged by shell fragments, and five civilians died as an indirect result of the anti-aircraft fire, three of them killed in car accidents in the ensuing chaos and two of heart attacks attributed to the stress of the hour-long action. The incident was front-page news along the U.S. Pacific coast, and earned some mass media coverage throughout the nation.(credit to Wikipedia)

Curious juncture of image, date, and event…

April 14, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

The “Sunday Magazine” issue of the Detroit News Tribune, April 14, 1912 offers a curious juxtaposition of date, image, and event (see below). The color print on the cover shows a woman waving from what would appear to be the deck of a ship. This also happens to be the very day the Titanic stuck the iceberg, which would go down in history as one of the more tragic maritime disasters of all time.

At times cover prints or content within newspapers offer some interesting collectibles, even when the the relevance could not have been known when published.