July thru time (50, 100, 150, 200, & 250 years ago) – 2018 edition…

July 23, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

What news was reported in the month of July – 50 (1958), 100 (1918), 150 (1868), 200 (1818), and 250 (1768) years ago? Such a walk back through time via the eyes of those who read the daily and weekly newspapers of the period can be quite revealing. This is why we often say, “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.” The following links will take you back in time to show the available newspapers from the Rare & Early newspapers website. There’s no need to buy a thing. Simply enjoy the stroll.
July:
1968 – 50 years ago
1918 – 100 years ago
1868 – 150 years ago
1818 – 200 years ago
1768 – 250 years ago
Wanting for more? Why not take a year-long gander at 1668, 1718, 1768, 1818, 1868, 1918, and/or 1968?

Israeli Statehood – You can learn something new every day…

July 9, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Which major power was the first to recognize the Statehood of Israel? Perhaps it was my arrogance, naivety, or a blend of both which led me to believe the United States would hold this position, but the err in my thinking was brought to light as I read a front page article in The Raleigh Times (May 18, 1948), which revealed that although the U.S. was the first to do so vocally, the first country to formally recognize Israeli Statehood was Russia. As a matter of fact, Venezuela, Romania, France, and a host of other countries formalized their recognition before the United States, who didn’t do so formally until the end of January – nearly 9 months later. If this were the Olympics, the United States, holding the 20th position, would be in the stands watching Russia, the Czech Republic, and Nicaragua receive their medals on the victor’s stand.

Announcing: Catalog #272 (for July, 2018) is now available…

June 29, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpgRare Newspapers’ monthly offering of collectible newspapers, Catalog 272, is now available. This latest collection of authentic newspapers is comprised of nearly 350 new items. Some of the noteworthy content includes: a great set from Washington on the Dred Scott Decision, a London newspaper on the coronation of the king and queen, the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre, the first issue after printing the Declaration of Independence (from Philadelphia!), the Battle of Gettysburg (from close to the battlefield), a splendid map of America from 1763, and more.

To view the above key issues and a whole lot more, go to: Catalog 272

(The catalog links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

Taking a stand… often at a cost…

June 25, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

What do Michael Jones, Sandy Koufax, Eric Liddell, and Hakeem Olajuwon all have in common? They are all major athletes who made professional sacrifices due to their faith. In some cases the sacrifices made had only a minimal cost, but in others the cost was quite significant. This reality was recently brought to our attention through the eyes of a Detroit News from October 3, 1965. It tells of Sandy Koufax not being available to start the 1st game of the World Series due to his observance of Yom Kipper. Although the article states it really wasn’t a big deal, his missing the first game would mean he would not be available to pitch 3 times if the series took 7 games, unless he pitched with only 2 days rest – rarely a successful venture. After his team lost the first two games of the series, it sure appeared as if his decision would prove quite costly. However, in the end, he did pitch game 7 on only 2 days rest – won the game, and was named the Series MVP. However, what if they had lost? What about others who’s teams have lost or they themselves were excluded from major events due to their faith? Do you think many ever regret their decision to put their faith first? I’m guessing no, but perhaps others know otherwise.

Innocence… Flag Day 1921

June 14, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

One of the understated, yet profound beauties of the American experiment is self-government is not that everything is perfect; rather, its the built in mechanisms which enable peaceful positive change over time. At time the wheels of progress move all-too-slowly, but they move. The presence of political and social tension are not signs of weakness, but are part and parcel of how we function in a (hopefully) civil, free society. For most the flag represents not perfection – but the ideals which provide avenues for change. It is with these thoughts in mind in the face of current tensions that I was struck by the innocence of the moment captured on the front page of The Omaha Sunday Bee’s Rotogravure Section for June 12, 1921. Something about it seems pure and right. Whether you agree, or agree to disagree, perhaps a day will come when our children, or our children’s children, will pay the ultimate sacrifice to protect our right to do so. Happy Flag Day!

Anticipation enhanced by delayed gratification… King Tut…

June 11, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

A bride-to-be as her wedding day approaches… a young child the night before Christmas… a family as it heads off towards a long-awaited vacation destination (Can anyone hear, “Are we there yet?”)… a teacher during the last week of May – as the end of the year nudges closer… a groom as his wedding night draws near – there is no doubt that delayed gratification buoyed by a humongous helping of perseverance tends to make long anticipated events taste even sweeter. Such was to be the case for Howard Carter (archeologist – backed by financier George Herbert) as he entered the newly discovered tomb in late November of 1922 to find drawings related to the funeral of King Tutankhamun painted on the walls. After more than a decade of searching – failure built upon failure, could this be it? While newspapers would not report the opening of the inner tomb until February the following year, the front page of The New York Times from December 1, 1922 had the announcement of Carter’s initial find – with mention of the King Tut related drawings. One can only imagine the escalation in excitement this created – and the building of anticipation which occurred over the next few months. Unlike the opening of Al Capone’s vaults in 1986, this find would not disappoint!

June thru time (50, 100, 150, 200, & 250 years ago) – 2018 edition…

June 7, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

What news was reported in the month of June – 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 years ago (1968, 1918, 1868, 1818, 1768)? Such a walk back through time via the eyes of those who read the daily and weekly newspapers of the period can be quite revealing. This is why we often say, “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.” The following links will take you back in time to show the available newspapers from the Rare & Early newspapers website. There’s no need to buy a thing. Simply enjoy the stroll.
June:
1968 – 50 years ago
1918 – 100 years ago
1868 – 150 years ago
1818 – 200 years ago
1768 – 250 years ago
Wanting for more? Why not take a year-long gander at 1668, 1718, 1768, 1818, 1868, 1918, and/or 1968?

Announcing: Catalog #271 (for June, 2018) is now available…

June 1, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpgRare Newspapers’ monthly offering of collectible newspapers, Catalog 271, is now available. This latest collection of authentic newspapers is comprised of nearly 350 new items. Some of the noteworthy content includes: an issue of the American Weekly Mercury (1735), a first report of George Washington’s death, Lee surrenders to Grant at Appomattox, Battle of Bennington (1778), Babe Ruth is sold to the Yankees, the Hindenburg explodes, and more.

To view the above key issues and a whole lot more, go to: Catalog 271

(The catalog links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

The Traveler… great disaster in Oakdale…

May 21, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

A few days ago I journeyed to New York City by way of The New York Times of May 19, 1918 where I found that first reporting of the terrible disaster in Oakdale, Pennsylvania. “Probably 200 men were killed today when an explosion of TNT demolished the plant of the Aetna Chemical Company, at Oakdale, on the Panhandle Division of The Pennsylvania Railroad… The 500 workmen in the plant were startled at noon by a report not much louder than the crack of a pistol. It came from the soda house. The men knew its deadly import, and as one they rushed for the nearest exit. Before they could gain the open the very air seemed to burst into flames, the earth heaved and rocked, and, with a roar that was heard for miles, the long factory buildings were hurled high into the air, carrying with them ponderous equipment and scores of men…”

More explosions followed with many lives lost, some men were never found or identified.

~The Traveler

Great Headlines Speak For Themselves… O.J. Simpson not guilty…

May 14, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

The best headlines need no commentary. Such is the case with the LOS ANGELES TIMES, EXTRA, California, October 3, 1995: “Simpson Not Guilty, He Is Freed After 15 Months in Jail”

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