Victor Hugo – poetry in early 19th century Gentleman’s Magazines…

June 29, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

In our opinion, one of the early titles we come across, The Gentleman’s Magazine, is grossly underappreciated. This London “Reader’s Digest-sized” publication which spanned the early 18th through mid-19th centuries and was known for great reporting from throughout the world, was also pregnant with book reviews, poetry, mathematical challenges, birth and death notices, and an abundance of plates depicting everything from maps to sketches of rare animals, historical cathedrals, and notable men and women of the era. While we’ve written about this title in previous posts (view posts), our attention this time around is in regards to poetry – with a question.

Whereas nearly every issue contains poetry of the period, the poets are often unknown to me, and therefore, rarely catch my eye. However, during the process of scanning The Gentleman’s magazine for July, 1833 looking for content related to the Slavery Abolition Act of 1833, one name in the heading of a poem caught my eye: Victor Hugo. After reading the poem – and being moved, I became curious as to whether this was an early (1st???) printing – and therefore more valuable as a collectible, or if he had penned it many years prior. Unfortunately a cursory on-line investigation came up empty in regards to a validation that the poem was even written by him, let alone its original date of publication. Of course this begs the question: Can anyone attribute this to him and/or confirm its first printing? If anyone is in the know, please share your knowledge with the collectible community. Thanks in advance. AND as for the poem itself:

Are Presidential proclamations for thanksgiving and prayer unconstitutional?

June 26, 2017 by · 2 Comments 

Over the years we have written multiple posts featuring noteworthy Presidential proclamations for days of thanksgiving, humiliation, and prayer, and have listed quite a few on the Rare & Early Newspapers website. Not too long ago we came across an issue of The Boston Investigator for November 10, 1880 which contained an article focused on a view that such proclamations are/were unconstitutional. So, although we passionately disagree with this opinion, in an effort to be fair and balanced, we present the article below. Feel free to respond with your thoughts.

It’s amazing what one often finds buried in old newspapers…

June 22, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Flowers, leaves, photos, clumps of hair, historic trinkets… The list of what might be found buried within and among the inside pages of historic newspapers continues to foster our love for the collectible. The latest discovery? As we were scanning a September 22, 1880 issue of The Boston Investigator hoping to find a mention of Thomas Edison (which turned out to be successful), we noticed an article titled: “Strange Tribe Of Jews Discovered In The Caucasus”, which turned out to be quite interesting:

A June, 2017 stroll back thru time – 50, 100, 150, 200, & 250 years ago…

June 12, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

What news was reported in the month of June, exactly 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 years ago (1967, 1917, 1867, 1817, 1767)? Such a walk back through time via the eyes of those who read the daily and weekly newspapers of the period can be quite revealing. This is why we often say, “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.” The following links will take you back in time to show the available newspapers from the Rare & Early newspapers website. There’s no need to buy a thing. Simply enjoy the stroll.
June:
1967 – 50 years ago
1917 – 100 years ago
1867 – 150 years ago
1817 – 200 years ago
1767 – 250 years ago
Wanting for more? Why not take a year-long gander at 1667, 1717, 1767, 1817, 1867, 1917, and/or 1967?

Announcing: Catalog #259 (for June, 2017) is now available…

June 1, 2017 by · 2 Comments 

Rare Newspapers’ monthly offering of collectible newspapers, Catalog 259, is now available. This latest collection of authentic newspapers is comprised of nearly 350 new items. Some of the noteworthy content includes:

• Anti-slavery periodical by Frederick Douglass
• Treaty of peace ending the Revolutionary War
• Perhaps the best issue on the end of the Civil War
• Historic printing of the Star Spangled Banner
• Graphic issue on the Lincoln assassination
• Perhaps the finest baseball print in a periodical

To view the above key issues and a whole lot more, go to: Catalog 259

(The catalog links shown above will redirect to the latest catalog in approximately 30 days.)

Talk about frustrating!!!

May 11, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

As I was contemplating the abundance of critical issues facing our nation, you can imagine my frustration when I picked up a newspaper and found the following article buried on an inside page:

Seriously? AND the most frustrating thing of all…

The article was found inside the Findlay Daily Jeffersonian dated December 21, 1880. I agree with the mantra, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” However, what if it is broke?

Announcing: Catalog #258 – for May, 2017 – is now available…

May 4, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Rare Newspapers’ monthly offering of collectible newspapers, Catalog 258, is now available. This latest collection of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 350 new items. Some of the noteworthy content includes:

• John Peter Zenger’s famous New York Weekly Journal dated 1734
• The famous “Dewey Defeats Truman” headline
• Cornwallis surrenders at Yorktown
• Rare “View of Boston” plate from 1787
• Washington proclaims an end to the Revolutionary War
• New Jersey’s first newspaper (from 1780)

To view the above key issues and a whole lot more, go to: Catalog 258

(This catalog link shown above will expire in approximately 30 days.)

A May, 2017 stroll back thru time – 50, 100, 150, 200, & 250 years ago…

May 1, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

What news was reported in the month of May – 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 years ago (1967, 1917, 1867, 1817, 1767)? Such a walk back through time via the eyes of those who read the daily and weekly newspapers of the period can be quite revealing. This is why we often say, “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.” The following links will take you back in time to show the available newspapers from the Rare & Early newspapers website. There’s no need to buy a thing. Simply enjoy the stroll.
May:
1967 – 50 years ago
1917 – 100 years ago
1867 – 150 years ago
1817 – 200 years ago
1767 – 250 years ago
Wanting for more? Why not take a year-long gander at 1667, 1717, 1767, 1817, 1867, 1917, and/or 1967?

I absolutely love this hobby! Ivanhoe…

April 29, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

One of the greatest pleasures of the Rare & Early Newspapers collectible is finding unexpected hidden gems as we peruse our issues. I use the word “unexpected” because, unlike searching for treasure, many of the most noteworthy discoveries are those found “along the way” – not items for which we were hunting. Such is the case with our most recent find: One of the first-ever reviews of Ivanhoe, by Sir Walter Scott. The front page of the Rhode-Island American dated March 3, 1820 has a review which gives a glimpse into how this 1820’s classic was received during its first year of publication.

To read the entire review, go to: Ivanhoe, by Sir Walter Scott

The Traveler… up from the ashes…

April 17, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Today I traveled to New York City by the way of the Harper’s Weekly dated April 20, 1867. In the issue I found the reporting of the “Burning of the Lindell Hotel, at Saint Louis, Missouri, blog-4-17-2017-lindell-hotel-fireMarch 30, 1867″. “…The Lindell is admitted to have been the largest building for purposes of accommodation ever erected in America. It was six stories high exclusive of attic and basement; and was divided into the five hundred and thirty rooms, and the largest of which was 116 by 44 feet. The actual cost of the building was $950,000, which, with the ground (valued at $326,400), makes the whole value $1, 276,400 — note to speak of furniture, $500,000 worth or which was imported… The efforts of the firemen were not relaxed, though it was evident that they would prove futile; the full force of the Department was steadily at work until 3 o’clock on the morning of March 31, at which time all the inner work was consume, and a considerable portion of the walls had fallen in, and the once imposing hotel was a mass of crumbling, blackened ruins.”

Almost immediately, the citizens of Lindell began assembling to discuss the rebuilding of the hotel. New construction began in September of 1872 with the opening in September of 1874.

~The Traveler

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