Announcing: Catalog #275 (for October, 2018) is now available…

October 1, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

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Catalog 275 (for October) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of over 300 new items, a selection which includes: perhaps the best stock market crash newspaper, the iconic “Dewy Defeats Truman” newspaper, the Gettysburg Address (from the nation’s capital), a great map of America from 1776, Lincoln’s inauguration and inaugural address, a front page report of Washington’s death, and more. Another special item was added after the catalog went to print, and therefore, is only being offered online:  The Virginia Gazette from 1774 which includes reflective thoughts on the Boston Massacre (extremely rare).
The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

                1500-1799 (full view OR quick-scan/compact view)  

                1800-1899 (full view OR quick-scan/compact” view)

                1900-2015 (full view OR quick-scan/compact” view)

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

(The catalog links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

A tad bit premature… The Traveler…

September 20, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

A few days ago my journey took me to New York City by the way of the New York Spectator dated September 15, 1818. It is there I found the announcement “Death of Col. Daniel Boon (Boone),” which included in part: “As he lived so he died, with his gun in his hand… rode to a deer-lick, seated himself within a blind raised to conceal him.. while setting thus concealed… without pain, he breathed out his last so gently, that when he found next day by this friends… he looked as if alive…”

Hmmm, maybe he truly was still alive as he did not die until two years later on September 26, 1820!

~The Traveler

September thru time (50, 100, 150, 200, & 250 years ago) – 2018 edition…

September 7, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

What news was reported in the month of September – 50 (1958), 100 (1918), 150 (1868), 200 (1818), and 250 (1768) years ago? Such a walk back through time via the eyes of those who read the daily and weekly newspapers of the period can be quite revealing. This is why we often say, “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.” The following links will take you back in time to show the available newspapers from the Rare & Early newspapers website. There’s no need to buy a thing. Simply enjoy the stroll.
September:
1968 – 50 years ago
1918 – 100 years ago
1868 – 150 years ago
1818 – 200 years ago
1768 – 250 years ago
Wanting for more? Why not take a year-long gander at 1668, 1718, 1768, 1818, 1868, 1918, and/or 1968?

Announcing: Catalog #274 (for September, 2018) is now available…

August 31, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

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Catalog 274 (for September) is now available. Due to an influx of new inventory, this is likely one of our best catalogs in quite some time. There are too many great issues to highlight, but a sampling includes: a German newsbook dated 1607, a Richmond broadside on the Battle of Gettysburg, the Inauguration & death of W.H. Harrison in a Washington newspaper, a defining moment for the “hippie” generation, the Battle of the Alamo, a great Statue of Liberty foldout, and more. The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

                1500-1799 (full view OR quick-scan/compact view)  

                1800-1899 (full view OR quick-scan/compact” view)

                1900-2015 (full view OR quick-scan/compact” view)

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

(The catalog links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

Nobody like me, everybody hates me… 1863…

August 27, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Nobody likes me, everybody hates me
I think I’ll go eat worms!
Big fat juicy ones
Eensie weensy squeensy ones
See how they wiggle and squirm!

Down goes the first one, down goes the second one
Oh how they wiggle and squirm!
Up comes the first one, up comes the second one
Oh how they wiggle and squirm!

I bite off the heads, and suck out the juice
And throw the skins away!
Nobody knows how fat I grow
On worms three times a day!

Nobody likes me, everybody hates me
I think I’ll go eat worms!
Big fat juicy ones
Eensie weensy squeensy ones
See how they wiggle and squirm!

When a child sings, “Nobody Likes Me,” rarely does it inspire the reaction (from those within listening distance) hoped for. The reality is, they child may be down in the mouth, but they’re likely not going to eat worms. After all, who would do such a thing? Of course we forget times throughout history when many have chosen to do so as a result of severe famine, long sea voyages (where food was scarce – and refrigeration was limited), and of course, in the present as a means of what we often call entertainment on a plethora of reality television shows. speaking of the latter, when such is put upon others against their will, the result is no laughing (or entertaining) matter. Perhaps it is the contrast between a willing act and one which is unjustly perpetrated upon others which drew my attention to the following article found in the New York Daily Tribune, September 3, 1863:

PS Please don’t respond with comments stating this post was in bad taste.

 

Who’s Who in Newspapers? Karl Marx edition…

August 23, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

The 6th installment of Who’s Who in Newspapers:

George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton… Babe Ruth, Jesse Owens, Vince Lombardi… John Wayne, James Dean, Katharine Hepburn – these individuals, among many, are easily recognizable. However, there are quite a few historical figures who, while having adorned the pages of many a newspaper, are far from household names, or, if they are, their connection with historic newspapers might be a bit of a surprise. Such is the case with Karl Marx. While his name is well-known, few are aware he was a foreign correspondent for the New York Tribune before his name became synonymous with socialism and communism.

Feel free to peruse the following chronological list of newspapers to explore his articles, and a few others which were written about him:

KARL MARX

Snapshot 1864… Washington and Lincoln for President…

August 20, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

The following snapshot comes from the New York Tribune, November 11, 1864…

 

August thru time (50, 100, 150, 200, & 250 years ago) – 2018 edition…

August 9, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

What news was reported in the month of August – 50 (1958), 100 (1918), 150 (1868), 200 (1818), and 250 (1768) years ago? Such a walk back through time via the eyes of those who read the daily and weekly newspapers of the period can be quite revealing. This is why we often say, “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.” The following links will take you back in time to show the available newspapers from the Rare & Early newspapers website. There’s no need to buy a thing. Simply enjoy the stroll.
August:
1968 – 50 years ago
1918 – 100 years ago
1868 – 150 years ago
1818 – 200 years ago
1768 – 250 years ago
Wanting for more? Why not take a year-long gander at 1668, 1718, 1768, 1818, 1868, 1918, and/or 1968?

Announcing: Catalog #273 (for August, 2018) is now available…

August 2, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpg

Catalog 273 (for August) is now available. Due to an influx of new inventory, this is likely one of our best catalogs in quite some time. There are too many great issues to highlight, but a sampling includes: the famous “Unite or Die” segmented snake engraving, the Declaration of Independence, an Oxford Gazette w/ mention of an American colony, a report on the Earps in the Tombstone Epitaph, the Gettysburg Address in a military newspaper, Lincoln’s assassination in a Washington newspaper, and more. The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

        1500-1799 (full view OR quick-scan/compact view)
        1800-1899 (full view OR quick-scan/compact” view)
        1900-2015 (full view OR quick-scan/compact” view)

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

(The catalog links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

The Traveler… the Ku Klux Klan… Their first “recorded” assassination…

July 26, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

A little over a month ago I journeyed to Wilmington, North Carolina, by the way of the Daily Journal dated June 17, 1868. There I found the headline “The Georgia Military Outrage.” “On the night of the 30th of March, G. W. Ashburn was killed in a negro house of ill-fame, in the city of Columbus, Georgia… One Bennett, who had been an active Radical partisan, a prominent member of the ‘loyal league,’ was in the house at the time of the killing… Sometime after the killing, and after the military Governor of Georgia had offered an unusually large reward for the apprehension of the murderers, several of the most prominent and respectable young gentlemen of Columbus were arrested by military authority, together with two negroes… When the matter of the arrests was brought to the attention of Congress and the country by Hon. Mr. Beck… now confined in the military barracks at Atlanta, awaiting trial… “

Considered a scalawag by his white Columbus neighbors, he worked with the Freedmens Bureau and alongside African American leaders such as Henry McNeal Turner. His actions quickly created several enemies across the South. Ashburn lived amongst the African American population and garnered attention from the Ku Klux Klan, which established their Columbus chapter on March 21, 1868 after a visit from Nathan Bedford Forrest. Henry Benning testified that Mr. Ashburn had “quit his wife and took up with a negro woman in Columbus.” The trial, beginning on June 29, gained national attention as over twenty persons were arrested and held at Fort McPherson. The prisoners consisted mostly of prominent white residents of Columbus. General Henry L. Benning and former Confederate Vice President Alexander Stephens agreed to represent the accused. The Federal government was pushing for Georgia to ratify the Fourteenth Amendment, while the Georgia legislature was resisting it. The defenders of the KKK saw here an opportunity for a bargain. On July 21, as the trial progressed, Georgia agreed to ratify the 14th Amendment in exchange for General Meade’s termination of the prosecution of the murder. All prisoners made bail and returned to Columbus. No one was ever prosecuted. [source: Wikipedia]

~The Traveler

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