The Traveler… impeachment begins…

March 5, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Today’s journeys took me to Madison, Wisconsin, by the means of the Wisconsin State Journal dated March 6, 1868.  There I found the headline “IMPEACHMENT.” “Opening of the High Court of Impeachment by Chief Justice Chase.” “… At 1 o’clock precisely, Chief Justice Chase appeared at the door of the Senate Chamber, …Acting Vice President Wade then said: ‘The Senate will suspend business for the purpose of proceeding to the consideration of the impeachment of the president of the United States.’ … The Chief Justice said: ‘I am here for the purpose of joining with you in forming a Court for the Court of Impeachment. I am now ready to take the usual oath to the Chief Justice…”

This was the opening day for the three month long impeachment trial of President Andrew Johnson.

~The Traveler

Announcing: Catalog #268 (for March, 2018) is now available…

March 1, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpgRare Newspapers’ monthly offering of collectible newspapers, Catalog 268, is now available. This latest collection of authentic newspapers is comprised of nearly 350 new items. Some of the noteworthy content includes: the desired New York Times reporting Lincoln’s assassination, Causes & Necessity of Taking Up Arms, Winslow Homer’s famous ‘Snap The Whip”, Battle of Lexington & Concord, a great 1757 map of the French & Indian War, the Battle of the Alamo, and more.

To view the above key issues and a whole lot more, go to: Catalog 268

(The catalog links shown above will redirect to the latest catalog in approximately 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

February thru time (50, 100, 150, 200, & 250 years ago) – 2018 edition…

February 5, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

What news was reported in the month of February – 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 years ago (1968, 1918, 1868, 1818, 1768)? Such a walk back through time via the eyes of those who read the daily and weekly newspapers of the period can be quite revealing. This is why we often say, “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.” The following links will take you back in time to show the available newspapers from the Rare & Early newspapers website. There’s no need to buy a thing. Simply enjoy the stroll.
February:
1968 – 50 years ago
1918 – 100 years ago
1868 – 150 years ago
1818 – 200 years ago
1768 – 250 years ago
Wanting for more? Why not take a year-long gander at 1668, 1718, 1768, 1818, 1868, 1918, and/or 1968?

Announcing: Catalog #267 (for February, 2018) is now available…

February 1, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpgRare Newspapers’ monthly offering of collectible newspapers, Catalog 267, is now available. This latest collection of authentic newspapers is comprised of nearly 350 new items. Some of the noteworthy content includes:

• The Articles of Confederation (on the front page)
• 1787 printing of the Constitution of the United States
• Terrific & very detailed 1740 map of the Caribbean
• The Gettysburg Address
• Period mention of the Great Fire of London
• Pennsylvania Gazette with the Ben Franklin imprint

To view the above key issues and a whole lot more, go to: Catalog 267

(The catalog links shown above will redirect to the latest catalog in approximately 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

“The Times They Are A-Changin'”… Martha’s Vineyard… 1867

January 22, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Elkman at en.wikipedia

We recently came across a front page article in a Springfield Republican dated August 21, 1867 which caught our attention. Under the front page heading: “From Martha’s Vineyard,” appears considerable details regarding Wesleyan Grove (Wesleyan Camp Grove), with the subheading: “The World at a Camp-Meeting – The Sound, Its History and Associations,” followed by considerable detail. One might find it interesting to read the article (through the link above), and then dig a little deeper at Wesley Grove. While some elements of the Camp Meeting have undergone dramatic change over time, some things still remain the same. Please enjoy.

Life-perspective from 50, 100, 150+ years ago – 2018 edition…

January 8, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

What news was reported in the month of January – 50, 100, 150, 200, and 250 years ago (1968, 1918, 1868, 1818, 1768)? Such a walk back through time via the eyes of those who read the daily and weekly newspapers of the period can be quite revealing. This is why we often say, “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.” The following links will take you back in time to show the available newspapers from the Rare & Early newspapers website. There’s no need to buy a thing. Simply enjoy the stroll.
January:
1968 – 50 years ago
1918 – 100 years ago
1868 – 150 years ago
1818 – 200 years ago
1768 – 250 years ago
Wanting for more? Why not take a year-long gander at 1668, 1718, 1768, 1818, 1868, 1918, and/or 1968?

Announcing: Catalog #266 (for January, 2018) is now available…

January 4, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpgRare Newspapers’ monthly offering of collectible newspapers, Catalog 266, is now available. This latest collection of authentic newspapers is comprised of nearly 350 new items. Some of the noteworthy content includes:

the Battle of Bunker Hill
a rare issue of the “Pennsylvania Magazine” from 1775
the Gettysburg Address on the front page
the first magazine printing of the Star Spangled Banner
a North Carolina issue on the North Carolina secession
the Great Fire of London in a London newspaper (front page)

To view the above key issues and a whole lot more, go to: Catalog 266

(The catalog links shown above will redirect to the latest catalog in approximately 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

Sometimes it’s what’s missing that catches the eye… Alaska…

December 28, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

One of the greatest hobby-related pleasures experienced by those who collect rare and early newspapers is finding previously unidentified content within an issue. While not on the same scale as finding gold, “mining” a newspaper for reports that were missed by the seller is certainly rewarding. Time and time again collectors tell us they purchased a newspaper for under $30 for a relatively minor report only to find a hidden gem buried deeper within the issue. Such discoveries, at times, can be financially rewarding, but in a world where the unexpected is often tethered to bad news, such relatively common incidents in the newspaper collecting hobby are a sweet salve to the weary soul (okay – perhaps a little overstated). Still, it certainly is to a seller’s advantage to keep such incidents to a minimum. Prior to offering a newspaper for sale, we compare it to various historical databases and our 40+ year chronological record of findings to help us estimate when a report of historical significance might be found. Since news traveled a bit more slowly in previous centuries, even our best intentions are left wanting.

This being said, there are times when, as we go through the process of searching for historical content, what surprises us most is what we are unable to find – or the minimal coverage which is present. Its not that we miss the coverage, rather, its that what we now see as noteworthy events – often buoyed up by movies, history books, etc., were mere blips on the screen at the time they occurred, and the contemporary coverage only serves to confirm its position in the coverage food-chain of the day.

The purchase of Alaska from Russia, finalized on March 30, 1867, is such an event. After spending over an hour searching for a mention in a set of Springfield (MA) Republicans from 1867, coverage finally showed up on page five of the April 10th issue (see image). Perhaps this is why the purchase, promoted heavily by and signed by the U.S. Secretary of State at the time, William H. Seward, became known as “Seward’s Folly.” Of course just because many of his contemporaries thought paying 2 cents an acre was foolish doesn’t mean he was wrong. Sometimes the masses simply don’t get it right – as time would reveal.

 

 

Christmas Day… Not what one might expect…

December 24, 2017 by · 1 Comment 

Over the years we have written various Christmas-themed posts for the 25th (or 24th) of December. Many of these (and a few extras) may be viewed at Christmas-Themed Posts. However, almost by accident, as I was preparing for this year I happened to notice that the “reason for the season” and what has appeared on the pages of many newspapers published on Christmas don’t necessarily correlate. Before accessing the following link (which will take you to a chronological listing of such issues we have listed on our website – most of which are no longer available), think back through the past 300-400 years and try to come up with a handful events which were reported on Christmas morning. Once done, go to the link to see if you were successful. Enjoy – oh, and Merry Christmas.

Christmas Morning Newspapers

Headlines of History… The St. Louis Mercantile Library…

November 13, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

If you are in the St. Louis area in the near future, you may want to stop by the St. Louis Mercantile Library to view their new exhibit: “Headlines of History: Historic Newspapers of St. Louis and the World Through the Centuries at the St. Louis Mercantile Library Association.” A few related links are as follows:

Library An exhibit on the history of newspapers is now on display at the St. Louis Mercantile Library at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

Coverage via Facebook

Posted Interview Regarding the Exhibit

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