The October (2021) Newsletter from Rare & Early Newspapers…

October 15, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

Monthly Newsletter ~ Rare & Early Newspapers

Welcome to the October, 2021 edition of our monthly newsletter. Hopefully you continue to find collecting/reading historic newspapers as a respite from the ongoing onslaught of troubling news which continues to consume the airwaves. So, in this regard, please enjoy the following:
Newly Added Catalog Items (nearly 50 added this week) – A selection of topics/issues include: President Lincoln formalizing Thanksgiving as a National holiday, Babe Ruth being “purchased” by the Boston Red Sox (in a Boston newspaper), the Maryland “Jew Bill”, Thomas Edison invents the phonograph, Ben Franklin’s “Morals of Chess”, an article/speech related to the extermination of Jews (1936), and more.

 

Twenty-Five Issues Discounted to $10 – Great for gift giving. For what its worth, in our opinion “gifting” one (or more) to yourself is acceptable. 🙂

 

Newly Discounted Newspapers ~ 50% off (through November 11th) – We’ve tried to include topics covering a wide-variety of collecting interests.

 

Did You Know? Did you know many of Walt Whitman’s poems first appeared in the newspapers of his day? We have identified a selection of newspapers which include his poetry at: WALT WHITMAN

 

I thoroughly enjoy historic newspapers and greatly appreciate those who have a similar passion. Thanks for collecting with us!

 

Sincerely,

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team
RareNewspapers.com
570-326-1045

Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers . . .
           . . . History’s Newsstand
“…desiring to conduct ourselves honorably in all things.” Hebrews 13:18b

“Things I Never Knew”… Fredrick Douglass Edition…

October 7, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

It’s amazing how one can work intimately with history for years-on-end and still find so much you don’t know – and I’m certainly a case in point.  I find that after 2 years of exploring (technically called working) at RareNewspapers, I am still surprised & delighted on nearly a daily basis.  Just yesterday, as I began to dig into the background of one of America’s heroes, Frederick Douglass, I discovered he had served as U.S. Marshal –  a fact which may have been known to many of the readers of the History’s Newsstand blog, but was new(s) to me:

“When Republican Rutherford B. Hayes was elected president, he named Douglass as United States Marshal for the District of Columbia, the first person of color to be so named. The Senate voted to confirm him on March 17, 1877.[147] Douglass accepted the appointment, which helped assure his family’s financial security.[51] During his tenure, Douglass was urged by his supporters to resign from his commission, since he was never asked to introduce visiting foreign dignitaries to the President, which is one of the usual duties of that post. However, Douglass believed that no covert racism was implied by the omission, and stated that he was always warmly welcomed in presidential circles.” (Wiki)

I love how I get to spend my days!

 

They put it in print, 1917 – “The more things change…”

October 4, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

A recent post focused on a headline which borrowed Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr’s famous words from 1849: “the more things change, the more they stay the same” (translated from “plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose”). This tendency, as applied to human behavior, has certainly been substantiated time and time again in the world of politics.

During former President Trump’s term in office “leaks” were springing up everywhere. For a novice to the political realm this may have appeared to have been a new phenomenon; however, the banner headline from a San Diego Evening Tribune dated January 8, 1917 makes it clear that once again, Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr was spot-on. How do we know? They put it in print:

Announcing: Catalog #311 (for October, 2021) is now available…

October 1, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpg

Catalog 311 (for October) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 350 new items, a selection which includes: the Articles of Confederation, a nice account of Lincoln’s assassination, a graphic issue on the sinking of the Titanic, George Washington is elected President, Winslow Homer’s famous ‘Snap The Whip’, Washington crosses the Delaware, an issue almost entirely devoted to the Lincoln assassination (with a print of Booth), the first newspaper published in Alaska (with Seward’s speech to the citizens of Sitka), an issue with the iconic Uncle Sam print, a Civil War broadside, the famous Hamilton and Burr duel, the creation of the United States Marine Corps, nice content on Lewis & Clark, and more.

 

The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days,

upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.

They put it in print, 2003 – “Horses with no names?”

September 23, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

Many recognize the names of the most famous racehorses of all time: Seattle Slue,  Man o’ War, American Pharaoh, and Citation to name a few – especially if they were featured in a major Hollywood Movie, but what about their sired offspring? Do we recognize their names? How do we even refer to them? Perhaps “Seattle Slue and his Crew”, “Man o’ War and his War Reenactors”, “American Pharaoh and his Royal Subjects”, and/or “Citation and Prized Awards” would be appropriate? While all of these ideas ended up on the drawing room floor, one did make the cut. Thanks to his jockey’s restaurant, we have “Seabiscuit and his Little Biscuits”. How do we know? In the July 10, 2003 issue of the Los Angeles Times, they put it in print.

While none of Seabiscuit’s foals grew up to become famous in and of themselves, the restaurant he inspired is still in business.

– – – – – – – – –

Update 9/28/2021, compliments of K.W. from Illinois…

The September (2021) Newsletter from Rare & Early Newspapers…

September 17, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

Monthly Newsletter ~ Rare & Early Newspapers

Welcome to the September, 2021 edition of our monthly newsletter. Please enjoy.

Newly Added Catalog Items (30 more added just this week) – some of the topics/issues include: a rare (1792) printing of what many consider Alexander Hamilton’s greatest work (“Report on Manufactures”), President Harding formalizes the United States support of creating a Jewish homeland, a Confederate newspaper from Grenada (Mississippi), the iconic cover of the Village Voice (shows Bob Dylan, The Beatles, and Timothy Leary), a graphic issue on the battle of Gettysburg, Abraham Lincoln’s 1863 “We have forgotten God…” proclamation, a 1774 publication with the text of the “Declaration & Resolves of the First Continental Congress” (aka ‘Declaration of Colonial Rights’) in response to the hated “Intolerable” Acts by Congress, Jackie Robinson’s MLB (baseball) debut, Benjamin Franklin’s Plan for the Union (1754), and more.

Newly Discounted Newspapers ~ 50% off (through October 14th) – topics/issues include: a newspaper printed on plastic, boxing’s first world championship (with a mention of the Pony Express as a bonus, a Mormon periodical from Denmark, a French newspaper from the 1600’s, the 1778 Siege of Newport (Rhode Island) along with a map of Dominica, a report re: John Wesley in Savannah (Georgia), George Washington’s state-of-the-union address to Congress, the Jewish Year of Jubilee convention and Harding’s letter to the Jews, The Wizard of Oz debuts on television, the Death of Henry Ford, the stock market reaches 10,000 for the first time, the Battle of Tippecanoe (sorry, no Tyler too from what I can see), and more.
The Wright Brothers’ Famous Flight Encircling The Statue of Liberty (1909) – I love this collectible! I am currently reading “The Wright Brothers”, by David McCullough, and in the process was reminded of their famous flight encircling The Statue of Liberty in 1909. While we have offered the well-known Harper’s Weekly issue which covered this event, I was inspired to explore our archives to see if we had coverage in one of our titles – and voilà, not only did we have coverage, we found it in an original newspaper from New York… with multiple photos to boot. What fun! I immediately read the report and compared it to McCollough’s description of this historic event. Analysis? Spot On!
If interested, the following links provide a glimpse of our discovery:

Thanks for collecting with us.

Sincerely,

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team
RareNewspapers.com
570-326-1045

Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers . . .
           . . . History’s Newsstand
“…desiring to conduct ourselves honorably in all things.” Hebrews 13:18b

Announcing: Catalog #310 (for September, 2021) is now available…

September 3, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpg

Catalog 310 (for September) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 300 new items, a selection which includes: the “Handshake of the Century” (between Jackie Robinson & George Shuba), Edmund Burke’s historic: On American Taxation… First Continental Congress’ appeal, Nice front page reporting on the Custer Massacre, Progressive “Bull Moose” Party is founded in 1912, New York City’s Graffiti artists, “The North Star” becomes “Frederick Douglass’ Paper”, the first convention of clubs: the birth of organized baseball, Lincoln steps upon the national stage… The Cooper Union speech, Synagogues hold memorial services… with much on the assassination & funeral of Lincoln, Extremely early mention of George Washington… French & Indian War, the full text of the Louisiana Purchase, the formation of the Mormon Church, the first full-fledged Broadway musical, and more, and more.

 

The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days,

upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.

The Rare & Early Newspapers website’s “search” capabilities…

August 30, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

I memorized the U.S. Presidents in chronological order, based on a theory that we learn new things by attaching them to things we already know.  For example, if Abraham Lincoln is the 16th, then hanging James Buchanan and Andrew Johnson on either side of him creates a bigger building block to which attach Franklin Pierce and Millard Fillmore at the earlier side, and Ulysses S. Grant and Rutherford B. Hayes on the later side. In this way, the framework of established knowledge allows further acquisition.

The Rare & Early Newspapers website encourages that way of learning.  When you search a topic, name, or general time period, all the results appear arranged by the date they were listed for sale, with the most recent listing at the top.  However, by changing “Sort:” from “Date of Addition” to “Issue Date,” a timeline appears that can be further modified by selecting “Newest First” or “Oldest First,” although it defaults to the most recent date at the top, which I find the most helpful order.

This tool is beneficial for a few consumer-based reasons, but my purpose is usually education.  Collectors know way more about their area of focus than I do, but I can learn quickly from the website listings.  For example, “Bonnie & Clyde” are familiar names, but a scroll down through the search reveals listings and images of headlines — the earliest dated May 20, 1933.

The listing reads as follows:  “‘Two Girls Help Men rob Minnesota Bank; Town Raked by Machine-Gun Shots in Escape:  Two young women and two men bearing sub-machine guns robbed a bank of $2,500 today…scattering shots down the main street as they fled… with much more detail. This robbery was reportedly committed by the infamous Bonnie & Clyde, (see Wikipedia) which if true would be the earliest report of their robberies we have found in a newspaper. But another source doubts it was committed by this infamous duo but by the Strain Gang instead, although even this site (see Wikipedia) raises the question: ‘…did the Strain gang take the fall for a Barrow gang job?’ Two sources with different opinions.”

And the newest listing, an August 22, 1938, issue of the Chicago Daily Tribune, says, “First report coverage on the capture of the last of the Bonnie & Clyde gang, Floyd Hamilton.”

That is one small aspect of this feature; I will be sure to fill you in with new ones as I find them. Oh, and I’ve already found the “Advanced Search” feature!

Announcing: Catalog #309 (for August, 2021) is now available…

July 30, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpg

Catalog 309 (for August) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 300 new items, a selection which includes: an American broadside with King’s announcement of American freedom, a Philadelphia newspaper from 1729, the Emancipation Proclamation in the N.Y. Herald, a terrific & very graphic issue on the Hindenburg disaster, Don Larsen’s World Series perfect game, front page report on the death of Jesse James, and more.

 

The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days,

upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.

Why collect Rare & Early Newspapers? July 23rd…

July 23, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

It has often been said (by Tim Hughes and other collectors of historical newspapers) that “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported”. When past events are studied through the eyes of those who experienced them first-hand, revisionism, “woke”-ism, and the politicizing of history is kept to a minimum. The breadth and depth of our understanding of the past is undoubtedly enhanced when we view past events through the lens of contemporaneous reporting. This is one of the great satisfactions those of us at Rare & Early Newspapers enjoy on a daily basis, and the driving force behind why more and more people are joining the ranks of those who collect newspapers.

While history certainly has its share of triumph and tragedy, success and failure, progress and regression, together they combine to form the tapestry of our shared human experience. Warts have been part of daily life since we made our all-to-quick exit from The Garden, but hopefully, as we study history in order to learn from the good and the bad, the knowledge we gain by observing the past will inform our actions of the present to help pave the way for a few less blemishes in the future. Our hope is that those who collect historic newspapers 100… 200… 500 years from now will find we were good stewards of our own current events.

It is with the above in mind we will occasionally post the list of newspapers we have for a specific day in history.

Today we explore:  July 23rd

 

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