July 23rd… Why collect Rare & Early Newspapers?

July 23, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

It has often been said (by Tim Hughes and other collectors of historical newspapers) that “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported”. When past events are studied through the eyes of those who experienced them first-hand, revisionism, “woke”-ism, and the politicizing of history is kept to a minimum. The breadth and depth of our understanding of the past is undoubtedly enhanced when we view past events through the lens of contemporaneous reporting. This is one of the great satisfactions those of us at Rare & Early Newspapers enjoy on a daily basis, and the driving force behind why more and more people are joining the ranks of those who collect newspapers.

While history certainly has its share of triumph and tragedy, success and failure, progress and regression, together they combine to form the tapestry of our shared human experience. Warts have been part of daily life since we made our all-to-quick exit from The Garden, but hopefully, as we study history in order to learn from the good and the bad, the knowledge we gain by observing the past will inform our actions of the present to help pave the way for a few less blemishes in the future. Our hope is that those who collect historic newspapers 100… 200… 500 years from now will find we were good stewards of our own current events.

It is with the above in mind we will occasionally post the list of newspapers we have for a specific day in history.

Today we explore:  July 23rd

 

18th Century Gentleman’s Magazines – So Much For So Little…

July 16, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

Over 40 years ago we discovered one of the best titles of the 18th century for period news reporting. The title wasn’t even a newspaper but rather, “The Gentleman’s Magazine” from London.

Having begun in 1731, Gentleman’s Magazines ran uninterrupted for nearly 200 years publishing pages capturing news reports concerning America which could never be found in period American newspapers, and were rarely found in period British newspapers.

From its earliest years this popular title printed reports as varied as the creation of the colony of Georgia, William Penn laying out the city of Philadelphia, slave revolts, and reports of pirates operating in the Caribbean.

Issues have much on Ben Franklin & his work with electricity including the lightening rod & famous kite experiments as well as rarely published poems by the famed slave poet Phyllis Wheatley.

Death reports of the famous–and infamous–abound, from Mozart to Handel, from John Paul Jones to George Washington, Patrick Henry and Benedict Arnold… the list is awe inspiring.

Military events are abundant including much on the French & Indian War (with very early Colonel George Washington reports) & all the Revolutionary War battles from the Boston Massacre through the Treaty of Peace.

Keep in mind the American colonies were part of the global British Empire until 1776 so there was much interest in not only American events but notable world events which affected the broad scope of British interests.

Some of the best gems to be found are very inconspicuous reports such as the hanging of what would famously become known as the Liberty Bell. Under the heading: “America” and with a “Philadelphia, May 10” dateline from 1753 is a report reading: “Last week was raised and fixed, in the State-House Steeple, the great bell, weighing 2080 lb. cast here, with this inscription, ‘Proclaim liberty throughout all the land, to the inhabitants thereof.”

The full text of the hated Stamp Act is found within the pages of a Gentleman’s Magazine, and just one year later is found the formal repeal of the Stamp Act by King George III. Other Acts of Parliament harmful to colonial relations are reported as well.

Historic documents are certainly not lacking, among them being the Articles of Confederation, the “Causes & Necessity for Taking Up Arms”, the Constitution of the United States (in 1787), and the most desired document of all, the Declaration of Independence.

At a time when an early period printing of the Declaration in an American newspaper will sell for a half a million dollars or more, the ability to purchase a 1776 magazine with a timely printing of the full text of the document for under $4000 is a rare opportunity for any collector.

An added bonus found in many issues of Gentleman’s Magazine is that while plates and maps can simply not be found in newspapers of the 18th century, this wonderful publication contains a wealth of these engravings and wood-cut prints.

Printed separately from the regular pages of the issue and tipped within, most of the maps fold out to be double the size of the issue, and they include some of the more desired maps one would want of the 18th century, including Philadelphia, the colonies (from 1755), Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Rhode Island, the Caribbean, St. Augustine, the entire western hemisphere and so much more. Many collectors choose to frame the maps separately from the issue as they are very decorative and are typically dated in an upper corner.

Plates include the Philadelphia State House (later to be known as Independence Hall), St. Philip’s Church in Charleston, the fort at Bunker’s Hill, Ben Franklin’s ‘Square of Squares’, the guillotine which beheaded Louis XVI and his wife, a slavery medal, and even a plate of the Garden of Eden. What I have just described only scratches the surface of the treasures these magazines hold.

The “Gentleman’s Magazine” is a little gem packed with all the history one would want to find from the 18th century. Each issue typically has about 40 pages, and measuring about 5 by 8 inches, they take up very little room in a collection.

Perhaps best of all, The Gentleman’s Magazine is an accessible title as our inventory contains thousands of issues, and at prices far below what would be found in comparable American & British newspapers of the same period.

There can be little excuse for holding back on buying the best events in American history if one is willing to add this famous & successful title to their collection. And there certainly will be a time when even this title will become quite scarce as others discover it as a treasure just begging to be collected.

The June (2021) Newsletter from Rare & Early Newspapers…

June 18, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

Monthly Newsletter ~ Rare & Early Newspapers

Welcome to the June, 2021 edition of our monthly newsletter. This month we’ve added nearly 150 items to our list of discounted issues (50% off), a slew of new items to our most recently released catalog, a host of new posts to the History’s Newsstand Blog, and more. Please enjoy.
Catalog 307 – Enjoy both the remaining items from the initial release of our latest catalog of historic newspapers along with a set of newly added items:
  • Newly Added Items (updated just today) – some of the noteworthy (newly added) issues include: Captain Wirz – “The ‘demon’ jailer of Andersonville Prison”, the Gunfight at the OK Corral, the Spindletop oil discovery, multiple issues of Puck (great color covers), private letters of Daniel Webster, Brown vs. Board of Education, Blacks to have rights of citizenship in New York (1785), Adolf Hitler opens the 1936 Summer Olympics, Rabbis reject Palestine as Jewish homeland (?), William Wilberforce and the slave trade, the plan for a colonial town in America (1770), and more.
Discounted Newspapers ~ 50% off – Nearly 150 additional items have been added to our set of discounted newspapers – priced (as shown at 50% off). Although offered at a discount, the set certainly includes some gems. Some of the topics/issues include: a print of the Wright Brothers’ airplane, “the counting of slaves” in 1863, uncovering “The Holocaust”, an evening with Thomas Edison, a review of “King Kong”, the deaths of Tommy Dorsey, Knute Rockne, Jonathan Swift, Grace Moore (the Tennessee Nightingale), and Al Capone, among others.
History’s Newsstand Blog – A sampling of recent posts include:

Thanks for collecting with us.

Sincerely,

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team
RareNewspapers.com
570-326-1045

Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers . . .
           . . . History’s Newsstand
“…desiring to conduct ourselves honorably in all things.” Hebrews 13:18b

The Gentleman’s Magazine & Bankruptcy…

May 8, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

Under the illustration of St. John’s Gate that introduces each issue of the Gentleman’s Magazine, is the month and year, followed by the table of contents (each issue via the link will show an image of this – typically the last image posted).  For the first time, I noticed the calligraphy that follows “CONTAINING” and precedes the article headings and their corresponding page numbers.  “More in Quantity and greater Variety than any Book of the Kind and Price.”  While I have nothing to compare it to, I can attest that of the thirty-seven distinct articles listed for March of 1782, the subject matter ranges from Parliamentary debates to a Swiss underground road, and includes bull-baiting and the wool trade along the way.  The regular coverage of weather, news from around the world, births and marriages and deaths, trials, and literary reviews is fit in around the special bits.

In particular, my interest was caught by “Usual Causes of Bankruptcy, Caution against — ” and turned to page 138 to read.

In all ages there have been men, who, by sudden losses, by entering into indiscreet obligations, by improvident conduct, or through fraudulent designs, have become, or pretended to become, incompetent to the discharges of their just debts; but the number of bankrupts which now appear in every Gazette is a subject of serious and alarming consideration.

Along with the obvious financial harm that can be caused by frivolous living and participation in gambling, the author addresses the lack of care and foresight that must be viewed as the social responsibility of every gentleman, in order to enable him to properly discharge his debts and contribute to the public funds by means of taxes.  He recommends annual reflection for the purpose of seeing areas of weakness in funding, and to not allow debts to unknowingly pile up beyond the ability to repay.  Then, he maintains, steps toward frugality can be made in enough time to avert distress.  Finally, he offers as example the late Sir Stephen Theodore Janssen who he terms a “virtuous citizen.”  He records the words of Sir Stephen, addressed to the Livery, as he deems them of value to the general population.  The speech concludes in this way:

I do further declare that it is my determined resolution to continue living in the same frugal manner, till the last shilling is discharged; and in case any turn of fortune should happen to me, my whole just debts shall be discharged so much the sooner, as I am determined to persevere in preserving the character of an honest man.

Announcing: Catalog #306 (for May, 2021) is now available…

April 30, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpg

Catalog 306 (for May) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 300 new items, a selection which includes: the Declaration of Independence (in a newspaper), the Lincoln/Douglas debate (in an Illinois newspaper), the ‘closest’ to the famous Nathan Hale quote to be found, one of the best Lusitania issues we have offered, Washington’s third state-of-the-union address, the first depiction of a baseball game in progress in any periodical, and more.

 

The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days,

upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.

The April (2021) Newsletter from Rare & Early Newspapers…

April 19, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

Monthly Newsletter ~ Rare & Early Newspapers

Welcome to the September 2020 edition of our monthly newsletter. This month we’d like to bring your attention to the following:

An Expanded Set of Discounted Newspapers – 50% Off

Approximately 150 historic newspapers have been discounted by 50%. The prices shown reflect the discount. Included are:  Thomas Nast Santa illustrations, 19th century western Colorado, assassination of Jack “Machine Gun” McGurn, the Rosenbergs found guilty, Babe Ruth’s last homerun as a Yankee, Nadia Comaneci scores a perfect 10, Bing Crosby’s death, and more.

New Items Added to January’s Catalog

Since Catalog 302 went to print we’ve added approximately 50 additional items. Some of the topics/issues include: a mid-1700’s map of Eastern Canada, Convicts shipped off to America and Oglethorpe before the founding Georgia in the same issue, several different rare Confederate newspapers, George Washington rejects an honor and the delegates to the Constitutional Convention in the same American issue, a Philip Burke caricature of Donald Trump, and more.

Catalog 302

Speaking of the catalog, some links which you may find useful include:
Key Issues from Catalog 302
Catalog 302 (in “Quick Scan” format)
Catalog 302 – Priced under $50

 

History’s Newsstand

 

Newly Discovered Items

Items which have been listed on our website within the last 30 days.

 

Thanks for collecting with us.

Sincerely,

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team
RareNewspapers.com
570-326-1045

Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers . . .
           . . . History’s Newsstand
“…desiring to conduct ourselves honorably in all things.” Hebrews 13:18b
See what’s happening on our social sites

The April (2021) Newsletter from Rare & Early Newspapers…

April 16, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

Monthly Newsletter ~ Rare & Early Newspapers

Welcome to the April 2021 edition of our monthly newsletter. This month we’d like to bring your attention to the following:

An Expanded Set of Discounted Newspapers – 50% Off

Approximately 200 historic newspapers have been discounted by 50%. The prices shown reflect the discount. Included are: the Dalton Gang is “wiped out”, the death of Martha Washington, a broadsheet-extra re: the attempted assassination of President Garfield, the Supreme Court’s outlawing of prayer in public schools, and more.

New Items Added to April’s Catalog

Since Catalog 305 went to print we’ve added approximately 50 additional items. Some of the topics/issues include: a Frank Leslie’s Illustrated issue on the hanging of the “Lincoln Conspirators”, Babe Ruth as a Baltimore Oriole (quite rare), a hard-to-find 1840 campaign newspaper, the “fixed” boxing match between Jack Johnson and Jess Willard – 26 rounds, a great map of Jamaica in 1762, and more.

Catalog 305

Speaking of the catalog, some links which you may find useful include:

Key Issues from Catalog 305

Catalog 305 (in “Quick Scan” format)

Catalog 305 – Priced under $50

History’s Newsstand

Newly Discovered Items

Items which have been listed on our website within the last 30 days.

 

Thanks for collecting with us.

Sincerely,

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team
RareNewspapers.com
570-326-1045

Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers . . .
           . . . History’s Newsstand
“…desiring to conduct ourselves honorably in all things.” Hebrews 13:18b
See what’s happening on our social sites
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Announcing: Catalog #304 (for March, 2021) is now available…

March 1, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpg

Catalog 304 (for March) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 300 new items, a selection which includes: a Masthead engraving by Paul Revere, ‘The Maryland Gazette’ from the French & Indian War, a 1775 ‘Virginia Gazette’ from Williamsburg, the most famous of all Lincoln assassination newspapers, the Articles of Confederation are now in force (1781), the Boston Red Sox purchase Babe Ruth, and more.

 

The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days,

upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.

William Cowper speaks out against slavery (1791)… They put it in print…

February 25, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

Thank goodness “cancel culture” did not exist (at least in [Wilbur]force) back in 18th century.

Flashback to the late 17oo’s… Although slavery had been part and parcel of many cultures for thousands of years, and was certainly woven throughout all aspects of life and commerce in Great Britain, some were staunchly against the practice and had the courage to fight for those whose skin color did not match their own. One such person who was particularly outspoken in this regard was the popular and well-respected poet/hymnologist William Cowper. Although taking such a stand was both an affront and a danger to the political and social mores of the day, he (and others with similar convictions) were permitted to speak, and in the long-run, the world’s view was eventually transformed. How do we know? They (actually) put it in print!

The following excerpt from one of his anti-slavery poems was printed in the Columbian Centinel dated June 16, 1791:

Snapshot 1936… It’s time to help the Jews…

February 15, 2021 by · Leave a Comment 

In the midst of rampant anti-Semitism, and just a few years prior to the start of the Holocaust, David Lloyd George, the former Prime Minister of Great Britain, made an impassioned plea for the world to come to the rescue of the Jewish People by providing them with the homeland they had been promised decades earlier. In his speech he reminded the world of how the Jews had come to the aid of England… and the United States… and Russia, and were now in need of a response in kind. Unfortunately his call to action fell on deaf ears and the impact of heads buried in the sand now stands as a black mark on the timeline of history. The following account of his appeal to the House of Commons was found in The Scranton Times dated June 10, 1936:

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