The Traveler… laying the cornerstone… a time to remember…

July 6, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Blog-7-6-2015-GettysburgThis week I traveled back to July 5, 1865 by the way of The New York Times. There I found the reporting of “The Celebration Yesterday on the Great Battlefield” at Gettysburg. There they had “The Ceremonies of the Laying the Corner Stone of the Gettysburg Monument.” Many generals were on hand for this occasion with General Howard being the orator of the day. Within his speech, he included Abraham Lincoln’s infamous “Gettysburg’s Address”, which is included in the text of the article.

Also in the issue is the coverage of the Fourth of July celebration in New York City, including the “Ovation to the Returned Veterans” and “The Wounded Veterans.”

~The Traveler

The Gettysburg Address… What did he actually say?

November 19, 2013 by · 1 Comment 

“Four score and seven years ago…”

150 years ago this month, President Abraham Lincoln delivered what we now consider to be one of the greatest speeches of all time. Interestingly enough, since 5 different manuscripts exist, there is some disagreement amongst historians concerning what he actually said. Might original newspapers of the day with eye witness accounts provide the answer? If the speech had been long we probably wouldn’t have a high degree of confidence in the newspaper reporters’ accounts, but the brevity of the speech certainly increases the probability of an accurate transcription. Original reports may not have the definitive answer to this question, but they certainly provide reasonable evidence regarding what was actually spoken. Once again, “History is never more fascinating than when it is read from the day it was first reported.

View Authentic Newspapers with Gettysburg Address Coverage

The Traveler… the bloodiest battle in the Civil War…

July 5, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Today I traveled back 150 years to the battlefields of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, through the means of the reports of the Confederate broadside newspaper, the Daily Dispatch — Extra dated July 5, 1863. The headlines read “LATEST FROM THE NORTH” and “GREAT BATTLE AT GETTYSBURG”. “The Yankees claim not to be defeated and to have captured 6,0oo prisoners — The Confederates hold the field — Yankee Generals Reynolds and Paul killed — Heavy Loss of the Federals — The grand battle expected Friday, &c., &c.”. This broadside carries in great detail the battles of Wednesday, July 1st, and Thursday, July 2nd.

As we know, this was the bloodiest battle (non-single day) in the Civil War with the loss of over 51,000 lives and is known as the war’s turning point.

~The Traveler

Gettysburg revisted… 150 years ago…

June 28, 2013 by · 2 Comments 

Since the birth of the United States, there may not be a single more formative event than The Battle of Gettysburg. Authentic newspapers containing first-hand accounts continue to be one of the most sought after within the collectible. Over the years several History’s Newsstand posts have been written about these contemporary reports. A sample of a few are:

The ultimate optimist…

Beyond the big, historic headline…

The Civil War…

The “top ten”: 19th century…

Most historic Civil War event…

The following are the currently available original newspapers with reports related to the Battle of Gettysburg. Please enjoy a brief walk into the heart of “America in crisis” (arranged in chronological order):  Battle of Gettysburg

The ultimate optimist…

May 7, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

I’ve always enjoyed reading the editorial on page 2 of the “Richmond Examiner” newspaper, as the bias shown by the writer was often strongly in favor of the Confederate cause. But in the issue of July 25, 1863 the editor stretched his optimist about as far as it could reach. With  the Confederate failure at Gettysburg and their advance into the North stopped, all might have seemed hopeless for the Confederate forces. But the editor tried to put a positive spin on the events by stating:

“…failed by a single accident, by a single mistake–that sad one at Gettysburg…But after all, the depression which its failure produced on the public mind was more than was warrantable. The result was not a defeat, it was not a loss; it was only not a victory, not one of the most brilliant triumphs ever recorded. It was little else than a disappointment of extraordinary expectations…”.

Please enjoy…