They Put It In Print… Schools need to teach The Constitution…

October 29, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

Human nature has a tendency to drive us to forget – to enjoy the bountiful privileges earned on the backs, and at times the very lives of those who have gone before us, but to forget the great cost paid to obtain them. After a few generations pass, the backdrop which drove such impassioned effort to earn them is also lost.

The year was 1922. It had been a mere 1.5 centuries since the ratification of The U.S. Constitution had paved the way for a new form of society, and there was already a deep-rooted concern that the unless citizens studied and learned the basic tenets of the Constitution, it would not stand. How do we know? The Virginia Pilot dated September 22, 1922 put it in print. Although its now nearly 100 years since the article was written, the call remains – perhaps even more-so.

Anticipation enhanced by delayed gratification… King Tut…

June 11, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

A bride-to-be as her wedding day approaches… a young child the night before Christmas… a family as it heads off towards a long-awaited vacation destination (Can anyone hear, “Are we there yet?”)… a teacher during the last week of May – as the end of the year nudges closer… a groom as his wedding night draws near – there is no doubt that delayed gratification buoyed by a humongous helping of perseverance tends to make long anticipated events taste even sweeter. Such was to be the case for Howard Carter (archeologist – backed by financier George Herbert) as he entered the newly discovered tomb in late November of 1922 to find drawings related to the funeral of King Tutankhamun painted on the walls. After more than a decade of searching – failure built upon failure, could this be it? While newspapers would not report the opening of the inner tomb until February the following year, the front page of The New York Times from December 1, 1922 had the announcement of Carter’s initial find – with mention of the King Tut related drawings. One can only imagine the escalation in excitement this created – and the building of anticipation which occurred over the next few months. Unlike the opening of Al Capone’s vaults in 1986, this find would not disappoint!

Wireless telephones in 1922… If only they knew…

January 26, 2017 by · 2 Comments 

As far back as 1922 the international community, including the U.S., appreciated the potential benefits of wireless communication, but also understood it was fraught with problems. At the time their greatest concern was interruption of service due to interference from other devices. Of course we now know this “issue” was just the tip of a very dangerous (invasion of privacy) iceberg. How ironic the very institutions which were decrying the inherent drawbacks are now likely those who are exploiting them – at the expense of its citizens. Still, this early article found in the February 8, 1922 issue of the NY Times makes for interesting reading.