Say it isn’t so – The Natural Bridge for sale?

October 13, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Blog-10-31-2014-Natural-Bridge-of-VirginiaThe Half-dome of Yosemite, Niagara’s Falls, the peaks of the Grand Tetons… Who is not overwhelmed by these and similar examples of the wonders of God’s creation?  Yet too often we take them for granted – assuming they will forever be “open to the public” for those desiring to breathe in the Designer’s handiwork – never considering their ownership.  Occasionally an event provides us with a reality check, bringing us down-to-earth so to speak, and forces us to consider whether or not such marvels should be owned by no one… or perhap0s even better, by all.  An 1849 report in the National Intelligencer (November 27, 1849) is a case in point.

The Natural Bridge of Virginia is for sale? Please view the hyperlink above to read one man’s reaction to this very true event. His thoughts challenge us to consider whether or not such beauty should somehow be preserved for the public good, and to appreciate the simple pleasures of a rainbow, a sunset, and the fresh dew of the morning. It is nice to read his views written more than 25 years before the 1st National Park (Yellowstone) was established, and more than 50 years before the establishment of the National Park System (in 1916).

A life wasted…

July 18, 2014 by · 2 Comments 

We were not designed to spend our days consumed with self, meaningless activity, and various forms of virtual reality (note: a quick search on the Rare Newspapers website for “self”, “meaningless activity”, and “virtual reality” is returned void).  The following article found in a National Intelligencer from November 21, 1848 is worth pondering:Blog-7-18-2014-Thoughts-on-Life-II

It looks like we might make it to 2013…

December 28, 2012 by · 2 Comments 

While the jury is still out, it looks like we just might make it to 2013. The Mayans certainly gave us a few things to think about (or at least the head of the Mexican Bureau of Tourism – what a genius). Apocalyptic fears have generated quite a bit of stir over time and have motivated (inspired?) many to think through the eternal vs. the temporal. While this version of the “end of days” may have been misconceived, the process of giving our mortality serious consideration is certainly worth the exercise.  In the meantime, please enjoy a newspaper-based look back at similar end of the word fears posted by the British Newspapers Archives:

It’s not the end of the world!

Historical Newspaper Stories About the End of the World

Not too much has changed in over 60 years…

June 22, 2012 by · 1 Comment 

This six-point prescription for a longer life appeared on the front page of the “Detroit Free Press” issue of March 17, 1951.

A Christmas thought… loving our enemies…

December 25, 2011 by · 1 Comment 

As we reflect on all we’ve been given, the following historic account seems quite timely.  The coverage, from WWI, appeared in the New York Times, December 31, 1914.  I believe no commentary is needed:

Merry Christmas!

Ten Golden Rules…

November 5, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

The very first issue of “The British Workman” from 1856, our item 541456, contains a list of “Ten Golden Rules” which are as appropriate today as they were over 150 years ago:

With the holiday season upon us… thanks Bing!

November 25, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

With the holiday season upon us it is time to dig out and dust off our collections of holiday-themed videos (movies???  Dvd’s???) for their annual viewing.  One of our family favorites is Holiday Inn.  Who can forget Bing Crosby’s vision:

Lazy
I want to be lazy
I want to be out in the sun
With no work to be done
Under that awning
They call the sky
Stretching and yawning
And let the world go drifting by…

However, before we sell all we have in our quest for the easy life running a New England Inn, or simply immobilize ourselves with longings for the lazy hazy days of Summer, an article we found in the September 4, 1840 issue of The Citizen Soldier (oddly enough – from Vermont) has a different perspective on laziness – providing ample food for thought:

Here’s to good health…

November 20, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

An article the the September 4, 1840 issue of The Citizen Soldier, Vermont, provides a mid-19th century perspective (advice) for how to acquire good health.  Try to imagine the follow-up letters to the editor in response had this appeared within this morning’s paper.  Please enjoy:

The influence of newspapers…

August 16, 2010 by · 2 Comments 

I’m sure we would all agree with Edward Bulwer-Lytton (1839) that “the pen is mightier than the sword”.  What about the pen as wielded via the text of a newspaper?  Napoleon’s view was that “Four hostile newspapers are more to be feared than a thousand bayonets”.  Interesting comment from one of history’s infamous (famous?) sword bearers.  The following editorial note found on the front page of the June 17, 1867 issue of the Bethlehem Daily Times (PA) provides affirmation of this view:

However, lest we become overly fearful of the devastation such influence  has upon our thinking, Erasmus (1571) provides us with a word of encouragement to the contrary:   “There is no sword to be feared more than the Learned pen”.  Perhaps we are safe.  🙂

Did you notice the 1867 price for the issue shown at the top of the image?  Apparently, if the average person was inclined to be paid “a penny for their thoughts”, newspaper editors believed their thoughts were worth double.

With the ever-decreasing circulations of newspapers, I wonder what the equivalent form of influence is today… and will be 10 years from now???

Food for thought… a little humble pie…

April 10, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

While looking for content on the death of General William Walker in an October 6, 1860 issue of Harper’s Weekly, I came across an interesting morsel I thought everyone might enjoy.  Just a little something to chew on (sorry):

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