My collecting story… M.B. in Sedro-Woolley, WA…

April 9, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

Below we continue our series in which we post the “stories” graciously submitted by our collecting friends during the pandemic of 2020.

I’ve been collecting newspapers of historic events for 50 years. In a purchase last year I was interested in a July 1960 New York Times front page story on the Democratic Party’s nomination of John Kennedy for president. As I perused the inside content I found the real treasure: the Books of The Times review of Harper Lee’s new novel “To Kill a Mockingbird” written by Herbert Mitgang. Many years ago, I worked with his son Lee Mitgang at the Associated Press in New York City.

As additional “stories” are posted they will be available at: MY COLLECTING STORY. We did this many years ago as well – and their posts are also included.

 

My collecting story… J.R. in Ipswich (UK)…

April 7, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

Below we continue our series in which we post the “stories” graciously submitted by our collecting friends during the pandemic of 2020.

In 1945 at the end of the war I was eight and saw my father save the Daily Telegraph proclaiming VE (victory in Europe) Day. I was already an avid newspaper reader (no television then) and decided to add newspapers I found interesting – VJ Day, Nuremberg Trials, Princess Elizabeth wedding, Dakota plane lost in the Alps etc. Soon people gave me old newspapers they had – an aunt gave me Edward/ Mrs Simpson abdication papers and my grandparents two 18th century ones.

This slow rate of collecting continued until the mid 1980s when my income allowed me to spend on myself as well as a wife and the children. I found book shops in London, where we lived at the time, where I could fill the gaps in years which were blank and have reference to most historical events, particularly those relating to improvements in social well-being. By this time I had all years from 1661 and references to most riots, bread marches, demonstrations for improved parliamentary representation, and suffragettes.

The children having long departed and my wife having died I found I had more time (and money) and now am collecting titles as my main interest. This means I am acquiring and understanding how newspapers were able to develop and change their format and means of attracting customers.The growth of size, number of pages, type change, introduction of illustrations and then photographs. Also the relationships of one newspaper to another and the takeovers, combinations and title changes. Now of course I am monitoring their decline.

By collecting different titles I have been able to acquire many short lived extreme left and right wing newspapers and also Irish Republican ones.

After 75 years collecting I now have over 3600 newspapers going back to 1642 and 1900 different titles. What am I going to do with them? None of my family wants them although I am still working on one son-in-law, so they are being offered to my local museum in Ipswich- after many more years of my collecting!

As additional “stories” are posted they will be available at: MY COLLECTING STORY. We did this many years ago as well – and their posts are also included.

 

My collecting story… R.P. in Boise, Idaho…

March 31, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

As an attempt to make good use of the extra time many of us now have as a result of the current restrictions on mobility, about a week ago (from this post) we sent out an email asking collectors to submit their collecting stories. Three topics were suggested:

  • Which newspaper within your collection do you value the most and why?
  • Have you ever found something you consider special within an issue you’ve collected that you did not know was present prior to your decision to obtain it? If so, what did you find?
  • Why do you collect rare/historic newspapers? How did you get started?

The response to-date has been overwhelming (and new entries are welcome – just email them to me at guy@rarenewspapers.com). Over the next few months our plan is to post 1-2 per week. Today we begin with a contribution from R.P. in Boise, Idaho. Enjoy.

In response to your request for posts regarding your customer’s collections I would like to answer a bit of all three suggested topics. 

I have been a rare book collector for over 45 years.  I am a native Oregonian who lives in Idaho.  As a Northwesterner with an interest in history, early on I began to collect first editions of accounts of early expeditions and travels to the western United States.  Because Lewis and Clark reported the first overland expedition to the Pacific across mostly territory controlled by the United States, I needed to begin adding their expedition items to my collection.                                               

In my early collecting days, Lewis and Clark first editions were beyond my means.  However, accounts of their expedition exploits, and President Jefferson’s early messages to Congress, were available in newspapers and some magazines.  So I began collecting as many newspaper recordings about the expedition as I could find.  My collection isn’t huge, but it provides an immediacy which even first edition books don’t provide since all books (even Congressional Journals) were printed well after the activities being reported.  The close proximity of a newspaper account to the actual event occurrence is a primary reason why I collect newspapers and 18th Century American magazines.

Your second suggestion asks about surprises.  From your last catalog I purchased a newspaper from 1848 which contained a Congressional recording of three votes made by Abraham Lincoln while he was in the House of Representatives.  Although I am not a Lincoln collector, I thought this was interesting  and worth owning.  Also, the price was right.  When I perused the Newspaper, I saw two articles regarding the soon to be completed establishment of a new Oregon Territory.  The writers of both articles (one was a Georgia senator and the other was South Carolina’s John Calhoun) advocated that immigrants to Oregon be able to bring their slaves to the territory with the retention of their slave status.  Happily, Oregon did not become a slave territory nor a slave state.

These articles fit well with my reasonably large collection of books, maps and ephemera related to the Oregon Territory which encompassed the present states of Oregon, Washington, Idaho and parts of Wyoming and Montana.

As additional “stories” are posted they will be available at: MY COLLECTING STORY. We did this many years ago as well – and their posts are also included.

Collector Historic Newspapers – A discussion with Tim Hughes…

March 27, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

On March 3, 2020 Mike Safo conducted a podcast with the Tim Hughes, founder of Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers. His textual intro. to the podcast states:

Joined today by the owner and founder of Rarenewspapers.com, Timothy Hughes. Tim and I talk about our weird passion of collecting newspapers and discuss the current state of collecting and the industry today. We chat about his infamous hometown of Williamsport, Pennsylvania, the home of the Little League World Series. How before the newspaper business Tim was employed by Little League International. He talks about the famous 1980 World Series and how that put the LLWS on the map and golfing with Mike Mussina. Tim takes us back to collecting coins and stamps and how buying a 3-dollar newspaper changed everything. From leaving employment with Little League International to how he acquired over a million newspapers from the 1600a to present day. He tells us which newspaper’s he’ll never sell, which are the most in demand and why the hobby is growing.

The entire, informative podcast can be heard at: Mike Safo’s Interview With Tim Hughes

 

Mike describes himself as: “Just a regular New York City guy who gets to interview some pretty amazing people… A conversation/hangout podcast with friends, athletes, authors, celebrities, fighters, and the world’s most fascinating people. ‘The greatest podcast ever’ – My Mom”

March through the years via the lens of Rare & Early Newspapers…

March 6, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

Walk with us back through time to see what noteworthy, historic and collectible events occurred during the month of February. In so doing, we hope you’ll agree: “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.”

March Through Time

Announcing: Catalog #292 (for March, 2020) is now available…

March 2, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpg

Catalog 292 (for March) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 300 new items, a selection which includes: a Confederate newspaper printed on wallpaper, the Funding Act of 1790, the Gettysburg Address, a Lincoln assassination issue from the Capital, Cornwallis surrenders at Yorktown, the “Battle of Los Angeles”, and more.

 

The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

(The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

The February (2020) Newsletter from Rare & Early Newspapers…

February 17, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

Each month the staff of Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers sends out a newsletter to our members which includes special offers, discounts, alerts to new inventory, and information related to the rare newspaper collectible.

The February, 2020 newsletter:

Our most recent newsletter is as follows:

Welcome to the February Newsletter from Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers. Whereas typically a newsletter would focus on Newly Discounted Items (50% off through March 12th), the remaining items from our current catalog (Catalog 281), new posts on the History’s Newsstand Blog, under-the-radar listings which are quite desirable (such as those with Botany Bay and/or Captain Cook content), New Items (outstanding listed after Catalog 291 was released), etc., this month we’d like to bring your attention to three special offerings:
like to bring your attention to three special offerings:

  • A Snapshot in Time – May, 1863 – featuring the Battle of Chancellorsville and the wounding and death of Stonewall Jackson.
  • An incredible issue on the Bombing of Hiroshima – book-ending the beginning an end of American involvement in World War 2 – the first of its kind we have ever had. Note: The most desirable issue regarding the attack on Pearl Harbor is the key report in The Honolulu Star Bulletin. The Bombing of Hiroshima issue in question is a dramatic report on the bombing in this same title.
  • A Free Newspaper – We are offering up to 25 free newspapers from London dated in 1790 – an original printed over 2 1/4 centuries ago. All we ask is for you to pay S&H (standard S&H criteria applies).
Of course this isn’t to say the Newly Discounted Items (50% off through March 12th), the remaining items from our current catalog (Catalog 281), new posts on the History’s Newsstand Blog, under-the-radar listings which are quite desirable (such as those with Botany Bay and/or Captain Cook content), New Items (outstanding listed after Catalog 291 was released), etc., are not worth exploring. 🙂

Thanks for collecting with us.Sincerely,

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team

Timothy Hughes Rare & Early Newspapers . . .
           . . . History’s Newsstand
“…desiring to conduct ourselves honorably in all things.” Hebrews 13:18b
See what’s happening on our social sites

xxxxx

Thanks for collecting with us.

 

Sincerely,

Guy Heilenman & The Rare & Early Newspapers Team

February through the years via the lens of Rare & Early Newspapers…

February 10, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

Walk with us back through time to see what noteworthy, historic and collectible events occurred during the month of February. In so doing, we hope you’ll agree: “History is never more fascinating than when it’s read from the day it was first reported.”

February Through Time

I’m New Here: Still Learning… Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper

February 7, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

I am always ready to learn although I do not always like being taught.   Winston S. Churchill

This is an appropriate enough quote to summarize my perspective at the close of a year of many new lessons – and not all of them pleasant at the time of learning.  It’s tough to be new, but it feels great to be not-new.  Since I find myself in a “next stage” here at Rare Newspapers, as of this week I am transitioning the title(s) of my blog.  Once a month I will continue to pass along something new I have learned, under the heading “Still Learning.” In the other three weeks I will focus on different aspects of this wonderful place.

My most recent orientation was a byproduct of searching the wide world of Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper.  It seems these treasures, similar in size to Harper’s Weekly, are located in a completely different collection of Civil War Era papers.   Although our titles are meticulously indexed and cataloged, the facilities could not possibly be rearranged with each new collection acquired.  Consequently, the front warehouse has its own area of 1861-1865 issues, while the annex has a separate one.  It’s so funny to still be discovering a nook packed full of Historical Relevance (in capital letters).

Within a publication from 1862, I located a four-panel, tipped-in centerfold. It’s a beautiful illustration that measures 20″ high by 32″ wide, folded inside the magazine, with no binding holes or glue lines within the image margins.  The top half is titled “The Second Day of the Second Battle of Bunker Hill”, and depicts a lovely landscape in which lines of marching men wind along hilltops and alongside lanes of trees.  Even the award winning photography of later wars doesn’t compete with the impact of this intricate rendering.

Note that this is not a double-page centerfold, as I originally described it to Guy, but a more extravagantly sized and highly desirable four-panel, tipped-in centerfold.  I have recently been taught the difference.

Anyway, I have much more to learn, but in case you were wondering, I am ready for more Leslie’s requests — particularly Civil War issues.

Announcing: Catalog #291 (for February, 2020) is now available…

February 3, 2020 by · Leave a Comment 

http://images.rarenewspapers.com.s3.amazonaws.com/ebayimgs/Webs/Catalog-Rare-Newspapers.jpg

Catalog 291 (for February) is now available. This latest offering of authentic newspapers is comprised of more than 300 new items, a selection which includes: Frederick Douglass’ follow-up to the ‘North Star’, a ‘Virginia Gazette’ on Bunker Hill & Washington named commander-in-chief, a broadside issue of the ‘Daily Rebel’ from Chattanooga, an issue re: “codes” for rebuilding London after the Great, the surrender of Lee to Grant at Appomattox, Cornwallis surrenders at Yorktown, and more.

 

The following links are designed to help you explore this latest edition of our catalog:

 

Don’t forget about this month’s DISCOUNTED ISSUES.

(The links above will redirect to the latest catalog in approx. 30 days, upon which time it will update to the most recent catalog.)

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